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03,659 

THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 

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A LEVELS: THE 
DAY OF 
RECKONING 

Indispensable 
guide to students 
and parents 
PAGES 8,9 



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■ Jeanette Winterson 
on Joan of Arc 
B Daniel J Boorstin 
on the father of longitude 
PAGES 34,35 


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A-level pass rate climbs to 86% 

Scramble for 
places at 
universities 


By John O'Leary and David Charter 


RECORD A-level pass rates to 
be announced today will trig¬ 
ger an unprecedented scram¬ 
ble for places at leading 
universities and increase pres¬ 
sure on the Government to 
reform the examinations 
system. 

More than half of this 
autumn's 290.000 higher edu¬ 
cation places had been filled 
last night, as admissions tu¬ 
tors coped with the 15th 
successive rise in A-level 
grades. Almost S6 per cent of 
candidates passed their ex¬ 
aminations. with 53.8 per cent 
adtieying grades A to C—the 
traditional requirement for a 
University place. 

*..“he improvements — in 
both cases by about two 
percentage points over last 
year — will leave fewer places 
to be allocated and accelerate 
the clearing process that gives 
disappointed applicants a sec¬ 
ond chance. 

Several leading universities 
sak&ycsterday that they would 
have no places in clearing 
because of improved grades, 
and officials said that at least 
one medical school might 
exceed its quota. Competition 
for popular courses will be 
intense, and most applicants 
should hare secured places by 
early next week. 

While Oxford and Cam¬ 
bridge nerer use the clearing 
process, almost all provincial 
universities usua lly have some 
plaoes available. But Bristol. 
Durham, Edinburgh and Not¬ 
tingham said yesterday that 
they were unlikely to be in 
clearing this year. 

Tony Higgins, chief execu- 
of the University and 
flege Admissions Service, 
said: This is the first time that 
more than half of the places 
have been filled by this stage, 
but it is not a crisis. Because 
more people hare got first 
choice places, there will be 
fewer people chasing fewer 
courses in clearing.” 

Lord Henley, the junior 
education minister, offered 
congratulations on the results 
and urged critics not to equate 


era e=j_ 



SSL. 

•What a coincidence— 
I used to run an A-level 
retake college, too- 


improvement with falling 
standards. "Parents, teachers 
and young people themselves 
must be side and tired of 
hearing and reading doom 
merchants calling into ques¬ 
tion the efforts and achieve¬ 
ments the results re flea." But 
Opposition parties called for 
the number of examining 
boards to be cut to ensure 
consistency in marking. 

Gillian Shephard, die Edu¬ 
cation Secretary, was said to 
be planning to extend the 
School Curriculum and As¬ 
sessment Authority's powers 
to cover A levels — possibly in 
the Queen's Speech — while 
discussion continues an the 
merits of a single examina¬ 
tions council. 

Examination boards and 
teachers' leaders insisted that 
there was no evidence of 
standards slipping and the 
proportion of A grades rose 
more slowly than other pass 
rates — by just under half a 
percentage point to 16 per cent. 

Kathleen TattersalL repre¬ 
senting the boards, said it was 
"the quality of work alone" 
that determined grades. "We 
refute entirely that the compe¬ 
tition between boards lowers 
standards and leads to a 
higher success rate." 

But academics and employ¬ 
ers' organisations expressed 
doubts about the impact of 


modular A levels. These allow 
unlimited re-takes of units 
covering roughly a term's 
work and students can opt not 
to register for the final exami¬ 
nation if they are likely to fail. 

The rally major study of 
standards in modular A levels 
concluded that students 
gained at least one grade 
higher than candidates of 
similar ability on traditional 
courses, and this year the 
“modular" students' pass rate 
was higher in all subjects 
where large numbers took the 
new courses. 

David Triesman, general 
secretary of the Association of 
University Teachers, said that, 
particularly in mathematics, 
there was “strong anecdotal 
evidence of an increasing mis¬ 
match between what A-level 
students achieve and what is 
needed for university cour¬ 
ses”. Roger Young, director 
general of the Institute of 
Management said: “Setting a 
UK record is one thing, but 
our young people are now 
competing in a race against a 
world-class field.” 

Ruth Lea. polk? director of 
the Institute of Directors, was 
concerned about the “lade of 
rigour” in modular exams, 
and the proliferation of “soft” 
subjects at A level 

However, head teachers 
described the criticism as pop¬ 
pycock. David Hart of the 
National Association of Head 
Teachers said: “The achieve¬ 
ments of students and their 
teachers should not be under¬ 
mined by those who seem to 
delight in denigrating their 
success." 

And Steve Sinnott deputy 
general secretary of the Nat¬ 
ional Union of Teachers, said: 
"Students and teachers would 
appreciate at least one year 
when their efforts were not 
undermined by a small, politi¬ 
cally motivated group deni¬ 
grating their achievements. It 
is time this nasty little group 
allowed our young people to 
enjoy their success." 

A-level results, pages 8 and 9 



A British UN peacekeeper calls for help after one of his comrades is wounded during the dashes yesterday 

British soldiers shot in Cyprus 

By Michael Theodoulou in Nicosia, and Michael Eyans, defence correspondent 


TWO British soldiers serving 
with the United Nations force 
in Cyprus were wounded yes¬ 
terday during renewed dash¬ 
es between troops from the 
Turkish-occupied north of the 
island and Greek Cypriot 
demonstrators. 

The two soldiers from 39 
Regiment Royal Artillery suf¬ 
fered gunshot wounds while 
trying to hold back crowds of 
protesters at Dherinia, in the 
in the eastern part of the UN 
buffer rone. 

The unarmed soldiers, who 
are part of a 370-man British 
contingent in the UN force, 
were caught in a hail of bullets 
as Turkish troops opened fire 
on the protesters. One Greek 
Cypriot man was killed and 
several others were wounded. 

It was the second death 
along the island’s “Green 
Line” in four days and one of 
the worst scenes of violence 
since Turkey invaded the is¬ 
lands northern territory in 
1974. 

One of the British peace¬ 
keepers was shot in the lower 
bade while the other was hit in 


the arm. The Ministry of 
Defence in London said their 
injuries were "not life-threat¬ 
ening". The Foreign Office 
condemned the violence 
which, it said, reinforced the 
urgent need for a political 
settlement in Cyprus. 

The shooting began when 



A protester shins up 
the Turkish flagpole 


Greek Cypriot protesters 
forced their way into the 
buffer zone soon after the 
funeral of Tassos Isaac, a 
young Greek Cypriot man, 
who was battered to death by 
a mob from the Turkish-held 
sector in a demonstration an 
Sunday. 

More than 200 people 
among the thousands of 
mourners who attended the 
funeral broke past a Greek 
Cypriot police cordon to 
breach the buffer zone. 

One man climbed a flagpole 
and tried to remove a Turkish 
Cypriot flag. Turkish troops 
opened fire, fatally wounding 
the man. Solomos Solomou, in 
the neck. 

A UN spokesman said: 
“There was one hell of a tot of 
bullets flying from behind the 
Turkish ceasefire line, with 
our men in the line of fire. We 
consider this a disproportion¬ 
ate action to the Greek Cypriot 
provocation.” 

The spokesman said repre¬ 
sentations would be made to 
the Turkish Army at the 
highest level. 


The other Greek Cypriots 
who were wounded, at least 
two of them seriously, includ¬ 
ed a 59-year-old woman who 
had a kidney removed during 
surgery. UN officers said 
same Greek Cypriots had 
thrown stones at Turkish pos¬ 
itions but none of the protest¬ 
ers was armed. 

The British peacekeepers, 
who normally man the most 
sensitive part of the buffer 
zone in and around Nicosia, 
had been redeployed earlier in 
the week to support Austrian 
and Hungarian soldiers and 
Irish police ■ who man the 
dividing line in the east of the 
island. 


TOP JOBS 
SECTION 3 

Murder by 
mail order 
brings new 
calls for 
guns ban 

PRESSURE for a ban on the 
private ownership of hand¬ 
guns intensified yesterday 
after a man who bought a 
semi-automatic pistol through 
the post was jailed for murder. 

Richard Humphrey, who 
killed a woman returning 
home from church and shot 
three other people, bought the 
pistol and ammunition legally 
from a dealer through the 
classified columns of a gun 
magazine after duping an¬ 
other reader into sending him 
his firearms certificate. 

The Recorder of London. Sir 
Lawrence Vemey, said it was , 
deplorable that Humphrey 
had been able to obtain his 
weapons in that way and 
suggested that the law should 
be changed, saying: “Those 
who have to make decisions 
will perhaps make note that it 
was a 22 which caused the 
damage in this case.” 

The Police Federation also 
renewed its call far a ban, 
saying the case exposed a 
loophole in the law. "A whole¬ 
sale prohibition of handguns 
is the solution,” the chairman, 
Fred Broughton, said. 

The case comes hard on the 
heels of the Commons Home 
Affairs Committee's recom¬ 
mendation that an outright 
ban cm handguns was not 
necessary, in spite of pleas 
from the families of die 
Dunblane victims and huge 
public petitions. 

The Government has said 
that it will await the outcome 
of Lord Cullen's inquiry into 
the Dunblane massacre before 
making a derision, but Alan 
Beith of the Liberal Demo¬ 
crats said yesterday: "Supply¬ 
ing guns by mail order is one 
of the terrifying weaknesses of 
the current gun control sys¬ 
tem. The whole system needs a 
complete overhaul.” 

John Prescott, the Labour 
deputy leader, also repeated 
his call for handguns to be 
banned from the home. 


Guns by post, page 3 


Vicar case arrest 

Teny Storey, wanted in con¬ 
nection with the killing of 
£Jvnpool Hear Christopher 
GAay, was arrested a! a flat 
early yesterday — 


Ministry’s risks, page 5 

Lord Rnnrie. page 16 

Drop in jobless 

The Government has hailed 
figiVres showing that unem- 
AJittment has fallen to its 
fo’vtsl level for five years. 
July's fall of24.100 brought the 
total to 2.126.200_Page 23 


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140 046244 


Big Mac windfall for Tories 

By Andrew Pierce, political correspondent 


MICHAEL Pbrtillo's difficul¬ 
ties over the proposed sale of 
his local Tory headquarters to 
McDonald's deepened last 
night when it was disclosed 
that Conservative Central Of¬ 
fice will benefit by up to 
£100.000 from the proceeds. 

The Defence Secretary has 
connections with die fast-food 
chain, one of Britain's biggest 
private employers. He is a 
dose friend of Geoffrey Tuck¬ 
er, 71. McDonald's political 
consultant. 

An approach was made to 
McDonald's, from within Mr 
Portillo's Enfield Southgate 


Conservative Associatirai, to 
buy the Edwardian building. 
McDonald's offered £325,000. 
El00,0O0 more than rival bids. 

Officials dose to Conserva¬ 
tive Central Office made dear 
last night that the par?* high 
command would benefit. “A 
donation in the form of a loan 
of up to £100.000 will be made 
to Central Office from the 
proceeds.” said one. 

If the bid goes through, at 
least £100,000 will be left 
when the local party buys a 
new headquarters. “It will be 
made available to Central 
Office in the form of a loan 


which we can be repaid to the 
local party at any moment." 

The revelation will heighten 
fears among Mr Portillo's 
constituents that the McDon¬ 
ald's offer is effectively a 
political donation. Many loy¬ 
al Tory' activists have vowed 
not to vote for Mr Portillo 
again unless he deddes to 
oppose the bid. Mr Portillo 
has declined because it could 
breach Cabinet collective re¬ 
sponsibility as the bid is likely 
to go to an appeal ruling by 
the Environment Secretary. 

Constituency row. page 2 


Dole is poised to play 
the Colin Powell card 

From Martin Fletcher in san diego. California 


BOB DOLE was last night 
preparing to receive the Re¬ 
publican Party nomination he 
first sought 16 years ago. As he 
did so, speculation grew that 
he might ask Colin Powell to 
be his Secretary of State. 

Dole aides at the party 
convention here were actively 
exploring ways to improve 
their candidate's chances of 
defeating President Clinton in 
November by drawing the 
retired general deeper into the 
campaign. One possibility is 
that Mr Dole will offer Gener¬ 


al Powell the State Depart¬ 
ment job in his administra¬ 
tion. If the general accepts. Mr 
Dole might take the unprece¬ 
dented step of announdng it 
before election day. 

A nightly poll yesterday put 
Mr Dole 12 points behind Mr 
Clinton. That gap has barely 
changed during the first two 
days of the convention but Mr 
Dole hopes for another big 
boost tonight when he formal¬ 
ly accepts the nomination. 

Powell factor, page 12 


Rival slipped Valium to Chizzy the chihuahua 


By Emma Wilkins 

A WOMAN who gave a prize chihua¬ 
hua a Valium rabicr shortly before it 
was due to compete in a top doe show 
was banned from the Kennel Club for 
five years yesterday. 

The pill left Chizzy . a 14-momh-old 
long-haired bitch, incapable of stand¬ 
ing or even wagging her tail, her owner 
Tracey Dyke fold the dub's disciplin¬ 
ary committee. 


It had been given to Chizzy by Carol 
Brampton, a dog owner from 
Favershani. KcnL at the Northern 
Counties Championship show last 
year. 

Mrs Brampton, who denied giving 
the dog Valium and said the tablet was 
a homeopathic remedy, had behaved 
“discreditably and prejudicially" to the 
interests of‘the a rune world, the 
Kennel Club's disciplinary committee 
ruled after a hearing in London. 


She was suspended for five years 
from all Kennel Club shows and events 
and ordered to pay £209 costs. 

The hearing had heard allegations of 
jealousy and intrigue that would have 
put a medieval court to shame. Mrs 
Brampton claimed the allegations 
were made out of jealousy over her 20 
years of success in showing 
chihuahuas. 

Mrs Dyke, of B rams grove. Hereford 
and Worcester, cried when she told 


how Mrs Brampton smiled as she 
administered the 05 milligram tablet 

Chizzy, whose foil name is Deltrame 
Secret Showburst, became lethargic 
and fell into a stupor at the show in 
Lytham St Anne's, Lancashire, where 
Mrs Brampton's chihuahua was also 
competing. 

After the hearing, Mrs Dyke said: 
"This will rock the dog world. This sort 
of thing should not happen and drugs 
should not be used on dogs.” 


fl£V & RADIO.42,43 

Leather . 22 

LETTERS.17 

OBITUARIES.19 

ARTS.31-33 

CHESS & BRIDGE.40 

SPORT.3842,44 

TRAVEL NEWS 20,21 

IIrosswords .22,44 

WILLIAM REES-MOGG.I6 

COURT & SOCIAL.18 

LAW REPORT.36,37 

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HOME NEWS _ thf. times Thursday au gust]M996 

Trust chairman forced out by doctors’ resignation 


By Dominic Kennedy 
SOCIAL AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT 

THE chairman of a hospital trust 
was forced out of his job yesterday 
after 16 of his leading consultants 
resigned. 

Peter Allen. 61. a former senior 
manager with British Steel, agreed 
to relinquish his post to end one of 
the most dramatic trials of strength 
between doctors and managers 
since the National Health Sendee 
internal market was created. The 
resignation will be seen throughout 
the health service as a victory for 
the white coats over the grey suits. 
However, it was unclear whether 


his head would be enough to satisfy 
60 consultants at a leading hospital 
who had already passed votes of no 
confidence in Mr Allfitf and Tony 
Beddow, his chief ex&tilive. 

Gwilym Jones,-. v lhe Minister for 
Health in Walds, said the chairman 
had taken the right decision to leave 
his £19,285-a-year post which in¬ 
volved 34 days work per week. The 
chairman stood down within hours 
of some of the leading clinicians in 
Wales penning individual letters of 
resignation to the trust 

The dispute began when the 
Morriston Hospital NHS Trust in 
Swansea tried to make three doctors 
and 13 medical staff redundant 


without warning last week. The 
trust was facing a cash crisis after 
the local health authority trans¬ 
ferred a £1.6 million contract for 
elderly people’s care to another 
hospital in the area. Its budget was 
said to be E3 million in the red. 

The stand-off threatened to affect 
patients unless a solution could be 
found quickly- The consultants had 
resigned from their duties as dinical 
directors in specialties ranging from 
accident and emergency to urology. 
Their mass resignation was seen as 
unprecedented in the health service. 

They were prepared to continue to 
care for patients, but refused to have 
any more input into the manage¬ 


ment of their hospital, the adminis¬ 
tration of their departments and the 
preparation of contracts. That 
would have made die internal 
market unworkable. 

The vote of no-confidence in the 
two men came after a three-hour 
meeting of 60 consultants. There 
were no dissenting voices. 

The trust’s board responded by 
issuing a unanimous declaration of 
confidence in both of them. Mr 
Beddow is regarded, even by his 
opponents, as a devoted and com¬ 
mitted servant of the NHS with a 
long history as a backroom man 
involved in planning. But his direct 
manner can be seen as abrasive and 


confrontational. Mr Jones said: "I 
have been saddened at this whole 
episode. I recognise that the board 
has faced difficult decisions but the 
root of the problem appears to have 
been a failure of communications 
between themselves and key staff at 
the hospital. 

“The major issue is that all staff 
need to feel that they have an 
opportunity to influence decisions 
that affect their careers and health 
care for patients.” 

The derision is a morale boost for 
the British Medical Association, 
which backed the consultants. Bob 
Broughton, its Welsh secretary, 
said: “The situation can only be 


mended by a change of manag^ 
ment This is the gravest crisis 
farina the NHS in Wales in modern 

Mr Beddow said yesterday, i 
want to bridge the gap with the 
consultants. The challenge now is to 
find ways of cutting the £3 million in 
other ways." 

The hospital consultants were 
last night still hoping to force the 
chief executive to resign. Dr 
Broughton said that the vote of no 
confidence in Mr Beddow still 

stands. . . .,, 

The proposed redundancies ot lb 
staff were withdrawn at the board 
meeting earlier this week- 


‘The association is not listening to the members’ 


Voters desert Portillo 
over ‘Burgergate’ claims 


By Andrew Pierce, Joanna Bale and James Land ale 


MICHAEL PORTILLO, who 
is faring a revolt by previous¬ 
ly Tory-voting constituents 
over plans to turn the local 
Conservative association 
headquarters into a McDon¬ 
alds restaurant, is a dose 
friend of the company's polit¬ 
ical consultant 

Geoffrey Tucker. 71. who 
was director of communica¬ 
tions at Conservative Central 
Office during the Heath 
government has been em¬ 
ployed as a lobbyist for years 
to promote the McDonald's 
cause in Whitehall. 

Many lifelong Tories in Mr 
Portillo's Enfield Southgate 
constituency predicted yester¬ 
day thaf the MP, who has a 
15j563 majority, could lose his 
seat over his refusal to oppose 
the company’s application for 
planning permission for the 
drive-through restaurant 

Residents' suspicions that 
the McDonald’s bid. £100.000 
higher than the rival offers, 
was effectively a political don¬ 
ation will be fuelled by the rev¬ 
elation that local party chiefs 
plan to lend 'some of the 
proceeds of the sale to Central 
Office. 

Mr Portillo, the Defence 
Secretary, was heckled at a 
packed public meeting on 
Tuesday night when he made 
dear that as a Cabinet minis¬ 
ter he could not take sides 
because the planning derision 
could go to appeal and be 


adjudicated by the Environ¬ 
ment Secretary. “We are then 
bound by collective responsi¬ 
bility," he told The Times. 

Mr Portillo was pictured 
last year on the other side of 
tiie counter at an existing 
McDonald’s in Southgate, 
complete with uniform. 

McDonald’s has intimated 
to the local Conservative asso¬ 
ciation that it expects the 
application to be rejected by 
the local authority but to win 
on appeal. Efforts to win any 
appeal have begun. 

The company's formidable 
lobbying operation is already 
under way. The company has 
impeccable contacts. Sir Ber¬ 
nard Ingham. Baroness 
Thatchers former press secre¬ 
tary, is a non-executive direc¬ 
tor of McDonald’s. Mike 
Love, the company's director 
of communications, was the 
former Prime Ministers agent 
when she was MP for Finch¬ 
ley. Mr Love and Lady 
Thatcher are still dose. 

Mr Tucker, the architect of 
the Tories* 1970 general elec¬ 
tion victory, has done most to 
smooth the path to the top of 
the political ladder for Mc¬ 
Donald's. Mr Portillo and his 
wife Carolyn have stayed at 
Mr Tucker'S villa in Lucca, 
Italy. Mr Portfllo, William 
Waldegrave. and Douglas 
Hurd, were guesrs at his 70th 
birthday party at Brooks^. 

A Modonald’s spokeswom¬ 


an said: “Mr Tucker helps to 
arrange political dinners with 
ministers and MPs from all 
parties. We have no political 
affiliations. Mr Tucker also 
gives us political advice.” 

In February, the company 
for the first time hired a firm 
of political consultants. The 
Communication Group, 
which has strong links to the 
Labour Party. A rival lobbyist 
said: “One suspects they decid¬ 
ed to hire [the firm) now to 
prepare for life under a Lab¬ 
our government It is a very 
politically astute company.” 

Few residents in the north 
London suburb doubted that 
McDonald's would triumph 
again. They blamed Mr Portil¬ 
lo. Eileen Fowler, 76, a Tory 
party member who lives opp¬ 
osite the double-fronted Vic¬ 
torian Conservative Associa¬ 
tion headquarters, said: "I will 
never vote for Portillo again if 
- he allows this to go ahead.” 

Mrs Fowler added: “We’ve 
been let down very badly. The 
association is selling to the 
highest bidder without listen¬ 
ing to the ordinary members 
like me, and Portillo says it is 
nothing to do with him. Its 

outrageous." 

Her sister. Gwen Gilbert¬ 
son, 78, who lives nearby, 
added: “My husband has writ¬ 
ten to Portillo, along with 
hundreds of others, but he 
refuses to take sides. How can 
he expect us to vote for him 


when he acts like this?” 

Reg Bird. 87. an association 
member, said: “Most at that 
meeting were Conservative 
voters like me, yet they were 
booing and heckling him. 
Portillo quite honestly is a 
twft. He just tried to hide 
behind everything.” 

In the entrance bail of the 
Conservative association is a 
letter to members from Lionel 
Zetter. the chairman, apolo¬ 
gising for tiie fact that the first 
many of them heard about the 
£325,000 sale was through 
local newspapers, after Mc¬ 
Donald’s issued an 
“unauthorised” press release. 

A spokeswoman for the 
association said yesterday: 
“This is a big old house which 
is being under-used and is 
expensive to maintain. People 
who give money to the party 
want it to go on campaigning, 
not on repair bills." 

McDonald's will fight all 
die way. It took 13 years to 
overcome the objections of 
Hampstead residents to its 
plans but the company won. 

In Leicester last year, hav¬ 
ing suffered the indignity of 
losing a planning appeal, Mc¬ 
Donald’s took the case to the 
High Court and won. 

Few local authorities can 
resist the approach, known as 
a “carrot and stick” strategy. 
Local authorities are threat¬ 
ened with a long and costly 
appeal if planning permission 


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Michael Portillo at a McDonald’s in his Enfield Southgate constituency in 1994 


is refused. Most cash-strapped 
town hails, informed by QCs 
that McDonald’s always wins, 
duck the fight early on. 

The lobbying is formidable. 
The company offers hundreds 
of jobs for unskilled workers. 
Its commitment to local com¬ 
munities is reinforced through 
charitable activities. Scope 


ASA inquiry 
into ‘satanic’ 
Tory image 
of Blair 


Communications Manage¬ 
ment, whose advisers in the 
past have included the Tory 
MP Simon Bums, advises on 
the charity programme. 

Free sports equipment is 
donated to youth groups, cof¬ 
fee mornings are arranged up 
for pensioners, and business 
forums set up for local com¬ 


panies. Opponents have la¬ 
belled the tactics “bribes to the 
community". 

Occasionally, the operation 
comes unstuck. Last year, 
plans for a 190-seat “-drive- 
through" restaurant in Finch¬ 
ley were rejected by Barnet 
council. For once it did not 
appeaL 


By Andrew Pierce 

AN INVESTIGATION has 
been launched by the Adver¬ 
tising Standards Authority 
into a Tory advertisement 
that depicted Tony Blair with 
a wide grin and red eyes. 

The advertisement was 
described as a “satanic” im¬ 
age tty the Bishop of Oxford. 
Political advertisements are 
not governed by the same 
rules as commercial prod¬ 
ucts. The Conservative Party, 
however, may have breached 
the industry code which says 
that advertisers who have not 
obtained prior permission 
from high-profile figures 
have a duty to ensure that 
they are not portrayed in an 
“offensive or adverse” way. 

An ASA spokesman said: 
“We have a duty to investi¬ 
gate. We have had a number 
of complaints.” If the com¬ 
plaint is upheld the ASA can 
compel the Tories to with¬ 
draw the advertisement. 

Peter Mandrison, head of 
Labour's election planning 
unit, said: “I hope that 
eve ry o n e who is offended by 
this grotesque image wfll 
register their objection with 
the ASA.” 


Security guards 
may be vetted 
under new rules 

By Stewart Tendler, crime correspondent 


THOUSANDS of private 
guards face vetting under 
Home Office proposals to 
clean up the security industry. 
Under plans launched yester¬ 
day an independent agency 
would check whether a guard 
had a criminal record and 
would keep a register of 
applicants. If they had convic¬ 
tions the agency would refuse 
them clearance to work. 

New legislation would 
make it an offence to employ a 
guard who had not been given 
clearance and it would be an 
offence for anyone to work as a 
guard without first being 
scrutinised by the agency. 

The agency and its opera¬ 
tions would be self-financing 
and could cost at least £1 
million a year. Employees or 
companies would pay for the 
clearance checks. Home Office 
officials believe at least 49.000 
guards would be covered by 
the proposals now being con¬ 
sidered by the security indus¬ 
try’s leaders and police. 

The proposals follow a re¬ 
port last year from the Com¬ 
mons select committee on 
Home Affairs which called for 
strict regulation of the indus¬ 


try including the licensing of 
guards. The MPs heard evi¬ 
dence from police that up to 
2,600 crimes are committed 
each year by guards. In one 
company. II out of 26 employ¬ 
ees had previous convictions 
ranging from rape to assault 

Announcing the proposals 
yesterday. David Maclean, a 
Home Office minister, said 
most areas of the security 
industry were covered by eff¬ 
ective self-regulation. But he 
said the public was worried 
about contract security 
guards. 

The Association of Chief 
Police Officers and the Police 
Superintendents’ Association 
welcomed the proposals. 

Tony Makosinski, of the 
British Security Industries As¬ 
sociation, said: “We are 
happy, this takes us in the 
right direction. It doesn’t go 
far enough but it's a good 
start" 

Bruce George, Labour MP 
for Walsall South, a cam¬ 
paigner for tighter controls 
said: "This is a feeble, limited 
and panicky reaction to the 
growing demand for regula¬ 
tion of the industry." 


strike is 
collapsing 

About 18,000 postal workers - 
ignored their onion and re¬ 
ported for work during the 
fifth national postal strike 
yesterday- according to Royal 
Mail. It said the return to , 
work was growing and called^ 
again on the Communication^ 
Workers Union to ballot • 
members oo a pay and condi- . 
tions deal agreed at Acas. 

A CWU spokesman main- ~ 
tained that the strike was ' 
strong in most areas of the 
country. The next stoppage is - 
scheduled for next Thursday, v 

Pay protest ? : 

The pensioner who received , 
an angry rebuke from her 
Tory MP for writing to .: 
complain about MW pay 
rises yesterday attacked Lab- "/ 
our for leaking the tetter. . f 
Dame Angela Rum bo Id had - 
told Hilary Pentecost. 76, that . 
she was fed up with protests 
about her 26 per cent pay rise.-^. 

Concrete attack ^ 

A concrete block was thrown - - 
through the window of an - 
SDLP councillor's house in 
Belfast after he had con¬ 
demned IRA punishment 
beatings on television the ... 
night before. Hugh Lewsfey, 
who was beaten in a suspect- 
ed IRA attack last year, 
narrowly escaped injury. - 

Beef sold as lamb : 

Hie Government was urged 
to cany oat a survey of meat .. 
products after the disclosure 
that at least two superman- " 
kets could be facing pidsecu- r 
tion for selling beef as lamb. . 
Trading standards officers 
suspect retailers have been 
including beef in lamb mince 
since the BSE scare. 

Doctor may quit 

MandyADwood. whoispre^. - 
nant with eight foetuses; was 
told yesterday she would have 
to choose between her doctor *: 
and a newspaper deal Pro¬ 
fessor Kypros Nicolaides 
said be was no longer pre¬ 
pared to manage her preg¬ 
nancy “under the spotlight of 
international publicity". 

Hunt continues 

Five French detectives are 
due to arrive in Britain today 
to pursue their investigation 
into the case of Caroline 
Dickinson, 13. from Launces¬ 
ton in Cornwall who was 
raped and murdered in a 
Brittany youth hostel on July 
18 while on a school trip with 
Launceston College. 

Islands for sale 

A chain of private islands off 
the northwest coast of Scot¬ 
land has been put on the 
market The Ascnb Islands, 
about two miles off the 
of the Isle of Skye, ate 1 
expected to fetch more than - 
£200,000. There are six m ain 
islands in the chain, totalling 
around 146 acres. 

Woman named 



The woman found battered to 
death in Manchester after a 
night out with friends was 
named yesterday as Rachel 
T h ac k er. 22. Miss Thacker, 
above, from Chasetown, Staf 


her first job caring for the 
elderly at a hospital in West 
Bromwich today. 


RAF flies blindly into the future 


By Michael Evans 

RAF bomber pilots of the 
future may have to learn to fly 
“blind", sitting in a dosed 
cockpit and relying on sensors 
to judge where they are going. 

The scrapping of the tradi¬ 
tional perspex cockpit is one of 
a number of concepts bring 
studied by RAF experts who 
have been asked to produce 
ideas for a bomber to replace 
the Tornado GR4 by 2015. The 
“hard cover” option has been 
induded because of the threat 
of laser weapons that amid 
blind pilots. 

More than 140 Tornado 
GR4s are currently bring up¬ 
dated with new weapon sys¬ 
tems, pilot displays .and 
avionics, all of which should 
be in service by 2001 How¬ 
ever. by 2015 the Tornado 






A BAe impression of the Future Offensive Aircraft 

airframe will have flown more ing at a rapid rate the RAF 
than double the hours origi- experts have a list of replace- 
nally anticipated - 9,000 in- ment options that include 
stead of 4.000 - and the RAF flying unmanned aircraft arid 
said yesterday work needed to using VCJO-size planes in 

start now on a replacement. launch long-range missiles 
With technologies advanc- However. RAF pilots are corv 


vinced the day of the un¬ 
manned combat aircraft has 
not yet arrived and that the 
Future Offensive Aircraft, as it 
is known, will be flown by air 
crews. 

Even so, one of the concepts 
to be examined is for un¬ 
manned air vehicles (UAVs). 
or remotely piloted aircraft, to 
be used as bomb carriers. 
Easting UAVs. like the Israeli 
battlefield drones, are used for 
reconnaissance. 

. RAF sources said yesterday 
they did not believe the tec* 
nology for arming UAVs with 
a payload of bombs would be 
T^ dy j m 10 replace the 
Tornado GR4. Other un¬ 
manned aircraft could be 
Dawn- remotely from a dis¬ 
tance by a pilot sitting in an 
Awacs command and control 
plane. 





















- AUGUST IS iqqa _ 

a murderer after buying pistols through small ads in a magazine 

filler made mother kneel 


HOME NEWS 3 


A 


then shot her in the head 


^ Lin Jenkins 


A MUGGER who turned ; n ir, 
'£*■ - ? propulsive killer afte^bu^ 

■ 

^tomatjc pistol that had££ 

SZSZL* his home. 

• two robberies and 
™rms offences in the space 
of four months last year Sir 
Uwrene e Vern ey, Recorder of 

- refel T« J during sen- 
- _ dicing to coverage D f the 

■ SSTSL. ” ome ^rs 

V Seta* Committee’s refusal to 

;i 1 Sf'LIIS* TS* is same dung 

- ot great public concern and 

'■-’SSs ?*° 10 make 

."dU perhaps take 
notethat it was a .22 which 
-- cause X^ the damage in this 
case. That you were able to 
obtain the pistol and anununi- 

. . non is deplorable.” 

. Humphrey. 22. of Brixton. 

piyb London, murdered Vic- 
' Odususi, 36. wife of a 
Nigenan airline official, for no 
apparent reason as she re- 
hinted home from a prayer 
raetfing. Mrs Odususi. 34. a 

■ mother of two. was made to 

• kneel and was shot in the back 

of the head. 

The judge said: The mur- 

• der was against a woman who 

• was a complete stranger, a 
lady of whom everybody 
spoke well. It was a wanton 
and cruel killing and has 
caused immense grief." 

Wing Commander Peter 
Drissell. 40, was shot seven 
times when Humphrey and 
an accomplice. Paul Ammah. 

■ tried to mug him. The officer 
v was hurrying from the Minis- 
. try of Defence to his home in 
Claphma so that he could 
watch his favourite television 
programme. Absolutely 
Fabulous. 

Htallowed Humphrey and 
Ams*4ah to search him to 
verify his claim that he had no 
money. As they did so Carol 
Bell, 32, a betting-shop cash¬ 
ier. who was pregnant at the 
time, demanded that they 



Wing Commander Peter Drissel and his wife 








The murder of Victoria Odususi was wanton and cruel, 
said the Recorder of London. Sir Lawrence Verney 


leave him alone. “He calmly 
pointed the gun at me and 
fired." she told the Old Bailey. 
“I heard the bang. I put my 
hand down and he fired at me 
again. I could not believe what 
was happening." 

The bullets missed. In the 
split second that Humphrey 
was distracted. Wing Com¬ 


mander Drissell, who is 6ft 
Sin. threw himself at the 
gunman. He was shot at close 
range and left for dead. His 
doctor said that he survived 
only because his muscle bulk 
was considerably greater than 
average. Four of ihe bullets 
remain in his body. 

Wing Commander Drissell 


told the court: “I took a 
calculated risk, deciding 1 had 
to try to take the gun from 
him. 1 got near enough to 
touch the gun. but he pulled 
away and left me somewhat 
vulnerable. 1 was standing 
there having missed the gun. I 
crouched and. basically, he 

shot me. 

“The first two shots hit me 
in the forearm. One of them 
went into my body, passing 
through my wallet and into 
my chesL Other shots followed 
and it .seemed to be happening 
in slow motion. It seemed to go 
on for a long time.” 

Michael Perry, a disc jockey 
at Caribbean Raves, was shot 
in the wrist The bullet de¬ 
flected off a gold bracelet into 
his arm when Humphrey 
accused him of "eyeballing" 
him on Stockweil Tube sta¬ 
tion. On April 11 last year 
Humphrey fired a shot into 
the ground beside Mark Rog¬ 
ers as he was selling clothes in 
Brixton. 

As the jury returned its 
verdicts on the third day of 
deliberations. Humphrey 
stared at them and shouted. 
“Senseless racist bastards." 
Ammah. 22. of Ciapham, was 
jailed for six years for robbery 
and for possessing a weapon 
with intent to endanger life. 

Alan Newman. QC. for 
Humphrey, had pleaded that 
he not be made a scapegoat 
“for the failure of society to 
regulate its affairs by making 
it much harder for people such 
as Richard Humphrey to ob¬ 
tain guns". He added: “if guns 
could not be traded simply by 
putting personal ads in maga¬ 
zines like Gun Mart. Mr 
Humphrey would never have 
obtained the weapons which 
were used in his trail of 
destruction." 

He was a mugger and 
robber who moved up a 
league when he found how 
easy it was to buy guns 
through the small advertise¬ 
ments in Gun Mart. He 
answered an advertisement 
from John Anderson in 
Chelmsford, who wanted to 
buy a pistol. Tricked into 
thinking Humphrey had one 



.-FT* 


??.> U f * 



’ Cunard 
to pay refund 


Bv Kathrxn Knight 

CUNARD, a name synony¬ 
mous with genteel sea travel, 
was criticised for abusing its 
power yesterday by refusing to 
refund a disabled pensioner 
turned away from a cruise. 

Judge Matthewman. QC, 
condemned the “mealy- 
mouthed" attitude thaT had led 
to June Tomlinson, 62, who is 
wheelchair-bound, and her 

hus*^tid ending the EI.266 
cruiteron the Cunard Princess 
roily five hours after boarding. 

The judge told Nottingham 
County Court that it was plain 
Cunard. which has endured a 
series of embarrassments in 
recent years, had been “less 
than helpful" to the couple and 
had abused its power by 
refusing a refund. 

“I'm afraid Cunard. a once 
great and caring company, 
tried to use its contractual 
power and muscle to prevent a 
perfectly honest and decent 
woman who happened to be 
disabled and in a wheelchair 
from getting what she is 
entitled to." he said. 

Mrs Tomlinson, 62, was 
bom with spastic diaplegia. 
She had declared on her 
booking form that she was in a 
wheelchair but said that she 
could take a few steps. When 
she arrived to board the ship 
in Malaga, however, her legs 
had swollen during the long 
Journey and a doctor on board 
da jfred her unfit to travel. 

Grvins evidence, her hus¬ 
band Arthur said crew mem- 
bets had told them that if they 
sSLi on board they would 

Kveto remain m their fflbm 

for the two-week cruise 

around the Canary * 

said. Tf that’s it then weTe 

getting off. Wed,(tal spend aU 

fan money to snp “ “ 
cabin.’ ” Cunard said that the 
couple were not entitled to 


refund because Mrs 
Tomlinson’s condition had de¬ 
teriorated greatly and she had 
made dear the extent of her 
disability. 

The brochure says that the 
ship is not designed for dis¬ 
abled passengers and that 
they may find their enjoyment 
curtailed. Judge Matthewman 
said: "This seems to be one of 
die ' most mealy-mouthed 
warnings made by a suppos¬ 
edly caring company it is 
possible to find." He added 
that Cunard ■$ directors and 
medical staff might like to 
rethink their polity on dis¬ 
abled people. 

The judge ruled that the 
couple had complied with the 
terms of their contract and 
ordered Cunard to refund the 
fare with interest, and to pay 
their legal fees. 

After the hearing Mrs 
Tomlinson, of Bestwood Park, 


Nottinghamshire, said they 
had not expected to win the 
case. “I came to court with the 
attitude that I wasn’t going to 
win it. I’m just getting over the 
shock." 

Cunard has had a series of 
debacles in recent years. One 
liner was holed in the Red Sea 
and another cruise ended 
when the ship had to be towed 
to the Philippines. The com¬ 
pany had to pay £7.5 million 
compensation to passengers 
on the QE2’s first cruise after 
its refit in 1994. because the 
work had not been completed. 

A spokesman for Cunard 
offered apologies to the 
Tomlinsons. “Our concerns 
were always for her safety 
throughout the cruise. We will 
review the way in which we 
deal with future passenger 
refunds." 


Travel news, pages 20, 21 



June and Arthur Tomlinson left the cruise after 
being told that they must stay in their cabin 


tied t0 a Being UllU UUI uicj uiusi siaj m men uiuin 

kidnappings ‘are all 

rrsitv of the West of England, beds. whOe others repor 
Bristol has identified "sleep sexual encour 

L narahsis" as the likely culprit “It happei 


Top referee 
guilty of 
sex assault 

ONE of England's most expe¬ 
rienced football referees was 
convicted yesterday of inde¬ 
cently assaulting a young 
man. A year ago he was 
convicted of theft and bur¬ 
glary. 

Last October Michael Peck, 
50, a father of two and the 
Football League's former di¬ 
rector of refereeing, escaped 
with a 200-hour community 
service order after Carlisle 
Crown Court was told how he 
stole from a string of hotel 
rooms as he loured the coun¬ 
try from match to match. He 
had admitted four counts of 
burglary and two of theft but 
asked for 70 more offences to 
be taken into consideration. 

The hearing last year was 
told the burglaries and thefts 
were connected to unspecified 
personal problems he had 
been facing. 

Yesterday magistrates at 
Kendal in Cumbria were told 
how Peck met a 24-year-old 
man in a Kendal pub on April 
14 this year, invited him back 
to his house, where he pushed 
pushed him onto a couch. 

Richard Henderson, for the 
prosecution, said the assault 
happened after Peck and the 
other man had met for "a few 
drinks" in the Ring O’Belis 
pub. where they mainly dis¬ 
cussed football. But after¬ 
wards they drove to Peck’s 
home, stopping at an off- 
licence to buy a bottle of wine 
and to rent a video. The young 
man had said that once in 
Peck’s home the two talked 
about football but then Peck 
changed the conversation to 
fashion and sex. 

Peck, who was defending 
himself, denied the charge. He 
said the allegation was “but a 
figment of imagination". 

Sentencing was adjourned 
until September 2. 


a dream’ 


naralvsis is a common expert- find a scientific explanation 
^shared by up *" for what is happening 

’WO. .. 

nniis. SMS flashing UrWs “ r ' "i!”"* haw mylhs 

„ nr i senses shaking or based on the phenomenon of 
vJdderinS- Some f«* sleep paralysis: la medieval 

teve^Jeen tamed in their Britain "night demons" se¬ 


duced innocent people. In 
Newfoundland there are 
tales of an "old hag" night 
visitor and in Vietnam it is a 
"grey ghost". 

"Nowadays people are 
more likely to report that a 
four-foot tall alien with big, 
slanty black eyes took them 
from their room at night and 
whisked them oft in a space 
ship where they were operat¬ 
ed on. or sexually manipulat¬ 
ed, and returned to bed with 
an hour or two," she said. 



Richard Humphrey bought guns by answering advertisements in the magazine 
Cruii Mart. Below left is a replica of the 22. with which he shot Mrs Odususi 



for sale. Mr Anderson sent off 
his firearms certificate in com¬ 
pliance with the rules. 

Using Mr Anderson’S certif¬ 
icate. Humphrey bought guns 
and ammunition for £230 
from Malcolm Ridgeway in 
Somerset, who dispatched 
them by courier. When Mr 
Ridgeway discovered the de¬ 
ceit, he alerted the police. They 


arrived 20 minutes after Hum¬ 
phrey had signed for the 
weapons. There was no trace 
of him or the guns, save for a 
hole in the bedroom wall 
where one had been fired. 

A 10-year-old / boy who 
helped to trap Humphrey was 
given a £100 reward by the 
judge. He commended Wil¬ 
liam Taffe, who saw Hum¬ 


phrey as he shot Wing Com¬ 
mander Drissell and ap¬ 
peared as a witness. 

William rang the police and 
picked up the shells from 
Humphrey’s pistol. "He was 
an entirely self-possessed boy 
and gave valuable evidence in 
a mature manner,” the judge 
said. The money will be taken 
out of public funds. 


Boys saw 
friend, 11, 
savaged 
to death 

By A Staff Reporter 


TWO schoolboys told an in¬ 
quest jury yesterday how they 
watched Rottweiler dogs sav¬ 
age an 11-year-old friend to 
death. Anthony Pickup. 13, 
and Mark Farran, 10. said 
"three big black dogs" tore 
David Kearney apart on the 
night before Christmas Eve.. 

David, from Darwen in 
Lancashire, died 10 days later 
from his injuries. He had been 
carol singing with five friends 
when he climbed into a yard in 
an attempt to hide from a 
friend "bugging" him. 

Police said there were no 
signs warning people to be¬ 
ware of the dogs and likened 
them to a “pack of lions" that 
gave David no chance. Kevin 
Tierney, the dogs’ owner, told 
the inquest he had thought his 
6ft fence was adequate. He 
never thought the dogs could 
be killers. 

Anthony told the inquest at 
BJackbum Town Hall that he 
and Mark had managed to 
scramble back aver the fence 
when foe dogs came running, 
then watched through a gap as 
they savaged their friend. 
“The dogs jumped on him. 
One ran and got him and 
David was trying to shake 
him off. Then the other two 
followed and got him and 
pushed him on to the floor." 

In a statement read by 
police. Mark Farran had said: 
"I could see David lying on the 
ground with three dogs biting 
his legs. They ripped his shoes 
and clothes off.” 

Two of Mr Tierney’s four 
dogs. Jet and George, were 
destroyed after foe attack at 
his own request, but he insist¬ 
ed the other two had been 
inside the house at the time. 
Graham Gabbot, the vet who 
put foe dogs down, said: “I 
suggested that foe socially 
responsible thing to do would 
be to have all the dogs de¬ 
stroyed, but the owner was 
unwilling and would only give 
permission for two." 

In his often tearful testimo¬ 
ny, Mr Tierney, said he 
thought he had done every¬ 
thing possible to prevent such 
an incident. 

The hearing continues. 


Mander Portman Woodward 



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Car shown ZX Elation S 1.4i 5 door. 


It's a celebration of 0% finance over one year. + No, 
no, no. It represents free expression in the shape of a 
£500 deposit paid for by Citroen towards their Elect 3 
finance scheme! 

Whatever your interpretation, the Citroen ZX can't 
help but draw you this summer. 

Study the Special Edition ZX Elation S for instance, 
and you'll discover all sorts of hidden qualities. Like a 
driver's airbag, power steering, central locking, coded 
engine immobiliser and a stereo radio/cassette. 

Consider the clever use of light in the form of an 
electric sunroof. Admire the fine brush work in the 
metallic paint and body coloured bumpers. And marvel 


at the fact that all new ZX models come with a free 
Vodafone mobile phone* and, thanks to Citroen, no 
on the road costs. (A saving of £557.)** This means you 
don't have to pay for delivery, number plates or road tax. 

The ZX Elation S is available to drive away for as 
little as £9,990? A master stroke. 

For details about Citroen's Summer Exhibition 
contact your local dealer or freephone 0800 262 262 

CITROEN ZX 

£in*\M tor 

JUNE 1ST — AUGUST 31 ST ^ 


CAR mown CrrHOfiM ZX EU 
m APR FINANCE AVAILABLE 

MRTtCiMTMG DEALERSHIPS i 


PARTOMTMG KA1ER8MFS ONLY. FINANCE OTTOS ARE SURJECTTO STATUE AJUARAWTEEMW BE REOURCDl WHITEN CHlOTKnQWON REQUEST PROM PSA NUANCE PUL. MOUAN AV ENUE. LO NDON WC1A nOttNMtU PHONE SXN.M. TONE TEATS 

UNE RENTAL AOHEEMEME WCXINL TAHPFS WILL BE W**® AT E» PUN NAT FOR CONNECT**. AU. DETERS APPIT TO RETAIL RBRSTlUflWW OP OTOfiN ZX MODELS ORDERED AND REQBTEHEP BETWEEN R 

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^-H MES THURSDAY AUGUST 15 


HOME NEWS 


Parem^paytri bute to ‘extraordinary’ son as clergy urge greater protection in inner cities 

Murdered vicar 
accepted risks of 

urban ministry 

By Kate ALDERSnn- i-r-- .1 -_ 


ByKateauhrson 

the parents or the Rev Chris¬ 
topher Gray, the gffieS 
Church of England vicar who 
was stabbed to death outside 
tos vicarage in Liverpool, 
spoke movingly yesterday of 

fcL!± d *"* himse " ,o 

Un -P r ^ Ui P Gra y- 63. and his 
wde. Margaret. 64. from Gos¬ 
port, Hampshire, had been on 
holiday in Northumberland 
when they heard of their son's 
ty h - identified Ids 

body yesterday. 

Dr Gray said he knew- that 
bis son had been involved in 
work which carried risk. “It is 
a measure of his -character 
!wff. wasf0shi e , d os from 
the full knowledge of the risks 
Op was taking," he said during 
a news conference with his 
woe. “There was nothing we 
could do to lessen them in any 
way. He had chosen to accept 
those risks and we therefore 
had to accept his risks." 

His wife spoke only once, 
saying: “He was an extraordi¬ 
nary son and 1 adored him.“ 

Mr Gray. 32, who was 
described bv the Bishop of 
Liverpool, the Right Rev 
David Sheppard, as one of the 
most able priests of his gener- 



Christopher Gray, held 
hostage in previous job 

ation, was stabbed to death 
outside his vicarage next to St 
Margaret's Church, An field. 
He had been seen talking to a 
man outside the vicarage 
shortly before the attack. 

It was disclosed yesterday 
that Mr Gray, who became 
the vicar of St Margaret's 18 
months ago, had been burgled 
and held hostage two years 
ago by a man in another 
Liverpool parish. The attack, 
when Mr Gray was a curate, 
is understood to have come as 
he was counselling a young 


man. The assailant was jailed 
for 18 months. 

Dr Gray, who spoke calmly 
and compassionately about 
his son, said that he would be 
dreadfully missed. He said 
that he was different things to 
different people: to his parish¬ 
ioners he was a well-loved 
priest and to the academic 
community he was a scholar 
of high repute. 

He did not blame any 
organisation or place for his 
son's death. “1 think he 
probably felt that the city |of 
Liverpool! had great depriva¬ 
tion and there were many 
needs in the city, some of 
which he felt he could cater to. 

“He was very happy in 
Liverpool, he liked the people, 
the diocese. The jobs he did 
were jobs that were not imm¬ 
ediately attractive. There were 
risks to his property, to his life. 
He cheerfully accepted these." 

ftilice were questioning a 31- 
year-old man yesterday in 
connection with the murder. 
Terence Storey, from Liver¬ 
pool, was arrested in Newton- 
I e-Will ows. Merseyside, after 
a rip-off. a man and a woman 
were also arrested. 

Robert Ronde. page 16 
Leading article. page 17 



Philip and Margaret Gray yesterday. “He was an extraordinary son and I adored him." his mother said 

Call for personal alarms after second attack 


CLERGY demanded last 
night that women priests be 
given personal alarms to 
protect them against violent 
attack and urged a review of 
security for all priests. 

The call followed news of a 
second attack on a vicar. The 
Rev Nduna Mpunzi. 50, was 
in hospital with serious head 
injuries last night after being 
attacked with an axe by a man 
who had sought his help over 


marital difficulties. Mr 
Mpunzi. from South Africa, 
Is corale of St Mary and All 
Saints in Palfrey, Walsall. 

The Rev Stephen Trod, of 
the dergy section oftheMSF 
onion, wrote to Lambeth 
Palace yesterday demanding 
a working party to review 
personal security. He said 
that when be was a curate in 
Hull he had to cover his 
clerical collar with a scarf or 


coat to avoid attack. "In the 
case of female dergy. person¬ 
al attack alarms would be a 
veiy good idea." 

The Right Rev Christopher 
Hill, Bishop of Stafford, said 
that dergy might have to 
abandon inner dries if they 
did not receive urgent advice 
on security. He was backed 
by the Rt Rev Roger Sains- 
bnry. Bishop of Barking, 
who chairs an advisory group 


on urban priority areas for 
the Church. Bishop Sains- 
btny said there had been 
several incidents in the past 
five years of attacks on priests 
and their families. 

“We must have priests who 
can get out and mix with 
people, bat we need to have 
some advice and be pre¬ 
pared. I hope that we will still 
have this total commitment to 
staying in the dty." 


Icy depths of Jupiter’s moon could hold evidence of life in space 


By Nigel Hawkes, science editor 


NEW pictures of one of Jupi¬ 
ter’s moons, Europa. have 
provided tantalising hints that 
jcy Does on its surface may be 
gating on slush or even 
water. If so, Europa could 
harbour some form of life. 
Liquid water is the most 
important ingredient for fife 
and Europa could have much 
more of it than Mars. 

The new images were taken 
by the spacecraft Galileo from 
a distance of 96.000 miles. 
Scientists at a press conference 
organised by Nasa saicT they 
showed a surface dotted by a 
series of dark spofs-that could 
be the scars of geysers. 

- Galileo also produced the 


best pictures yet of la another 
of Jupiter’s moons, providing 
evidence of volcanic activity. 
The pictures show that Io has 
large red expanses, closely 
finked to recent volcanic de¬ 
posits, around a volcano 
named Pele. Other images 
show a huge plume of Mue- 
coloured sulphur dioxide ris¬ 
ing from a volcano named Ra 
Patera. 

“frs really exerting." Profes¬ 
sor Ronald Greeley of Arizona 
State University said of the 
Europa discovery. He des¬ 
cribed the surface as resem¬ 
bling “ice-floes on polar seas 
on Earth". 

The possibility that the icy 



Photographs of Jupiter's moon. Io.' showed evidence of volcanic activity 


slabs are moving around on a 
lubricating layer of relatively 
warm, mushy ice may mean 
that strong tidal forces are at 


work, cracking the crust. And. 
Professor Greeley said, the 
more geologically active Euro¬ 
pa turns out to be, die more 


likely it is to have niches that 
could harbour life. 

Europa is the fourth largest 
moon of Jupiter and ihe 


smallest to be seen by Galileo 
when he first pointed his 
telescope at the heavens in 
1610. Its diameter is almost 
1.900 miles, making it margin¬ 
ally smaller than our Moon. 

Its surface temperature, at 
-145C, is low. but the ice crust 
that covers the surface may be 
only a few miles thick. Be¬ 
neath it. according to Dr 
Ralph Lorenz of the Lunar and 
Planetary Laboratory at the 
University of Arizona, there 
may be huge oceans of water 
up to 30 miles deep. Europa is 
five times further from the 
Sun than the Earth, so if there 
is liquid water it could be kept 
that way only by radioactive 
heat from, the centre, or by 
tidal forces — the squeezing 


and stretching it gets from 
being close to Jupiter. 

Professor Greeley said that 
the new pictures, taken on 
June 27, allowed scientists to 
see “details not even suspect¬ 
ed" from pictures returned in 
1979 by the Voyager space¬ 
craft; for example, the slabs 
appear thinner than scientists 
thought. 

Galileo, launched in 1989, 
has been returning a steady 
stream of Jupiter moon close- 
ups, each opening scientists* 
eyes to new details and hints 
about geology. They are 
anxiously anticipating even, 
better pictures from a Decem¬ 
ber flyby, when Galileo will 
pass within 600 miles of 
Europa. 


Policeman 
sacked 
for assault 

A policeman based at Dews¬ 
bury, West Yorkshire, has 
been forced to resign after a 
disciplinary hearing upheld 
complaints that he had as¬ 
saulted an Asian man. He was 
charged with abuse of author¬ 
ity at a two-day police hearing. 
The Police Complaints Au¬ 
thority said it had agreed with 
the recommendation that the 
officer should be required to 
resign. 

BSE outbreak 

A new case of BSE has been 
discovered in Co Cork. The 
herd of 75 dairy cows will be 
slaughtered, as will any others 
found to have been in contact 
with the affected cow. It is the 
twenty-second case identified 
this year in Ireland. 

Canal explosion 

Two men. aged 76 and 66. 
were badly burnt when a boat 
exploded on the Grand Union 
Canal at Blisworth, North¬ 
amptonshire. One suffered 30 
per cent bums and the other 10 
per cent bums. The boat was 
destroyed. 

Vote bunkered 

The unopposed election in 
June of Carmel Murphy, a 
teacher, as first woman leader 
of Co Cork’s Ivin sale Urban 
District Council, has been de¬ 
clared invalid because it took 
place at a licensed golf dub. 
She must run for office again. 

Callers see red 

Two new red BT phone boxes, 
based on the traditional mod¬ 
els that were phased out after 
1985. went into use near West¬ 
minster Cathedral for a short 
trial. Five thousand are to be 
installed across the country at 
a cost of £5 million. 


Caroline Parr 

A report (Diary, August 6) 
stated that James Hewitt’s PR 
woman was Caroline Parr and 
that she was present through¬ 
out his mother's interview 
with Hello! magazine. Al¬ 
though Mrs Parr helped to 
organise the meeting, she does 
not represent Mr Hewitt and 
was not present at the inter¬ 
view. We apologise for the 
misunderstanding and any 
inconvenience caused to Mrs 
Parr. 




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A 


6 HOME NEWS 


RM 


the times 


c THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 


SATURDAY 


IN THE TIMES 



NENEH 

CHERRY 

Sean O’Hagan 
meets the hippest 
chick on the 
block, in the 

Magazine 

PLUS 

Weekend, Car 96, 
Weekend 
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young 77mes 
readers, and 
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IS40P ON 
SATURDAY 


Offshore wind farm stirs 
up concerns for wildlife 


By Peter Foster 


A PLAN to build the world's 
largest offshore wind farm 
two miles from the Norfolk 
coast provoked serious con¬ 
cern among naturalists yester¬ 
day, although environment¬ 
alists gave die scheme a 1 
cautious welcome. 

The D5 million develop¬ 
ment proposed by POwerGen, 
the electricty-generadng com¬ 
pany, would consist of 25 giant 
wind turbines sunk into a 
sandbank off Great Yar¬ 
mouth. Scroby Sands is used 
by up to 200 grey and common 
seals as a basking area and is 
a feeding ground for birds 
such as the little tem. 

Professor John Harwood. 


head of the Sea Mammal 
Research Unit based at St 
Andrews Universily, said die 
bank was the only basking 
area of its kind for 50 or 60 
miles. “There must be a major 
study by engineers and ocean¬ 
ographers to assess the impact 
of this development and its 
long-term effect on the sue of 
the sandbank." It was pos¬ 
sible the seals would return 
after the site was completed. 
There are seals that breed in 
The Wash on the boundaries 
of a bombing range.” 

Paul Lewis of the Royal 
Society for the Protection of 
Birds said: “We would be very 
concerned if the project im¬ 



pacted on the little tem popu¬ 
lation who use the bank for 
feeding. We would also be 
anxious to ensure the turbines 
dont affect Britain’s largest 
breeding colony of little terns 
on North Denes beach, just off 
Great Yarmouth, which is 


Power plan for Brent Spar 


By Nigel Hawkes 
SCIENCE EDITOR 

THE Brent Spar oQ platform 
could finis h its life festooned 
with windmills and wave 
power machines. The sugges¬ 
tion, by a Dutch consortium, 
is among 30 ideas being 
studied by Shell for dispos¬ 
ing of its ill-fated platform 
after plans to damp it in the 
Atlantic raised the hackles of 
environmentalists. 

Hollandia and Volker 
Stcvin Offshore, two engi¬ 
neering contractors, are be¬ 
hind the eco-friendly power 
station idea. They say that die 
upper part of Brent Spar 


should be refurbished and 
fitted with three windmills, 
cadi capable of generating 
three megawatts of electricity. 
Later, wave power genera¬ 
tors. each capable of generat¬ 
ing 0.7 megawatts, would be 
attached to the platform. 
When complete; it could gen¬ 
erate 19 megawatts of electric¬ 
ity which would be sent 
through a power line to the 
shore from a site off the west 
coast of Scotland. 

The power station is the 
most unusual of the 30 pro¬ 
posals Shell is studying, 
more than half of which are 
for on-shore dismantling or 
scrapping. 



An impression of Brent 
Spar as an energy plant 


designated a special protection 
area under European law." 

PbwerGen is seeking gov¬ 
ernment approval for the 
scheme, which could generate 
enough electricity to meet the 
daily needs of a town of56.000 
people. The Crown Estates, 
which owns Scroby Sands, 
said yesterday it was prepared 
to negotiate an agreement if 
approval was fo r thcoming. 

A spokesman for PoweiGen 
said the I90ft-high turbines 
would be sunk into the north¬ 
ern end of Scroby Sands, well 
away from the seals' basking 
area. “We have done a lot of 
environmental development 
work and have deliberately 
proposed a site which is 
always under water and not 
used by the seals." 

The Council for the Protec¬ 
tion of Rural England, which 
has campaigned against wind 
forms on the Yorkshire moors 
and the Brecon Beacons, said: 
“In principle we are not 
against a scheme which takes 
into account our previous 
objections to wind farms. It 
would not spoil the landscape 
and would be noiseless." 

Anna Stanford, energy cam¬ 
paigner for Friends of the 
Earth, said that if an environ¬ 
mental impact study gave the 
area a dean bill of health, her 
organisation would support 
the scheme. “As well as being 
beneficial for the environ¬ 
ment, wind power is an export 
and employment opportunity 
and we are delighted that a 
company is at last acting to 
develop it." 



Janette Proud shows off 17-week-old daughter Sophie, nicknamed "Stroppy 
Proud” after surviving a premature birth weighing only nine ounces, heart and 
eye operations and pneumonia. Her twin sister died at birth. Mrs Proud, a 
teacher, of Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, said: "She's a miracle" 


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Why high-tech 
Hamlet failed 
to do his turn 

BY DALYA AL8ERGE, ARTS CORRESPONDENT 

A DAY after faulty technology 
put a stop to the opening night 
of a one-man reworking of 
Hamlet, the Canadian actor- 
director Robert Lepage ac¬ 
knowledged that the reliance 
on high-tech, multi-media 
equipment was "a bi't too 
risky". V 

Elsinore, which was to have 
had a five-night run at the 
King’s Theatre, was let down 
by one of the four motors 
turning the revolve, which 
would have picked up the 
large and elaborate sets. 

Everything had depended on 
it “A remarkable synthesis of 
dazzling theatre technology 
and cinematic convention" 
was promised. 

All had been working 
smoothly during the rehears¬ 
als. Over the past six months 
of an international tour, there 
had been the occasional 
“crash-down", Lepage ex¬ 
plained. but nothing that had 
ever caused a cancellation. 

At the eleventh hour, it was 
impossible to fond an alterna¬ 
tive production to fill the 
King's Theatre. Nearly 3.000 
tickets had been sold for the 
run- It was to have been the 
British premiere of a play 
which The Times, at its Brus¬ 
sels performance, described 
as "a one-man show of beguil¬ 
ing originality”. 

Initially, an electrical fault 
was suspected, like so many 
let down by electrical faults, 
those involved in Elsinore 
discovered that it was all 
down to a spare part that was 
unavailable in this country. 

“There was no example of it 
here" Lepage said. 

Brian McMaster. director 
of the festival, was unable to 
comment on reports that the 
cancellation would cost 
£100.000. "We have an insur¬ 
ance policy,” he said. 

He emphasised that discus¬ 
sions were under way for 
Lepage to return to next year’s 
festival: "He is one of the 


great people working in the¬ 
atre today. You have to take 
an incomparable number of 
risks. Some of those risks 
don't come off.” 

The show will be seen, if not 
in Eduiburgh, on a tour that 
will 'include Nottingham, 
Newcastle upon Tyne, Glas¬ 
gow. Cambridge and at the 
National Theatre in London. 

□ One Aberdeen company at 
the festival fringe has sold 
only 55 of 22 .00 tickets for an 
U-day run of its biblical rock 
musical. The cast of 60 of Key 
is in danger of outnumbering 
the audience every night thei r 
makeshift theatre seats 200. 
Yesterday the Key booking- 
sheet showed that not one of 
the £5 tickets had been sold 
for two of the performances. 
On most nights only two or 
three people are expected. 

Derek Keith, an acoustics,; 
engineer and musician 
has written and produced 
Key. said: “We won’t let it get 
to us. We know it’s a top-notch 
show. That’s the frustrating 
part You come to the fringe 
and expect an audience." 


Festival news, page 33 



Lepage: admitted that 
show was too risky 


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AUGUST 15 1996 


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8 A LEVELS 


THE 


TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 


As the nation’s students brace for delight or despair, a veteran of post-resu lts counselling off ers advice 


Standing by with 
congratulations 
and commiserations 


By David Charter 

EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT 

AT 10 am sharp today, John 
Moore will pin up the A-ievel 
grades achieved by his 114 
pupils. 

h is a ritual he has observed 
over 13 years as a headmaster 
but he is still infected by the 
same sense of nervous excite¬ 
ment which draws students to 
The King's School. Worcester, 
from an hour or more before 
the list goes up. 

This is also a public ritual, 
one which many heads have 
abandoned for fear of upset¬ 
ting youngsters whose grades 
do not meet expectations. That 
view is not shared at The 
King’s School. 

“Some schools keep every¬ 
thing secret and only issue the 
results to individual candi¬ 
dates but I find that absolutely 
unacceptable.” says Mr 
Moore, who aims to arrive at 
730am today to begin collat¬ 
ing results. They must be 
thoroughly checked before 
they go on display. 

“This is informarion about 
the school and pupils want to 
know how their friends have 
got on. which is perfectly 
reasonable," he says. 

“I also know some pupils 



John Moore; infected 
by pupils' excitement 

will have asked a mate to look 
at their results and phone 
them through. Parents and 
members of other years will 
want to see the results out of 
interest and they have every 
right to if they are part of the 
school community." 

Mr Moore leaves his deputy 
to compile examination statis¬ 
tics used for subject analysis 
and league tables. His main 
concern roday, he says, is the 
business of congratulation, 
commiseration and advice. 

The important thing today 


is not the figures, it is whether 
the pupils have what they 
need for their next step. I know 
which universities students 
have applied to. the offers they 
have and their predicted 
grades. I probably wont check 
the whole lot until the evening 
because my first job is to deal 
with whoever walks through 
the door." 

His director of sixth form, 
careers department and pasto¬ 
ral staff are all in. 

“If someone has just missed 
the grades they need for their 
first-choice university, the first 
thing is to get hold of the 
university and see if they will 
accept them anyway,” says Mr 
Moore. "There used to be a 
request from universities that 
you should not phone until the 
following Monday but no one 
took much notice of that" The 
school will ensure that the 
pupils themselves make any 
calls to universities over the 
coming days. 

“Their university applica¬ 
tion is the first important thing 
they sign in their lives," he 
says. "It is not their parents’ 
responsibility, it is up to them 
to talk to people." 

Mr Moore worries that 
successful students are in dan¬ 
ger of being overlooked today. 



The way they were: the wait ends for pupils at a Cheshire school last year. At The King's School. Worcester, results are posted on a notice board 


both by staff concentrating on 
disappointed pupils and by 
the focus on statistics. 

"Of course. I am delighted 
when pupils do well, which 
can be four grade As or it can 
be two grade Ds and an E. 
which in some cases is a 
miracle. This is where league 
tables, particularly those con¬ 
structed on A and B grades, 
drive me spare. They imply a 
C is a failure and devalue real 
achievement. One of my best 
bits of teaching was helping a 
pupil get an E grade." 

School admissions policy 


will remain unchanged 
whether or not the school 
beners last year’s 58 per cent A 
and B grade pass rate. 

“We are in the business of 
education and will not with¬ 
draw any candidate from a 
subject because he or she 
might fail, nor will we refuse 
admission to the sixth form 
because they might get D or E 
grades." says Mr Moore. 
“They have the right to be 
educated and take an exami¬ 
nation at the end of their 
course and you are quire often 
agreeably surprised." He 


adds: “It does not bother me 
enormously if the school's 
league table position goes up 
or down because it is just one 
aspect of what a school does- 
and. arguably, not the most 
important, which is educating 
the whole pupil, producing a 
confident person who is well- 
prepared for the next stage 
and can cope with life." 

Inevitably some pupils will 
be very upset, he says. "The 
most important thing is not to 
rush into any son of decision 
on a tide of emotion immed¬ 
iately following the results." 


SCHOOL, WUrWMUl, ait — — -- 

The agony and # 
the ecstasy that 
shape our lives 


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THERE are few experiences 
in life that are inexorably 
stamped on our souls, return¬ 
ing regularly to haunt us in 
our sleep. My driving test 
once a source of terror every 
waking hour, is now but a dis¬ 
tant and vaguely smug memo¬ 
ry. Recollections of my 18th 
birthday, the supposed mile¬ 
stone of life and gateway to 
adulthood, faded almost imme¬ 
diately in a haze of alcohol. 

Bui there is one event 
whose memory will never 
leave me. never fail to induce 
a prickle of nausea in the pit 
of the stomach. Be assured, 
the day you get your A-level 
results is the day you visit pur¬ 
gatory. 

That dismally rainy Thurs¬ 
day in August 1983 began 
much as it ended — with me 
being copiously sick in my 
parents' bathroom. Several 
drinks the night before had 
not anaesthetised the feeling 
of panic and by bam the 
butterflies in my stomach had 
become a flock of birds. 

Sleep had come fitfully, 
punctuated by a conveyor belt 
of dreams about possible sce¬ 
narios tiie next day. I knew 
what 1 needed — just three Bs 
— to get into my chosen 
university. Leeds, to read 
English literature. If I feU 
short of those grades I might 
be forced in the direction of 
my second choice, a Mid¬ 
lands-based university which 
I had decided I would rather 
sell McDonalds' burgers than 
attend Everything hinged on 
that Thursday. 

Our college, a modern 
sixlh-form in Lancashire, had 
given us the choice of coming 
in person to rolled the results 
(inviting public ridicule or 
public glory) or waiting for 
them to arrive by post the next 
day (out of the question). I had 
a near-pathological haired for 
those with the cool confidence 
to wait that extra 24 hours or. 
worse, the ultra-nonchalants 


who were away on holiday 
and would “give the admin 
office a ring some time". 

I was battering down the 
door at 9am pronto, clutching 
a pen and paper to record the 
grades as if there was any 
chance that I would forget 

The college had decided 
against pinning the results^ \ 
the notice-board as a gesture 
of respect for our feelings and 
to avoid a violent scrum. 
Instead we had to queue to 
enter a small room where a 
tutor ran his finger along the 
chart and read out our grades. 

His face broadened into a 
smile as I shuffled in and J 
knew instantly that, unless he 
was some kind of sadist, it 
would be all right. “Nice 
results, nice results." he said 
amiably, in no hurry to part 
with the information. Finally 
he came out with it — 2 As and 
a B — in words which I heard 
in slow motion. 

1 made him check and re¬ 
check. pressing my nose 
against the paper, before 
being confident enough to 
walk out Then I started to cry, 
not because! was happy to be 
going to university but out of 
sheer relief that 1 would never 
have to go through this night¬ 
mare again. 

The rest of that day passed 
in a daze celebrating vf)ti 
fellow students, ending up in 
an Indian restaurant and 
being ill again at home, this 
lime not from nerves. 

It is no good anyone saying 
that you can “always take 
them again” or "I’m sure 
Sunderland Paly will be just 
as good". It isn't true. 

And today, when I hear that 
A-level passes have hit a 
record high for the 15th 
successive year and the pass 
rate has increased >6 per cent 
since 1982. 1 confess to a 
twinge of resentment that the 
exams seem to be easier. 

Why shouldn't everyone 
have to suffer like we did? 


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helplines 


■ Universities and Coile°es Admi«inn t e 
Inquiiy Line 0I242-2277SS. Information for^andi™ 
their Ucas number) on the progress of their applies 
course vacancy details; Sam to 6pm Mon to Fna^ 
Saturdays, Qarn to 5pm on Suns Aug IS and 25 Aftet 

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■ BBC Student Choice Helpline OSOU-moor 
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■ Student Awards Aecnrv , 

inquiries about grants fo B r snfoent^fmm^ ° , '? 1 ‘ 5S6 

■ Grant advice in England and W^ 1 and ' 

education authority. Wales. Call i 

■ Student Grants and Loans — inu¬ 
tile Department for Education and F^ n ? ,IOn booklel 

■ Student Loans Company. n80CM05fim ymt;n[ 0171 

■ Teletext Course Vacancy ScrTS 

Course vacancies including Higher M.',- a " neI F °ui 

■ UKCOSA (United Kingdom ^t i 0 ? 31 Diplom 

Affairs). 0171-226 3762. Loun ‘-H for Qverses 

■ ECCTIS 2000. The computer inform^.- 
libraries will run course vacancies Mr ? IOn Service 

" nAu SltiioSum 























































































































































B^B gSgg^ v^ 


15 1996 


^h modular pur- 565 and competition between the big four examiners, picking subjects 

J i.H Science C ! JM ' iU1: ™ E i996A4JEVEl RESULTS BYGRADE {t99S percentages} 

_ _ No total 

\ -^rm A * *4 1 • 5ub ^ ect _ A B C D E N U _ sat no sat 

I I ^1 Aa) Art & Design subjects 19.4 39.4 63.4 82.2 93.7 98.5 100.0 33.782 4.6 

-milt UCS IO decline ^ <%%! w 

^ MA « nnm MTAt Mu m m o\ mn ft unnni ici r~t *\ 


BiJohnOXeary 

EDUCATION EDITOR 

and David Charter 

u^h NA «! ER ? *** °onbnulng 
Sp" the sciences, in spite of 
Sirfnment-s attempt to 
P°°f the subjects, today's A- 
jevd results show. Physics. 
chemi stry and combined sci¬ 
ences all had fewer entries in 
ayear when the overall num¬ 
ber of A-level candidates 
rose. 

Ministers have been trying 
to encourage more sixtf> 
rormers to take science sub- 
JJ** 5 * to cope with the 
d«nands of die 21st-century 
labour market But the decline 
in entries accelerated this 
summer and is not expected to 
recover next year. 

Bryan Davies. Labour's fur¬ 
ther and higher education 
spokesman, said that the drop 
showed there was no room for 
complacency in the overall 
£)pdts. The number of stu- 
dente specialising in mathe¬ 
matics and the sciences had 
fallen from 30 per cent in 1984 
to less than 17 per rent this 
year. 

The increase of 1.2 per cent 
in the total number of A-levei 
oitries was lower than the rise 
in the 18-year-old population. 
More students are opting for 
vocational qualifications, 
whose results are not pub¬ 
lished until the end of the 
month. 

A rise of 1.8 percentage 
points in the proportion of 
passes at E grade and above 
shows a return to the grade 
inflation of the early years of 
the decade. The increase was 
sharper still in the A-C grades, 
which are generally consid¬ 
ered the passport to popular 
degree courses. 

The rate of increase in the 
top grade slowed, however. 

last year’s 15.6 per cent 
risihg to 16 per cent this 



matics, by 59 per cent of 
candidates, followed by 58 per 
cent in chemistry. 50 per rent 
biology and 45 per cent 
physics. 

Around 10 per cent of Eng¬ 
lish A levels completed this 
summer were modular and 
next year’s figures will include 
many more, including the first 
results from modular A levels 
in economics, geography, poli- 
foreign 


p osted: the delivery of exam results may have been 
held up by yesterday’s postal workers’ strike 


1996 A-LEVEL ENTRIES AND PASSES 

Thousands „ 

“T ~ : - 'i/T 1 


600 4. — - Number of entile* 

I 1 *• (left-hand scale) 


V • W' - \ ^ cent passes] *: a; / 

V ' > - * . j(right-hand scate)f -,.4^' 

-65 

1955 19BO 1965 1970 1975 I960 1965 1990 1995 
Sauce Want*—rCee»fcr Education and Emploiron MVig M icI i 


summer. This trend, at least 
should bring some relief to 
university admissions tutors 
trying to ration places on 
courses with high entry 
requirements. 

Some subjects, such as biol¬ 
ogy. computing, physics and 
modem languages, saw the 
proportion of A grades fall. 
But there were significant 
rises at the top level in 
religious studies, classics and 
art and design. 

Pass rates in modular A 


levels were, as predicted, 
much higher than on tradi¬ 
tional courses in the same 
subjects. However, it proved 
more difficult for candidates to 
get an A grade in three of the 
four main subjects for modu¬ 
lar entries this year. 

Modular A levels are gradu¬ 
ally being introduced for all 
subjects and allow the student 
to be examined on units of die 
course as they complete diem. 
This year, die most modular 
papers were taken in mathe- 


tics and modem foreign 

languages. 

Mathematics was the only 
subject where students on the 
new-style courses scored more 
grade As and 8s than their 
counterparts taking the whole 
examination this summer. On 
modular courses. 26.6 per cent 
of students gained an A and 
21 -1 per cent a B. compared 
with 242 per cent and 16.7 per 
cent on traditional, linear, 
courses. 

In biology. 12.4 per rent of 
students gained a modular A 
grade compared with 15 per 
rent on linear courses. "The A- 
grade rate in chemistry was 
18.7 per cent for modular and 
2D.S per rent for linear and in 
physics 16.8 per cent modular 
and 23.7 per rent linear. 

Examination boards said 
the overall pass rates reflected 
both greater motivation on 
behalf of those taking modu¬ 
lar courses, as well as their 
tendency not to register for 
final examinations if units 
already taken suggested that 
they would fail. As a result, 
candidates tended to duster in 
the middle grades. 

In mathematics, a 90 2 per 
rent pass rate was recorded on 
modular courses compared 
with 83.4 per cent otherwise. 
For biology, the modular pass 
rate was 88.9 per cent com¬ 
pared with 79.7 per cent in 
chemistry 87 2 per cent com¬ 
pared with 83.9 per cent; and 
in physics 89 J per cent com¬ 
pared with 823 per cent 


Subject _ 

Art & Design subjects 
Biology 

Business Studies 
Chemistry 
Ctaseicai subjects 

Communication Studies 

Computing 

Economics 

English 

Expressive Arts 


General Studies 
Geography 
German 
History 

Home Economics 


Mathematics 
Media/Film/TV Studies 
Music 

tOther Modem Languages 
Physics 

Political Studies 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 
t* Science 
Sociology 
Spanish 

Sport/PE Studies 
Technology subjects 


All other subjects 


19.4 39.4 63.4 82.2 93.7 985 100.0 
(18-3) (38.2) (61.4) (80.9) (93.0) (98.4) (100.0) 

13.8 32.5 51.7 69.8 84.4 93.7 100.0 

(14.3) (30.0) (47.0) (64.0) (79J2) (90.1) (100.0) 

7.7 23.1 44.5 65.6 822 913 100.0 
(7.1) (22.3) (42.8) (64.6) (81.3) (90.7) (100.0) 

19.8 40.7 59.1 74.1 88.1 94.1 100.0 

(19.3) (37.0) (53.8) (69.4) (82.4) (91.7) (100.0) 

24.9 46.5 66.9 82.8 92.1 96.1 100.0 
(235) (46.4) (67.6) (82£) (915) (96.2) (100.0) 

115 27.7 44.7 81.7 77.7 88.1 100.0 

(11.7) (29.7) (47.3) (855) (80.1) (89.8) (100.0) 

10.5 23.4 41.5 605 775 89.0 100.0 

(10.8) (23.4) (41.0) (605) (78.1) (90.1) (100.0) 
15.0 31.1 495 66.9 81.7 91.1 100.0 

(14.4) (30.0) (46.7) (635) (78.5) (695) (100.0) 

14.5 33.9 55.7 785 91.1 975 100.0 

(14.0) (32.9) (54.8) (755) (90.0) (96.5) (100.0) 

10.1 26.9 49.8 70.4 86.0 945 100.0 

(11.7) (28.1) (47.5) (67.4) (83.5) (92.8) (100.0) 

20.9 385 59.2 76.5 89.0 95.9 100.0 

(20.1) (38.4) (57.7) (75.4) (88.8) (95.9) (100.0) 
14.0 30.2 49.4 68.9 84.1 93.5 100.0 

(135) (29.7) (48.1) (67.6) (82.7) (92.4) (100.0) 

13.8 31.9 505 69.6 83.4 92.0 100.0 
(135) (30.5) (495) (67.8) (82.4) (915) (100.0) 

23.6 41.9 60.8 77.6 89.8 965 100.0 

(22.4) (41.0) (605) (76.9) (89.1) (96.1) (100.0) 

14.5 31.9 52.7 71.8 85.8 93.8 100.0 

(14.1) (31.3) (51.7) (70.8) (85.3) (93.4) (100.0) 

10.8 295 515 72.4 86.6 93.7 100.0 
(95) (24.3) (465) (68.8) (85.1) (935) (100.0) 

10.8 22.9 38.6 56.1 71.5 83.0 100.0 
(9.6) (215) (37.0) (54.7) (70.8) (82.6) (100.0) 

26.7 46.0 63.0 77.1 88.0 94.4 100.0 

(26.4) (44.6) (61 2) (75.3) <86.0) (93.4) (100.0) 

10.6 28.3 57.5 825 94.4 985 100.0 

(10.1) (275) (55.8) (80.7) (93.6) (97.7) (100.0) 
195 39.7 63.0 82.0 93.5 98.4 100.0 

(19.1) (39.0) (62.6) (81.4) (93.0) (97.9) (100.0) 
29.4 515 70.3 82.9 91.3 B5.7 100.0 

(29.9) (545) (72.9) (85.5) (92.1) (95.9) (100.0) 

20.6 39.7 57.6 73.1 855 945 100.0 

(21.3) (37.9) (54.8) (70.8) (845) (93.3) (100.0) 

14.6 35.9 575 755 885 93.9 100.0 
(13.0) (325) (54.0) (73.1) (86.1) (92.9) (100.0) 

115 28.1 46.4 645 79.4 895 100.0 

(10.8) (265) (44.5) (62.5) (78.0) (88.3) (100.0) 

14.3 34.1 57.7 77.5 89.7 95.7 100.0 

(13.1) (31.3) (54.0) (74.1) (87.9) (945) (100.0) 

11.6 26.4 475 68.5 845 93.9 100.0 

(10.9) (25.1) (435) (64.0) (81.5) (91.1) (100.0) 

10.9 26.0 42.4 595 74.6 845 100.0 
( 0.7) (24.8) (39-5) (55.5) (705) (80.5) (100.0) 

23.8 45.6 64.6 79.8 905 95.6 100.0 

(22.4) (43.2) (63.0) (78.7) (89.8) (955) (100.0) 

6.7 20.1 42.7 68.6 88.6 9B.6 100.0 
(6.8) (19.7) (43.6) (715) (90j6) (98.1) (100.0) 

12.4 265 50.6 73.5 885 965 100.0 
(12.0) (25.6) (485) (70.0) (87.0) (955) (100.0) 

17.1 415 67.7 855 965 995 100.0 
(14.3) (39.5) (64.9) (865) (96.7) (99.1) (100.0) 

12.8 305 45.8 62.0 75.7 85.0 100.0 

(12.1) (285) (44.6) (60.1) (73.7) (83.1) (100.0) 


33.782 

(33,907) 

51,894 

(51.848) 

29,100 

(26,837) 

40,455 

(42580) 

7,345 

(7,773) 

5.077 

(5,072) 

10,697 

(10,165) 

24.580 

(26,587) 

86,627 

(88599) 

9,819 

(8,984) 

27,490 

(27.497) 

63,454 

(57,468) 

42.876 
(43,436) 

10.719 

(10,624) 

43,355 

(43.479) 

2,669 

(3,025) 

11,982 

(12,092) 

67,442 

(62,195) 

8,883 

(7.056) 

6518 

(6,006) 

5,431 

(4,879) 

32,801 

(34.767) 

11,292 

(11,858 

23.877 

( 22 , 111 ) 

9,053 

(8.924) 

5,141 

(5,707) 

29.871 

(30,380) 

5532 

(4,822) 

9,732 

(7,686) 

11,061 

(10,747) 

974 

(892) 

9,934 

(10,459) 


TAD s cl an ca subtwete except 
Welsh. Cumulative Percent! 
canoBdate® gaining grade, IS 


165 34.0 53.8 72.1 855 93.6 100.0 739,163 100.0 

(15.6) (32.7) (51.7) (695) (84.0) (925) (100.0) (725,992) (100.0) 

stogy, Chemfeby and Physio. 'Modem Languages except French. German, Spanish and 
b of Subject Rewrite by Grade. Percentages have been rounded to add up to 100. % cri 
brackets 


A LEVELS 9 

is not easy 

ij Mergers 
ofboards 
increase 
rivalry 

By John O’Leary 

THE number of examination 
boards has fallen dramatically 
in the past two decades, but 
competition between those re¬ 
maining is more intense than 
ever. 

Schools and colleges are 
switching between boards at 
an unprecedented rare to give 
students the best chance of 
high grades. But teachers 
insist their choices are moti¬ 
vated more by the style and 
content of courses than per¬ 
ceived variations in standards. 

The 24 boards of 20 years 
ago had dropped to eight by 
the time the GCSE was intro¬ 
duced in 1986. The la lest 
merger, between the Oxford 
and Cambridge boards, has 
reduced the total to four in 
England, with one each for 
Wales and Northern Ireland. 

But this has coincided with 
greater competition, with the 
boards operating as business¬ 
es. The rivalry has satisfied 
Conservative requirements for 
greater choice, but even some 
examiners wonder if competi¬ 
tion is compatible with the 
maintenance of standards. 

Greater regulation has been 
introduced as the inexorable 
rise in pass rates has raised 
doubts about the consistency 
of examining. John Patten, as 
Education Secretary, brought 
in a code of practice to tighten 
procedures and give the 
School Curriculum and As¬ 
sessment Authority a monitor¬ 
ing role. 

With official reports contin¬ 
uing to find no fault with the 
current system, however, 
there has been no intervention 
on the scale seen in GCSE 
courses. Ministers are consid¬ 
ering parallel powers for the 
authority to reduce the num¬ 
ber of syllabuses as well as to 
stem the increase in subjects. 


A test of my nerves and finances as much as my offspring’s wisdom 


HERE we go again. This time; however. 

1 am an older and wiser father. Last year 
ray son. Linu s, faced up to his A lewis. 
Panic. 

Regarded by his teachers as a bright 
boy, he gave early announcement that 
the overdraft we -had spent on his 
education ted been wasted. Exams were 
not his thing, he said. After each paper te 
reded off, with IB-concealed satisfaction, 
the el ementar y errors and* worse, die 
inflammatory value judgments recorded 
under his name. 

The errors I could forgive but tire 
deliberate flouting of establishment 
views — well, it wasn’t the same in my 
day. How could he do it? I asked myselt 
How could he do it? I asked him. 

“It’s like this,” said the idle six-footer, 
placing a heavy hand on my shoulder. 
“Exams are a small part of life. What do 
they prove, after all? Those who score 
hieb marks have good memories for 

relived opinions. They are the Daleks of 


If at first they don’t succeed ... Barry Turner, a veteran 
of examination angst offers advice for parents who 
have been dreading today as much as their children 


our society. What we need is men, and 
women,” foe added hurriedly) “of spirit 
and imagination who are prepared to 
break tire mould.” 

It happened that I had work that took 
me to a remote farmhouse in Gascony 
with a capacious wine cellar. It is a form 
of escape that I recommend to any parent 
suffering from A-levetitis. Gradually the 
dark mood lifts. Sedated by gallons of 
rough red, one grows accustomed to the 
notion that of life’s many problems; A 
levels are hot a passing irritant 

1 expressed this view when Linus 
called to tell me how much he was 
enjoying what be described as his year 
out before going to university. “Hang 


on,” I said. “You aren't going to 
university. Remember? Those A levels? 
Failures, every one, according to you.” 

“I wouldn't worry about it. pops.” (1 
wish he wouldn't call me that) “ Ill scrape 
together a few passes to see me through.” 

Came the day. Dulwich College fol¬ 
lows the sadistic tradition of posting A- 
level results on the noticeboard. a 
practice reminiscent of the medieval 
habit of displaying severed heads on 
pikes at the city gate. Linus. 1 assumed, 
would be at the front of the crowd, eager 
to put himsdf and his parents out of 
agony. When 1 rang he was nowhere to 
be found. His sister, Sally, wbo inhabits 
another world akin to but not actually 


joined to this one. thought he might have 
gone somewhere with a girlfriend. 

“But what about his A leveteT* I waded. 
“What A levels?" she asked sweetly. I 
rang the school; yes. the A levels were up 
on the board but. no, they were not at 
liberty to tell me what, if anything. Linus 
had gained because they could not be 
sure of my identity. “But I am his father, 
you know, the one who pays the fees.” 

That evening Unus rang to say that he 
had three grade As and a B. He sounded 
dejected. When I asked to know what 
was wrong, he confessed that he had 
expected straight As. “Why on earth 
didn't you tell me that before?" 

“I didn't want to build up your hopes." 

Now it is Sally's turn. She goes, or 
rather went to Alleyn’s, the sister school 
to Dulwich College, where she was 
blessed with a form teacher of such 
patience, sympathy and fortitude that his 
name deserves to be recorded for 
posterity. Stand up. please. Mr Kingman. 


and take your bow. Sally, as I intimated 
earlier, is inclined to drift off at critical 
moments. In consequence, she is brilliant 
at starting examinations but none too 
good at finishing them. Her results will 
depend on marks scored for flashes of 
inspiration. 

I remain calm- No longer the nervous 
supplicant at the A-level tables. I follow 
Kipling to meet my children’s triumphs 
and disasters, “And treat those two 
imposters just the same”. 

I begin to think that Linus was right 
first time. Exams are not that important 
There are occupations that are free of 
academic encumbrance. Scouring the 
prospectuses for opportunities for career 
women, I find that a pig enterprise 
management course at the Scottish 
Agricultural College has a requirement 
ofjust one E grade at A level. And it does 
not even specify a subject 

Excuse me. I must have a chat with my 
daughter. 



Hard-learnt lessons: Barry Turner 
with his children Linus and Sally 



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A-level dropouts find AS 
is not an easy option 

By David Charter, education correspondent 


A LARGE rise in the take-up 
of AS levels, which cover half 
the material of an A level, was 
this year accompanied by a 
sharp drop in the pass rate. 
Examination boards said 
more students were turning to 
the course expecting it to be an 
easier option than a foil A 
level, but were finding the 
standards expected were just 
as high. 

The number of AS levels 
taken was swollen by students 
who began modular A levels, 
where units of the course are 
examined once they are com¬ 
pleted. but decided to switch 
because early units put them 
off the foil A level. 

The School Curriculum and 

Assessment Authority said 

yesterday it would be consult¬ 
ing from September on re¬ 
vamping the AS level, which is 
at present a two-year course, 
to make it easier. 

Sir Ron Dealing, chairman 
of the authority, who last year 
chaired a major review of 
exam qualifications for the 
Government, suggested stu¬ 
dents should be able to take 



Dealing: proposed 
one-year AS levels 

AS levels in a year, and that 
the standard should match the 
work expected in the first year 
of A-level study. 

There was an 11 per cent rise 
in AS-levd entries this sum¬ 
mer but a fall in passes on the 
58.297 papers by 2.4 per cent 
Kathleen Tattersall. chief 
executive of the Northern Ex¬ 
aminations and Assessment 


Board and chairman of the 
Joint Forum for the GCE and 
GCSE, said: “Sir Ron Dearing 
proposed an AS-levd stan¬ 
dard lower than A level and 
like the first year of A level, 
taken in one year so it could be 
the stepping stone to a foil A 
level. This year’s figures point 
to the need for that intermedi¬ 
ate examination because of the 
difficulty of students achieving 
at the same standard as A 
level." 

This year's extra entries 
came mostly in subjects avail¬ 
able as modular A levels. 
There were 465 per cent more 
mathematics papers taken, 
chemistry was up 33.7 per 
cent, physics 27.1 per cent and 
biology 21.1 per rent. 

Mrs Tattersall added: “This 
is the first rise in AS levels for 
a number of years. In those A- 
level subjects where there is a 
modular option, candidates 
have derided to try for AS level 
but it may very well be they 
have a mistaken view that 
they are going to find the AS 
level easier, because it is at the 
full A-level standard." 




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10 ROMAN BRITAIN , _ the times thursda;)_aug» st is im 

The splendours of Fishboume Palace are evidence of how quickly the British adopted 


Sumptuous reward for 
a co-operative chieftain 


By Emma Wilkins 


FOR King Cogidubnus, chief 
of the local British tribe, it was 
home. For anyone else, the 
Roman palace at Fishboume 
was a feat of engineering and 
craftsmanship that displayed 
beyond doubt the superiority 
of a conquering race. 

The palace, built some time 
around AD 75 just a few miles 
to the west of Chichester, 
boasted more than 100 rooms, 
including a bath-house, audi¬ 
ence chamber and pleasure 
gardens. The landscaped es¬ 
tate occupied a site of some 
ten acres, running down to a 
private harbour with sea 
views. 

The palace itself, at 
250.000 sq ft was on a scale 
matched only by Nero's Gold¬ 


en Palace in Rome and would 
have cost about £8 million in 
today's money. While there is 
much debate over its history, 
the most likely occupant was 
Cogidubnus, chief of the 
Atrebates tribe. 

The tribe’s previous chief. 
Verica, had Bed to Rome 
seeking the help of the Em¬ 
peror Claudius against hostile 
British neighbours. Once the 
threat to territory in Sussex 
and Hampshire was re¬ 
moved. the Atrebates re¬ 
mained friendly with the 
Empire. 

After the invasion of the 
Roman army In AD 4A. 
Cogidubnus was made one of 
Rome's client kings and was 
allowed to keep his territory 


tv- ws® sr- M 


in return for peaceful co¬ 
operation with the imperial 
forces. 

David Rudkin, director of 
Fishboume Palace, said: “The 
magnitude of this palace is a 
huge indication of Roman 
power. Anyone who came 
here would be in no doubt 
about the influence of the 
Empire.” It reveals many 



A recreation of the first-century garden at Fishboume, with box hedge borders 


secrets about the relationship 
between conquerors and con¬ 
quered. many of whom quick¬ 
ly and willingly adopted the 
Romans' superior culture. 

When building began, local 
craftsmen were not sophisti¬ 
cated enough to produce 
high-quality work, so interior 
dexorators were brought in 
from GauL The mosaics they 
produced can be seen in the 
original settings, buckled by 
land movement but recognis¬ 
able as patterns, in a covered 
building over the northwest 
wing. 

Visitors can see the best 
example of a first-century 
Roman garden in Britain, 
with a formal arrangement of 
box hedges laid out within the 
villa’s wills. 

One due to the histoiy of 
die garden came from a plant 
pert, which was found to have 
four holes around the top. 
near the rim. According to an 
account by Pliny, these pots 
were designed to give plants 
air during transportation. 

"It’s likely that the plants 
here were brought ail the way 
across the empire from Italy 
and France,” Mr Rudkin said. 
“It’s a lavish way to stock the 
garden and a good indication 
of the sophistication of the 
society.” 

Outside the villa, archaeolo¬ 
gists believe they may now 
have found a water garden 
with fountains, waterfalls and 



'A # * 



Bignor contains the best surviving mosaics in Britain, discovered in 1811 by a farmer ploughing his fields ^ 


colonnades which they hope 
to excavate soon. Although 
the palace was built on the site 
of a small military settlement, 
the garrison had moved to 
Chichester by the time the 
villa was begun. 

There were big changes 
around AD 90, probably after 
the death of Cogidubnus. 
New residents moved in. 
among them blacksmiths and 
bakers, to judge by the re¬ 


mains of kilns and mens 
found during excavations. 
Partition walls were driven 
through the origins} rooms. 
splitting the mosaic floors but 
providing living space for 
scores of families. 

Fishboume’s original de¬ 
signer was so confident of the 
friendliness of the natives that 
the palace was built without 
defences. This optimism 
proved misguided 200 years 


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later when the palace was 
looted and burnt to the 
ground, probably by pirates 
marauding along the South 
Coast 

By that time. British crafts¬ 
men had learnt to copy the 
Roman style. The villa at 
Bignor. on the South Downs 
outside Chichester, had be¬ 
gun as a modest first-century 
farm, but was substantially 
redecorated in sumptuous 
style 200 years later. It boasts 
the finest surviving mosaics 
in Britain, including an 82ft- 
long. beautifully preserved 
corridor which runs the 
length of the garden wall. 

Historians believe that the 
owner was a Romano-British 
merchant who made his for¬ 
tune from the wool trade and 
moved from Chichester to the 
countryside. However, others 
believe that the erotic mosaic 
of Ganymede and the eagle, 
which is almost perfectly pre¬ 
served in the summer dining 
room, is an indication that the 
villa was once an upmarket 
brothel. 

According to Greek myth, 
the gorgeous youth Gany¬ 
mede was raped by Zeus who 
came to him in the shape of an 
eagle. The Roman version of 
the story is less racy: Gany¬ 
mede. a shepherd, was 
fetched by an eagle to become 
a cupbearer to the gods. 

The central panel of the 
mosaic is surrounded by 
scantily dad maidens, skip¬ 
ping about a circle and wav¬ 
ing their veils, which lends 
some credence to the theory. 
Jerry Compton, the custodian 
of the villa, demurs: “I don’t 
favour the brothel idea, but 
the villa may have been used 
as a hunting lodge at one 
time. We know that a lot of 


prosperous people moved out 
of Chichester to live in the 
country at the appropriate 
time. It’s more likely to have 
been the home of a rich 
merchant” 

The excavations at Bignor 
began in 1811 when a farmer. 
George Tupper. struck a large 
stone while ploughing one of 
his fields. A leading antiquary 
from London was soon on the 
scene, directing the digging. 

The thatched building, 
which was constructed in 1813 
to cover the mosaics, is so fine 
that it is listed as a National 
Heritage scheduled monu¬ 
ment The site is still owned 
by the Tupper family, who 
rely solely on entrance fees for 
the upkeep of the villa. 

O Fishboume Palace is open 
daily from February 12 to 


InSHBOUHNEl, 


-A298,.- 
. . tea 


; ■f' i - r - -. • • jhi Chichester 
■ \ ; y*2? --1- . _ 




December 13 (Sundays only 
from January 7 to February 11 
and December 15-29). Open¬ 
ing hours are IOam to 5pm. 
6pm in August Inquiries: 
01243 785859. 

Bignor is open from March 
to May, 10am to 5pm (dosed 
Mondays except Bank Holi¬ 
days) and June to September. 
10am to6pm daily. In October 
it is open from 10am to 5pm 
but dosed on Mondays. In¬ 
quiries: 01798 869259. 


Tomorrow: Lincoln and Caistor St Edmund 


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™I!ME imUBSDAYM,r.„ CT ,., m . _ 

Truce shattered as 
Russian jets blast 
Chechen refugees 

TWL^iwtantod sharply ” 


ba ^ sharply 
fefore diving towards their 
VKtiras below, unleash in" a 
salvo of rockets into thc ? b^ 
daggled refugee trait and 
leaving smoke billowing Cl 
where they had scored di™ 

.The refugees, who had 


Richard Beeston reports 
from Grozny on the plight of 
civilians after yet another 
dubious ceasefire is flouted 


Annoiit , 'J* vv,, ° naa -- 

right-day Sn'te wh~ S’ my rar “ d 

ny. fled do™? the™3 ?™k uS ™ ned b ° mbin 8- 
dragging young children be. ra E dorova. a dis- 

hind them and balancing their L r P h rajjdle-aged woman, 
belonging unto' SRSS by «*- 

wWchTad 'SSJSJ'S «flSSS“ ** — 
sions would allow ** t "° rnen uere Ir ring to 

gfigss 

“ n '“ ". ,a - 
&2 ¥-s ssir sbrapnei and 

Sukhoi 25 ground-attack jets -They sav there is 

Tnri Slv °r Glkal ° oa> “ asefi ra. thin exactly when 
Rve mmute ® the refugee rush hour begins 

more than a Magnmadova. a representa- 
which have left tive from the local administra- 

an . d rion - "n«y are completely 
civilians dead and thousands inhuman. It is a moral out- 
wounded. 1 just managed to rage.” Yesterday's artack on 


French police say 
runway raiders 
may be in Spain 

From Ben Macintyre in Paris 


GUNMEN who escaped with 
up to £500,000 in cash after 
robbing an aircraft at Pferpi* 
gnan airport in the south of 
France may have escaped to 
Spain, police said yesterday. 

The raid was carried out in 
daylight moments after Air 
France Europe Flight 5245 
tc^ihed down from Paris on 
Tuesday evening- The aircraft 
was carrying 167 passengers, 
six crew and a Brink’s security 
shipment of French bank¬ 
notes. As the Airbus A320 
taxied, at least four hooded 
men armed with rifles and 
handguns used two vehicles to 
block the runway. Then they 
held up a banner reading: 
“Shut off your engines and 
open the hold”. 

The raiders fired three or 
four shots, one of which re¬ 
portedly hit the nose of the 
aircraft. They, then removed 
two sacks of cash before 
driving off at high speed. 
Initially they were thought to 
have taken Fr4 million, but 
detectives said later that the 
cash was in pesetas, and 
would nor say how much. The 
raid was over in less than four 
minutes. A spokesman for Air 
France Europe said as many 


as ten men may have taken 
part in the hold-up. 

A police officer said: This 
was a commando operation 
carried out by the hand of a 
master criminal.'’ 

The robbers appear to have 
headed west on the main 
autoroute to Foix but. the 
police said, they could have 
doubled back along minor 
roads and crossed the Spanish 
border 20 miles hum Perpi¬ 
gnan. Under the Schengen 
agreement, the border be¬ 
tween Spain and France is 
open, with only occasional 
spot checks. 

A police search was under 
way yesterday and the au¬ 
thorities asked anyone to come 
forward who might have seen 
the robbers. 

They gained access to the 
airport runway by forcing the 
lock on a perimeter gate on the 
far side of the airport from the 
main entrance. A small copse 
of oaks just outside the fence 
ensured that their vehicles 
were not seen from the control 
tower, more than a mile away. 

Before escaping, the robbers 
blocked the gate with two vans 
to hinder pursuit then trans¬ 
ferred to a third vehicle. 


Mitterrand 

monuments 

tarnished 

By Ben Macintyre 

TWO of the “grand works” 
initiated by the late President 
Mitterrand have come under 
attack this week amid claims 
that the restored Tufleries 
gardens have become a fair¬ 
ground and the new Oplra 
Bastille is falling apart 
The Jardin des Tufleries, 
the great 16th-centuiy park of 
the French kings designed by 
Andre Lc Nfitre in the heart of 
Paris, has been overrun by 
tourist attractions, according 
to critics of the Socialist 
leader's grands travaux. 

Alongside the elegant paths 
and flowerbeds can be found 
a vast Ferris wheel, an ice¬ 
rink. restaurants seating up to 
1,500 people, food stalls and 
shooting galleries. 

The city authorities say that 
they cannot afford to pay the 
gardeners without renting out 
parts of the park to vendors 
and side-shows. 

Meanwhile, the ultra-mod¬ 
em Opera building at the 
Bastille, which was completed 
in a huny to allow M Mitter¬ 
rand to preside over its grand 
opening in 1989. is already 
showing signs of serious wear 
and tear. Stones on the facade 
are beginning to crack and 
last month a steel plaque 
came loose. 


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EUROPEAN NEWS 11 


the southern district of Gekalo 
may have been tire worst of the 
day, but it was not an isolated 
incident. Elsewhere in Greeny 
helicopter gunships again 
went into action ami Russian 
mortars were fired into a 
residential area, killing two 
boys. 

“We have had our order 
since 0800 to hold our fire and 
lhat is what wc have done." 
said Ahmed Zakayev, a senior 
rebel commander in charge of 
the southern district of Groz¬ 
ny. “As you can see. the 
helicopters are still flying 
overhead and the warplanes 
are still bombing.” 

The Russian side seemed 
genuinely in disarray over 
whether or not it had agreed to 
a ceasefire and. if so, what the 
conditions were. General 
Konstantin Pulikcvsky. the 
commander of Russian forces 
in Chechenia and the sup- 



M asked Russian police officers search a car in Nazran, a town on the road to Grozny, the Chechen capital 


posed signatory of the deal, 
confirmed that he had agreed 
to "suspend fighting" hut de¬ 
nied ever concluding a formal 
truce. 

Aslan Maskhadov, the 
Chechen military commander 
and General Pulikovsky’s ne¬ 
gotiating partner, gave a 
warning that the conse¬ 
quences of yesterday’s viola¬ 


tions could have severe reper¬ 
cussions, particularly for Gen¬ 
eral Aleksandr Lebed, the 
Kremlin security chief and the 
man charged with ending the 
20-monih conflict in 
Chechenia. 

”[f Lebed cannot pull off a 
ceasefire like this, then what 
hope can there be for peace?" 
the Chechen military chief 


said. At a checkpoint south of 
Grozny, drunken Russian 
troops did not seem to know or 
care. “No one has given us any 
new' orders." said Aleksandr, 
a young lieutenant, as his men 
looted a Chechen car full of 
boxes of cigarettes. 

□ Moscow: Army units have 
been firing indiscriminately at 
civilians fleeing the fighting. 


the pro-Moscow Chechen 
Government said yesterday 
fThomas de Waal writes). Its 
mission in Moscow said 29 
people, including some child¬ 
ren. had been killed when a 
Russian warplane fired at a 
Jony in the town of 
Gudermes. Elsewhere, six 
mourners in the north were 
killed by fire from a plane. 


Phoenician city found near Malaga 


By Tunku Varadarajan 

SPANISH archaeologists 
have unearthed the site of the 
biggest Phoenician settlement 
discovered so far on the Iberi¬ 
an peninsula, dating to at least 
the 8th century BC. 

The site, which the elated 
archaeologists say was once "a 
teeming dty”, lies at Cerro del 
ViUar, an unassuming hillock 
situated between the dty of 
Malaga and the nearby 
Guadalhorce river. 

The Phoenicians were 
among the first foreign 
colonisers of the southern 
coast of “Spania", or “the 
hidden land” as they chris¬ 
tened the peninsula. Among 
their distinguished achieve¬ 
ments was the founding in 
1100 BC of Gadir, later to 
become Cadiz. They also 
founded settlements at Adra. 
VUIaricos and Almuhecar, as 
well as some near Malaga. 


S P A I; N 
R Gu&dalhorde • 
TocremoTinos-^. 


Li 


Mala g a 


—-- Cerro dot VIBarf 
' Mart** 3 so\ •- 

40 I Mediterranean 

CO*** Sea 

Since virtually nothing sur¬ 
vives today of Phoenidan Ga¬ 
dir, the site at Cerro del Villar 
provides scholars with a view 
into the urban ways and 
methods of the enterprising 
seafarers from Tyre who set¬ 
tled in Spain, attracted by its 
fishing grounds and the pur¬ 
ple dye of its shellfish. 

The archaeologists had 
speculated initially that the 
remains at Cerro del Villar 


might have been of the ancient 
dty of Mainake. also believed 
to have been near modem 
Malaga, which was built in 
the 7th century BC by the 
Phodans. a people from cen¬ 
tral Greece. But the settlement 
is at least a century too old to 
have been anything else but 
Phoenidan. 

According to Maria Euge¬ 
nia Aubet. the director of the 
dig. Cerro del Villar has 
exceeded “beyond all imagina¬ 
tion” the archaeologists’ expec¬ 
tations. She said: “We thought 
initially we had found a small 
Phoenidan settlement of 
around two hectares (nearly 
five acres), of the kind that is 
not uncommon. Later, we 
realised that what we had 
before us were the remains of 
a dty in which perhaps a 
thousand people once lived." 

The dty. whidi was up to 15 
hectares in size, is described 
by Dr Aubet as haring “im¬ 


pressive rectilineal streets, pla¬ 
zas and an internal organis¬ 
ation that seems very 
modem". Her team, from 
Barcelona's Pompeu Fabra 
University, has found evi¬ 
dence of large ovens, used for 
the manufacture of ceramics, 
and a residential zone, “where 
some of the more luxurious 
houses had eight or nine 
rooms and central patios". 

Apart from their recognised 
skill as sailors and glass- 
blowers. the Phoenicians from 
Iberia had. it seems, a reput¬ 
ation for sensuality. The 
Roman poet Martial, who 
lived several centuries after 
the dty was in its Phoenidan 
pomp, refers approvingly in 
his epigrams to “girls from 
wanton Gadir. who with end¬ 
less prurience, swing lascivi¬ 
ous loins in practised 
wri things". 

Leading artide, page 17 


Free a 







HALFSRDS 


N°7 


Doubts 
grow over 
election 
in Bosnia 

By Eve-Ann Prentice 

DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENT 

TENSION over next month's 
Bosnian election intensified 
yesterday as the head of the 
organisation running it ex¬ 
pressed deep doubts about its 
fairness, and an influential 
think-tank called for the vote 
to be postponed. 

Warren Christopher, the 
American Secretary of State, 
meanwhile held a series of 
reportedly fraught meetings 
with the leaders of the Serbs. 
Croats and Muslims as he 
tried to win promises of more 
co-operation to enable the 
elections to be free and fair. 

At the Geneva meeting. 
President Tudjman of Croatia 
renewed pledges that the trou¬ 
blesome Bosnian Croat mini- 
state of Herceg-Bosna would 
be dismantled. But American 
officials expressed caution 
because earlier pledges have 
nor been fulfilled. 

The call for a postponement 
of the elections came from the 
International Crisis Group, 
which includes Thorvald 
Stoltenberg, the veteran Bal¬ 
kan negotiator, and several 
former Prime Ministers, and 
is chaired tty former US 
Senator George Mitchell, who 
also chairs the Northern Ire¬ 
land talks. The group said 
conditions for the September 
14 poll were “totally unaccept¬ 
able" and that going ahead 
would do more harm than 
good. 

Nicholas Hinton, president 
of the group, said: “The conse¬ 
quences will be extremely 
damaging for Bosnia-Herze- 
gorina and could mark the 
end of the peace process.” 

Doubts about the fairness of 
the poll were also expressed by 
Flario Cotti, head of the Org¬ 
anisation for Security and Co¬ 
operation in Europe, which is 
organising the elections. He 
was later due to meet Mr 
Christopher after his talks 
with Presidents Tudjman, 
Izetbegoyic of Bosnia and 
Milosevic of Serbia. 

Meanwhile, the Muslim- 
Croat assembly in foe Bosnian 
dty of Mostar elected a Croat 
Mayor and Muslim Deputy 
Mayor at its first joint session. 
It also emerged that a heavily 
outnumbered Nato team en¬ 
countered Ratko Mladic, com¬ 
mander of the Bosnian Serb 
Army, at the weekend but did 
not try to apprehend him. 

















12 AMERICA 


TT men AY AUGUST 15 1996 
tuf TIMES THURSPjLL^-- 


Tax-change fanatics pledge to cut 12 hours of form-filling to five 


ByTimHames 

LIFE for defeated presidential can¬ 
didates at the party convention is 
not normally enjoyable. Obliged 
for the sake of form to show up. 
they are either anonymous figures 
or sulk on the edge of events, as Pat 
Buchanan has done. 

In years past they were rewarded 
with a speaking slot, occasionally 
in prime time. Not so in San Diego. 
The best they get is a small 
appearance on a party video heavi¬ 
ly scripted by the Dole campaign 
handlers. All but one of the ten men 
who opposed the eventual victor 
are having little impact. 


The exception is Steve Forbes 
and supporters of the flat tax. So 
great is his presence you could be 
forgiven for thinking he had won 
the presidential nomination. Bob 
Dole is now committed to a 
package of tax cuts as the first stage 
towards a “flatter, fairer, simpler" 
system. Jack Kemp, guru of supply- 
side economics and the only serious 
politician to endorse Mr Forbes, is 
the highly popular running-male. 

Mr Forbes is scheduled to attend 
dozens of events and has had scores 
of interviews. The $37 million (£23 


million) he personally spent during 
the .campaign now looks a better 
investment than it did six months 
ago. He is supplemented by a 
torrent of activity from Citizens for 
a Sound Economy, the 250.000- 
member group most associated 
with his cause. Its predominantly 
young supporters are everywhere 
in San Diego, festooned with 
balloons, stickers and T-shirts ex¬ 
claiming “Annoy the IRS" (the 
Internal Revenue Service) and 
“Support the Flat Tax!” and distrib¬ 
uting oversized badges with the 
same message to eager delegates. 

Their party at the Planet Holly¬ 
wood restaurant today hosted by 


Mr Forbes and Dick Armey, sec¬ 
ond in command to Newt Gingrich 
in the House of Representatives, is 
the glamour outing of the week. 
They have swamped the CNN 
television station with commercials 
arguing that their proposals would 
put Washington’s detested lobby¬ 
ists out of business. These flat-tax 
fanatics believe that they represent 
the Republican future. 

They may be right Their pos¬ 
ition is the logical extension of the 
party’s hostility to tax and regula¬ 
tion. Its strength is the almost 
universal loathing felt for the 
present US tax system. This pro¬ 
duces some 480 tax forms. The 


standard document used by most 
citizens requires an average of 12 
hours' work to fill in. It is estimated 
that the eight billion pieces of paper 
produced by the IRS need nearly 
six billion man-hours to complete 
at an estimated cost of $200 billion. 

The alternative backed by Mr 
Forbes. Mr Armey and Richard 
Shelby, an Alabama senator, 
would be radically different. All 
Americans would receive generous 
personal allowances — $11350 for 
single people and $22,700 for 
married couples — plus a further 
$5,300 per child. In return, there 
would be no deductions or loop¬ 
holes. All income above these 


fioures would be taxed at a single L more spedficJEnlh- 

ner cent rate. A family with Hao believe that Mr hemp, if 

children earning up to Viec-Presidenr. would ensure that 

would pay zero federal income rax ^xqo election was fought an 
At $50,000. they would owe on implementing that package. 

S30 Its backers believe ihi* ir ina [Iv. an element of compro- 
generous Treatment of lower in- ^ ]ibQUgh Americans are 

comes would offset the charge that " ^ ^ ^ ^cept. they would 
one band favours the rich. The w lose wo very popular 

income tax form could be reduced ^, owance s. those for mortgage 
to postcard size and dealt with m £ payment and change 
under five minutes. Money from in nrribut } ons . Tins would slightly, 

savings or investments would be con ^ of the programme, 

taxed only once. ... h ,, politics dictates adjustments. 

For the flat tax ro prosper swiftly b po^ uin or ipse in 1996. 

requires three factors. First, a £ bljcan Merest in the ultimate 

Republican Pres,dent Srcmd I. ^ u |ikd > 1o endure, 

the imprecise promise M r Dole nas «*- 


Dole aides plot 
ways to exploit 
the Powell factor 

From Martin Fletcher in san diego 


AS THE Republican Party 
convention prepared formally 
to anoint Bob Dole as its 
presidential nominee last 
night, his aides were plotting 
ways to boost his electoral 
appeal by exploiting Colin 
Powell. 

One idea was to unveil key 
members of a Dole Cabinet 
prior to November’s election, 
if the hugely popular retired 
black general could be per¬ 
suaded to accept the job of 
Secretary of State. Another 
reported possibility was to ask 
Jeane Kirkpatrick. President 
Reagan’s UN Ambassador, to 
be Secretary of Defence to 
improve Mr Dole's lowly 
standing among women. 

General Powell is America's 
most popular public figure, 
and he brought the convention 
to its feet with an electric 
speech on Monday night, but 
how far he is prepared to go to 
help Mr Dole is not dear. 

He turned down the job of 
Secretary of State when Presi¬ 
dent Clinton offered it to him 
in 1994. He joined the Republi¬ 
can Party in 1995. but refused 
to be Mr Dole’s running-mate 
and said before the convention 
that he did not plan to cam¬ 
paign actively for the Republi¬ 
can ticket this autumn. He 
was known to be unhappy 
about Mr Dole's opposition to 
affirmative action program¬ 
mes designed to counter racial 
discrimination. 

General Powell was said to 
be genuinely excited by Mr 
Dole's selection of his friend. 
Jack Kemp, as running-mate 
last Saturday because Mr 


REPUBLICAN 
CONVENTION ‘96 

Kemp has a long record of 
concern for America's racial 
and inner-city problems. But 
in an interview with yester¬ 
day’s Los Angeles Times, Mr 
Kemp conspicuously softened 
his earlier support for affirma¬ 
tive-action programmes, lest 
he appear out of step with Mr 
Dole. 

Mr Dole’s formal nomina¬ 
tion last night marked a new 
milestone in a political career 
spanning nearly half a century 
that has included two earlier 
bids for his parly’s nomina¬ 
tion and an equally unsuccess¬ 
ful White House bid as Presi¬ 
dent Ford’s 1976 running- 
male. 

Cribbing from the Demo¬ 
crats, who produced a video 
called TTie Man From Hope 
that transformed Bill Clinton's 
image during the party’s 1992 
convention, convention or¬ 
ganisers have prepared a pow¬ 
erful film biography of Mr 
Dole. Elizabeth Dole was ex¬ 
posed to break all precedents 
by wandering among the dele¬ 
gates on the floor with a 
microphone in her hand and 
talking about her husband. 
Mr Dole's daughter, Robin. 


was introducing him from the 
podium. 

Mr Dole will formally ac¬ 
cept the nomination tonight 
with the most important 
speech of his life, and from 
that moment he becomes eligi¬ 
ble for nearly $70 million (£45 
million) in federal funds. His 
campaign has been virtually 
penniless since March, while 
Mr Clinton has been able to 
spend nearly $30 million on 
commercials. 

Tuesday night's session was 
devoted to pillorying Mr Clin¬ 
ton for “broken promises” on 
taxes, welfare and the budget 
“Bill Clinton’s promises have 
the lifespan of a Big Mac on 
Air Force One," quipped Su¬ 
san Molinari, the young New 
York congresswoman who 
was the keynote speaker. 

Newt Gingrich, the House 
Speaker, made a brief appear¬ 
ance in which he argued that 
“our philosophy represents 
the most compassionate, char¬ 
itable and hopeful vision for 
America today". But the most 
powerful defence of a Republi¬ 
can agenda widely perceived 
as harsh came from J.C. 
Warts, a former professional 
football player from Oklaho¬ 
ma and one of the party's two 
black congressmen. 

Unlike the Democrats. Re¬ 
publicans “don’t define com¬ 
passion by how many people 
are on welfare or living in 
public housing”, he declared. 
“We define compassion by 
how few people are on welfare 
and public housing because 
we have given them the means 
to dimb the ladder of success.” 



Diana Acompo, a Californian delegate at the convention, with a Bob Dole puppet 


General sees economic power as key to American dominance 


From Tom Rhodes 

IN WASHINGTON 

IT WAS almost midnight on a 
Saturday evening in Decem¬ 
ber 1994 when General Colin 
Powell received a telephone 
call from President Clinton 
asking the former chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff to drop 
into the White House for a 
chat The following day Mr 


Clinton offered the general, 
the Gulf War military leader, 
and perhaps the hottest polit¬ 
ical property in America, the 
role of Secretary of State to 
replace Warren Christopher. 

Mr Powell told the Presi¬ 
dent that for personal rea¬ 
sons. he wanted no further 
involvement in public office. 
“Left unspoken were my reser¬ 
vations abouL the amorphous 


way the Administration han¬ 
dled foreign policy, a style 
with which I was already 
familiar." Mr Powell wrote in 
his autobiography. My Ameri¬ 
can Journey. “I did not see 
how I could fit back into this 
operation without changes so 
radical that the President 
would probably have difficul¬ 
ty making them.". 

Now, it seems, the retired 


general is once more bring 
considered for the premier 
foreign polity post in an 
American government led by 
Bob Dole. 

In the early years of the 
Clinton presidency. Mr Powell 
ploughed a furrow of caution 
at the Pentagon. Even friends 
viewed the Powell doctrine as 
too cautious on the use of 
force. 


Despite his obvious commit¬ 
ment to the Pentagon over 35 
years, Mr Powell has always 
seen himself as being more 
suited to the role of. Secretary 
of State. 

He firmly believes that the 
United States is the leader of 
the Western world and the 
foundation upon which na¬ 
scent democracies in Eastern 
Europe wish their security to 


rest But he still views econom¬ 
ic dominance as the most 
successful lever for peace. "In 
this new world, economic 
strength will be more impor¬ 
tant than military' strength." 
he writes. “The new order will 
be defined by trade relations, 
by the flow of information, 
capital. technology. and 
goods, rather than by armies 
glaring at each other." 


Fuel tank blast ruled out in TWA crash 


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From Quentin Letts 

IN NEW YORK 

FOUR weeks after the crash of 
TWA flight 800. investigators 
believe they are near to con¬ 
firming sabotage as the cause 
of the disaster. 

Examination of the jumbo 
jet's central fuel tank, which 
caught fire in the incident, has 
suggested that it did not 
explode until 24 seconds after 
an initial blast on board the 
Paris-bound Boeing 747. 


which crashed on July 17 with 
the loss of all 230 passengers 
and crew. 

The new evidence backed a 
theory, likely to be confirmed 
shortly by officials, that some 
sort of bomb exploded in the 
cabin of the airliner, causing it 
to break up. The explosion in 
the oentral fuel tank, situated 
in the belly of the jumbo, 
probably happened when the 
aircraft was already in a steep 
dive towards the 120ft-deep 
waters of Moriches Bay. 


Investigators said that the 
condition of the fael tank, 
although burnt by an explo¬ 
sion. proved that this was the 
result of “a low-energy fuel 
explosion" rather than the 
more violent sort of blast 
associated with explosives. 
The latter would have twisted 
the metal more dramatically. 

It is thought that the first 
explosion, from a device that 
was possibly hidden in a 
serving galley or in a cany-on 
suitcase placed in an overhead 


compartment, happened near 
the front of the right wing. The 
location is unimportant, how¬ 
ever. The bomb would have 
crippled the aircraft wherever 
it was placed. 

Once the disaster has been 
officially recognised as an act 
of sabotage, the Federal Bu¬ 
reau of Investigation, which 
has already been involved in 
the hunt for clues, will take 
over the case and mount a full 
investigation into the fate of 
Flight S00. 


Nervous party 
managers keep 

Newt in his box 


W hat do you do with 
your party's most 
popular man if he 
also happens to be the most 
unpopular politician in the 
country? That was the co¬ 
nundrum faring the Repub¬ 
lican convention’s omnipo¬ 
tent scriptwriters, and their 
answer was simply to edit 
out Newt Gingrich. 

The Speaker is nominally 
the convention chairman, 
but before last night he had 
made only one brief stage 
appearance that was timed 
to ensure minimum tele¬ 
vision coverage. The tiger 
assumed the role of pussy¬ 
cat. In a seven-minute 
speech he spoke of charity 
and compassion, lauded 
Martin Luther King and 
levelled not a single unkind 
remark at President Clinton. 
There was no talk of revolu¬ 
tion or shutting down gov¬ 
ernment In fact he failed to 
mention the first Republi¬ 
can Congress in 40 years. At 
the end his wife joined him 
on stage for a cuddle. 

Mr Gingrich has also 
used his appearances out¬ 
side the convention centre to 
suggest he is really a softie. 
He has posed for pictures at 
San Diego's zoo, with the 
dolphins at Sea World, and 
building homes for the poor. 
His real work, of course, 
takes place oB-camera. He 
remains the party’s most 
formidable fund-raiser and 
by the end of the week will 
have attended 73 events in 28 


D emocrats are not let¬ 
ting their case go by 
default this week. 
About 18 party officials have 
set up a temporary head¬ 
quarters a few blocks from 
the convention centre from 
which they distribute instant 
rebuttals to the latest Repub¬ 
lican charges. They also 
hold daily press conferences, 
or “reality checks”. 

The officials indude Chris 
Dodd, the Democratic Party 
chairman. George Stephan- 
opoulos. one of the Presi¬ 
dent's top advisers, and 
James Carville. Mr Clin¬ 
ton’s 1992 campaign strate¬ 
gist. To the fury of Haley 
Barbour, the Republican 
Party chairman, the three of 
them are enjoying free ac¬ 
cess to the convention, cour¬ 
tesy of the television 
networks, which bring them 
in for interviews. 

Mr Clinton is also roam¬ 
ing freely around the con¬ 
vention. Well, not tiie 
President himself, but a 
remarkably convincing 
lookalike named Tim Watt¬ 
ers. His favourite (ride is to 
waylay die prettiest girls 
and loudly invite them up to 
his hospitality suite. 

T he whole point of this 
convention is to pro¬ 
pel Bob Dole to vic¬ 
tory this November, but 


SAN DIEGO ^ 
-- NOTEBOOK ^ 

some senior Republicans 
evidently believe that cause 
is hopeless. Instead, they are 
using the occasion to lobby 
for the party’s next presiden¬ 
tial nomination. Most are 
more subtle than Pat Bu¬ 
chanan, who has almost 
openly declared his in ten J 
tion to run again in MOO. 
Their preferred modus ope- 
randi is to cosset the delega¬ 
tions from Iowa and New 
Hampshire, the sites of the 
first caucus and primary. 

Steve Forbes, the multi¬ 
millionaire publisher, greet¬ 
ed the lowans even before 
Monday’s opening gavel. 
On Tuesday another of this 
year’s losers. Lamar Alexan¬ 
der. the former Tennessee 
Governor, held a party for 
the delegates from New 
Hampshire on board a char¬ 
tered yacht in San Diego 
Bay and urged Them to “stay 
in touch and keep your 
powder dry". 

Dan Quayle, the former 
Vice-President is said to be 
actively wooing the dele¬ 
gates. but the latest name in 
the frame is that of George 
Bush Jr, tbe son of thgi 
former President and higf& 
profile Texas Governor. 


M r Dole has sud¬ 
denly developed a 
family. Not only 
is his wife, Elizabeth, rush¬ 
ing around promoting him. 
so is his 41-yearoId daugh¬ 
ter by his first marriage who 
had previously stayed well 
out of the limelight 
Robin Dole, who lost her 
job as a lobbyist for a 
property company last year, 
is suddenly ubiquitous — 
appearing on dial shows, 
greeting tiie party faithful at 
receptions and last night 
introducing her father with 
a prime-time speech to the 
convention. The purpose, of 
course;, is to humanise the 
dour Mr Dole and boost his 
scant appeal to women 
voters. 

Mr Dole is fortunate to 
have such a loyal and sup¬ 
portive daughter. Richard 
Ben Cramer, his biographer 
tells a story to illustrate just 
how Utile attention Mr Dole 
paid her when she was 
growing up. Aged II. she 
wanted her ears pierced. 
Her father was so obsessed 
with building his political 
career that she hardly ever 
saw him. The only way she 
could ask his permission 
was to leave a “speed memo” 
on his bed with two boxes 
marked “yes” and “no”. He 
replied with a third box 
marked “maybe" and “I'll 
talk to you on Tuesday”. 
Thai was four days away — 
an eternity for a young girl 
in a hurry. 

Martin Fletcher 


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23 


THE 



TIMES 


inside 

SECTION 

2 

today 


ECONOMICS 

Anatole Kaletsky on 
why Germany must 
cut its interest rates 
PAGE 27 


Cook 


H arts 

Miranda Richardson 
better heard than 
seen in Edinburgh 
PAGES 31-33 

THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 



SPORT 

Is Laura Davies 
more than a 
match for Faldo? 

PAGES 38-44 


2 


TELEVISION 

AND 

RADIO 

PAGES 

4243 


Jobless total at five-year low 


By Alasdair Murray 

UNEMPLOYMENT fell to its fall. Unen 
lowest for five years laer 

suf-a 

lne number oF seasonally 54.400 to 
adjusted unemployment sameperioi 

^ *h^SlC» JU y “ 7b ^ “ nt des notifi « 

of the workforce. creased by! 

ine Government seized on and July to 
J e Jfe? res ’ which represent stock of vac 
me turn consecutive monthly by 1 ] 300 ti 
fall, as evidence of a strength- ONS cautii 
enmg job market Eric Forth, ing too rnuc 
Education and Employment increase ir 
Minister, pointed to a new saying that 
ONS estimate that the down¬ 
ward trend in unemployment 
has accelerated to about 15.000 I I Cl 
a month. V-'XCI 

The size of the fall surprised 
tbe City, prompting some By Janet £ 

fears that a tightening in the 
labour market could reignite A CLEAR pt 
inflation as wages begin to the Treasury 
rise. But Jonathan Lpynes, UK last month a 
economist at HSBC markets, yesterday’s r 
said: “The figures were stron- average earn 
ger than expected and provide The minu 

some tentative evidence the meeting on 
labour market is tightening showed that 
gently, but there is no need to cdlor, made 
fear a surge in wage answer the! 
...pressures." pre-emptive 

■ T * The number of king-term Mr Clarkf 
unemployed also continued to ate to the pa 


fall. Unemployment among 
those out of work for longer 
than a year fell 27.300 in the 
quarter io July to 779.000. 
while those without a job for 
more than six months fell 
54.400 to 1.197.400 over the 
same period. 

The number of new vacan¬ 
cies notified to jobcentres in¬ 
creased by 5300 between June 
and July to 223.400. while the 
stock of vacancies rose sharply 
by 11300 to 230300. But the 
ONS cautioned against plac¬ 
ing too much emphasis on the 
increase in available jobs, 
saying that the rise was exag- 


Strike days on increase 

THE number of working days lost through strikes jumped to a 
six-year high in June (AJasdair Murray writes). A total of 
228,000 were lost (7.000 in May) involving 133.000 workers 
(4.000 in May). The figures will rise in July, with the inclusion of 
the London Underground strikes. Disputes by Royal Mail. 
Benefits Agency and Derbyshire firemen continue, while action 
is due at several train operating companies. 


geraied by the introduction of 
a new computer system at job- 
centres. 

The TUC welcomed the fall 
in claimant unemployment 
but John Monks. TUC Gener¬ 
al Secretary, added that there 


was still no sign that the 
economy was generating new 
jobs. 

Labour pointed to separate 
figures published by the 
household-based Labour 
Force survey, which showed a 


30 per cent rise in youth 
unemployment during the 
past three years. Stephen 
Byers. Shadow' Employment 
Minister, said the number of 
16- and 17-year-olds out of 
work totalled 142,000 in the 
spring compared with 110,000 
in the spring of 1993. 

Unemployment fell across 
the regions, with the largest 
drops in the South East. 
Greater London, West Mid¬ 
lands and North West. There 
were also falls in male and 
female unemployment, with 
the number of jobless men 
declining 17.800 to 1,613,600. 
while women’s unemploy¬ 
ment fell 6300 to 512.600. 


Clash on interest rates set to continue 


By Janet Bush and Alasdair Murray 


A CLEAR policy divide opened up between 
the Treasury and the Bank of England early 
last month and is likely to be exacerbated by 
yesterday’s news of an upward revision in 
average earnings growth. 

The minutes of the monthly monetary 
meetinp on July 3 published yesterday 
showed that Kenneth Clarke, die Chan¬ 
cellor, made it dear that he is in no rush to 
answer the Bank of England’s call for a 
pre-emptive rise in interest rates. 

Mr Clarke said: “If growth did acceler¬ 
ate to the point where the inflatio n target 


was being put at risk, there would be 
sufficient time to act prudently.” 

This was in stark contrast to the view of 
Eddie George, the Bank Governor, that 
the quarter-point cut in rates in June 
“may have brought forward the time 
when interest rates will need to rise” and 
last week’s Inflation Report which called 
fora rise in rates sooner rather than later. 

Mr George's implacable opposition to 
further rate cuts and bias towards a rate 
rise is only likely to be strengthened by 
yesterday's news' that average earnings 
growth, which surprisingly dipped back to 
330 per cent in May, has now been revised 


up again to 3.75 per cent Earnings rose 
3.75 per cent in the year to June. 

The revision in the May figures, 
coupled with a continuing fall in unem¬ 
ployment. raised concern that wage 
inflation could accelerate later in the year, 
although most economists said yesterday 
that pay should remain under control. 

Today retail price figures for July are 
published and the City expects inflation to 
nudge upwards because price-cutting in 
the summer sales has not been as fierce as 
last year. Headline inflation could rise 
from 2.1 to 23 per cent and underlying 
inflation from 23 to 3 per cent. 



Ron Henderson, left, finance director, and Alan Jones believe that the benefits of the rationalisation at BICC Cables are already apparent 


By Sarah Cunningham 

A FRESH round of exception¬ 
al charges and a poor perfor¬ 
mance by its Balfour Beatty 
contracting business plunged 
BICC. the construction and 
cables group, into the red m 
the first half of this year. 

BICC reported a E2 million 
pre-tax loss in the six months 
Jo June 29 compared a 
£60 million profit in the same 
period last year. Before excep- 


BICC takes £65m charge 


tional items, the group made a 
profit of £63 miilxon. 

The E65 million provisions 
included £25 million for ration¬ 
alisation and asset write¬ 
downs at its German cables 
arm. KWO; E35 million for a 
write-down of the value of its 
Spitalfields site in London: and 
£5 million on property develop¬ 


ments. In 1995, the company 
took exceptional charges of 
£176 million for restructuring 
and the loss suffered on its sale 
of Clarke Homes. 

Balfour Beatty suffered in 
the first half from bad debts io 
North America and “disap¬ 
pointing contract settlements" 
in the civil engineering and 


power engineering business¬ 
es. The recently acquired rail 
business are already perform¬ 
ing well and helped to offset 
losses elsewhere. 

Alan Jones, chief executive, 
said the benefits of its 
rationalisation programme at 
BICC Cables were already 
apparent and that investment 


was being stepped up. Ana¬ 
lysis moved their foil-year 
forecasts down from about 
E142 million to £137 million, 
but shares nonetheless dosed 
5p higher at 320p. 

The loss per share of I03p at 
half time compared with earn¬ 
ings of 63p in the first half of 
1995. It is maintaining its 
interim dividend, which is 
payable on January 2, at 4p. 

Tempos, page 26 


Lloyd’s rescue irrational 
and perverse, says QC 

to-. i AnimiAimi 


Titan investors 
may chase £17m 


BY Jon Ashworth 

Richard Gordon, QC. said 
that compulsory premiums 
linked to Equitas, the new 
reinsurance company, 
amounted to “cross-subsidies 
that infringed the fundamen¬ 
tal principle that no mem^r 
could be held responsible for 
the debts of others. The tmpo- 
sition of a Central Fund toy 
on past present and future 
members to meet outstanding 
liabilities was also in bread! of 
die Lloyd's liability principle, 

as was the proposal to wnto- 
off £700 million owed by noti¬ 
fying members to the 

^Mr^ordcut said it would be 

wrong for the rourT !? 
dm Paying Names a dedara- 
• \hLt die rescue plan was 

« 30 invita- 


By Robert Miller 


don “to subvert the rule of 
law", he argued. 

Peter Scott, QC for Lloyd s, 
described Mr Gordon’s invita¬ 
tion to "ignore the question of 
chaos" as wrong in law and “a 
compelling reason" for the 
judge to approach his argu¬ 
ments "with the greatest dr- 
aimspection”. He added: "It is 
astonishing for someone who 
claims to represent more than 
1,000 members of Lloyd’s to 
make submissions of that kind 
against the background of the 
way in which finance for these 
proceedings has been collect¬ 
ed." He argued that, in any 
event, the Paying Names had 
no jurisdiction to bring their 
action by way of an applica¬ 
tion for judidal review* as the 
case did not raise maners of 
public law. 

The case continues today. 


THOUSANDS of angty in¬ 
vestors who joined Titan, the 
money-circulation scheme, 
may form a protest group to 
recoup losses now believed to 
top £17 million, after the 
scheme was dosed down in 
the High Court yesterday. 

Mr Registrar Rawson is¬ 
sued compulsory winding-up 
orders on the original Titan 
Business Club and associated 
enterprises and ordered that 
Michael Pugh, the Official 
Receiver, be appointed provi¬ 
sional liquidator. 

Titan signed up some 12.000 
investors who each paid a 
joining fee of between E2300 
and £3.000 and sought to 
recover iheir money by sign¬ 
ing up four or five other 
members. The Department of 
Trade and industry applied io 
die High Court in June io have 


Titan closed. The High Court 
and the Court of Appeal, 
which both labelled the 
scheme “inherently objection¬ 
able”. issued a series of injunc¬ 
tions banning Titan from 
holding recruitment meetings, 
taking money from investors 
and sending money out of the 
country. When a “done" of the 
original Titan was launched 
using American-registered 
companies, the DTI was 
granted an extension of the in¬ 
junctions. 

Peter Sealey, a corporate 
finance adviser to Titan, said: 
"We have arrangements in 
hand to protect the interests of 
people who joined Titan in the 
UK." Signs for Titan victims" 
to call a hotline are in place at 
junction II of the M4. near 
Reading in Berkshire and on 
the AJ near Doncaster. 


There was more evidence of 
the weakness of the manufac¬ 
turing sector. Figures for June 
showed a 51,600 year-on-year 
fall in employment in the 
manufacturing industries, al¬ 
though there was a small 
monthly rise from May. 

Unadjusted unemployment 
increased by 61,747 to 2,158.073 
between June and July, tradi¬ 
tionally a volatile month 
because of the arrival of 
university graduates in the 
wrokforce. The ONS said that 
it believed the adjusted figures 
may have slightly overstated 
the fall in July. 

Michael Saunders. UK 
economist at Salomon Broth¬ 
ers. added that there was some 
evidence that unemployment 
figures were being generally 
depressed by the rising num¬ 
bers of people at universities 
or on other benefits. 

Unemployment among men 
of 18 to 25 and over 50 stands 
well below its ten-year aver¬ 
age, but unemployment for 
men aged 25 to 49 has only just 
decreased to its ten-year aver¬ 
age. Unemployment for the 25- 
49 age group also remains 50 
per cent above its July 1990 
level, whereas the overall job¬ 
less total is only 30 per cent 
higher. 

Pennington, page 25 


Grid hopes to 
save £800m 
Pakistan deal 

NATIONAL GRID, the 
transmission company, is 
awaiting John Major’s sig¬ 
nature to save an £800 
million order for a ground¬ 
breaking project in Pakistan 
(Morag Preston writes). 

The order for the L400km 
transmission line that runs 
through the Indus Valley 
was fust discussed when 
Benazir Bhutto, the Prime 
Minister, met Mr Major in 
London in November 1994. 
but the Pakistan Water and 
Power Development Au¬ 
thority has since revised its 
options, according to the 
Department of Trade and 
Industry. 

National Grid was award¬ 
ed the concession for the 
500kv transmission line, 
nicknamed “Bom", in April 
1995. 


SBC sets 
aside 
£70m for 
bonuses 

BY Robert Miller 

SWISS Bank Corporation 
(SBC), which now owns War¬ 
burg. the London broker, has 
set aside a SFrl49 million (£70 
million) bonus pot to reward 
its top executives and senior 
traders. 

The performance-related 
bonuses were enhanced by 
sparkling performances from 
SBC Warburg and the Swiss 
bank’s private banking arm. 
This helped to lift the group's 
gross operating profits 33 per 
cent to SFY2.1 billion in the . 
first half. , 

The bank said the growth in 
personnel expenses "was due 
entirely to performance-related 
compensation" — another way 
of describing bonuses. Person¬ 
nel expenses rose sharply to 
SFr2.1 billion in die six months 
to June 30, compared with 
SFrl.6 billion previously. 

In spite of die Swiss bank’s 
higher depreciation and provi¬ 
sioning charges, up 37 per cent 
to SFr681 million and 16 per 
cent to SFr383 million respec¬ 
tively, the group reported pre¬ 
tax profits of SFr996 million 
compared with SFV724 million 
in the same period last year. 

Swiss Bank Corporation said 
that the integration of Warburg 
had been successfully complet¬ 
ed. The company added: “The 
financial goals set at the rime of 
acquisition have been exceeded 
to date. The new organisational 
structure announced in May 
1996 built around the four 
divisions — domestic, SBC 
private banking. SBC War¬ 
burg and SBC Brinson — is 
proceeding according to plan 
and will be folly operational by 
the end of 1996.” 

Net commission income at 
SBC rose 58 per cent to SFr2-I 
billion, while revenue from 
trading and risk management 
increased 27 per cent to SFrl3 
billion. 

Of the outlook for the foil 
year, SBC said: “The bank is > 
relatively cautious in its out¬ 
look for the remainder of the 
year in view of the uncertain¬ 
ties on the financial markets 
and the difficult economic 
environment. Provisioning 
needs are consequently expect¬ 
ed to remain high in the 
second half.” 


Business 

Today 


STOCK MARKET 

indices;.. 

FT-SE100...... 38303 {+63) 

Yield... A08% 

FT-SE A Afl share l 894.65 (+3.03) 

NSdcef.-__ 20981.11 (+116.16) 

New York: 

Dow Jones. 5658J8 (+11.10)' 

S&P Composite 661.57 (+1.37)* 


= IISRATE 


Federal Funds.... 5’.%* (5%) 

Long Bond. M's* (99 1 *® 

Yield —- 6.79%* (6.78%) 

LONDON MONEY - ’ • 

V’iejs?*'-. 

3-rmh Interbank. 5“*% (5 »k%) 

Litfe Long gflt 

future (Sep)- IOTIb (108'..) 


T-~ STEHHWS 
New York: 

S. 15488* (1.5483) 


London: 

S.__ 

DM_ 

FFr... 

SFr...... 

Yen... 

E Index_ 


1.5505 (1.5511) 
2-3000 (2.2904) 
7.8611 (7.8476) 
1.867S (1.8614) 
167.16 (168.93) 
84.8 (84.6) 


London: 

DM.. 1.4070* (1.4765) 

FFr... 64820* (5.0575) 

SFr. 1.2078* (1.1997) 

Yon. 107.90* (107.67) 

S Index- 96J (96. o) 

Tokyo close Yen 107.77 


-NOirrtfsRftCBb: 


Brent 15-day (Oct) $20.10 ($2025) 


London dose. S38&45 (S3S7.65) 

* denotes midday trading price 

Franc talk 

A concerted verbal defence of 
the French franc appears io 
be under way, with senior 
officials of the Bundesbank 
holding out hope of a cut in 
German interest rates and the 
French Prime Minister 
denying any policy tensions 
between the Government and 
Bank of France.The franc 
came under strong pressure 
last Friday on speculation 
that France was seeking a 
delay to the start of the single 
currency. Page 23 

Metal bashing 

Lower metals prices and 
difficult trading conditions at 
home and abroad hit first-half 
profits at Glynwed, the 
engineering group.The 
company reported pre-tax 
profits down 3.1 per cent to 
£402 million. 

Page 25 


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ifenodc. 


TIM15-8CON 


e value of ahara I 
I amount mvcBn 


f flicnpc.lraoi Ebon cm i 
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. & if you wdiJnw . ham tfsi mvuuuvrt in the i 
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um «+vjr*'hniHf*rs mnrrri narlies. In speak for 27.M per cent. 






























24 BUSINESS NEWS 


Campaign 
aims to 
calm fears 
over franc 

By Janet Bush, economics correspondent 


A CONCERTED verbal de¬ 
fence of the French franc 
appears to be under way, with 
soiior officials of the 
Bundesbank holding out hope 
of a cut in German interest 
rates and die French Prime 
Minister denying any policy 
tensions between the Govern¬ 
ment and Bank of France. 

The franc came under 
strong pressure last Friday on 
speculation that France was 
seeking a delay to the start of 
the single currency, that the 
Government wanted to push 
the central bank into sharper 
cuts in interest rates and that 
the Bundesbank was disin¬ 
clined to bail out the franc by 
shaving German rates. 

But this week has been 
characterised by soothing 
noises from Frankfurt and 
Paris. Earlier this week. Hans 
Tietmeyer, President of the 
Bundesbank, said he was 
confident that monelary union 
would begin on time. The 
August monthly report from 
the Bundesbank left the door 




RATES 


- V--i ■ 




Auara&aS_ 

Austria Sch ... 
Belgium Fr .... 

CanacbS_ 

CypnnCypC . 
Denmark Kr _ 
FmtandMkk- 

Fraree Fr_ 

Germany Dm . 

Greece Dr_ 

HongKongS 

Iceland 

Ireland Pt — 

Israel Shk_ 

Italy Ura- 

Japan Yen_ 


NsOwMsGid 
New Zeeland S 
Norway Kr — 

Portugal Esc _ 

S Africa Rd_ 

Spoon Pta_ 

Sweden Kr_ 

Switzerland Fr 
Turkey Lira 
USAS_ 


Bank 

Buys 

2-08 

17.15 

5031 

2235 

0.748 

9A5 

7.47 

025 

2-45 

382 

12j62 

113 

1.01 

S2B 

2457 

181.00 

0584 

2728 

241 

10.47 

247.00 

7.61 

20150 

1092 

200 

132770 

1547 


Bank 
Safe 
1 32 
1555 
46.01 
2075 
0.681 
656 
6.82 
750 
224 
357 
11.62 
S3 
033 
451 
2302 
16550 
0.538 
2498 
219 
957 
22650 
6.81 
18850 
10.12 
152 
124770 
1.517 


Rates (or smaff denomination bank 
notes only as suppled by Barclays Bank 
PLC. Different rales apply ha tr aw ler a' 
cheques. Rales as at dose of tracing 
yesterday. 


open to a further fall in money 
market rates if the trend of 
money supply allowed. 

Yesterday. Otmar lssing. 
the Bundesbank's chief econo¬ 
mist. told the International 
Herald Tribune that he was 
doubtful whether the German 
economy could continue to 
recover and made it dear that 
the bank was not happy with 
the rerent rise in the mark 
against the dollar and other 
currencies. 

In relying mi trends in 
money supply as a pointer to 
the right level of interest rates. 
Herr lssing, one of the most 
orthodox members of the 
Bundesbank's policy-making 
council, was also confident 
that growth in M3 money 
supply would slow further. 

His remarks convinced the 
markets that the Bundesbank 
is preparing the ground for a 
cur in its key money market 
repurchase rate. The council 
returns from its four-week 
summer break next Thursday. 

Alain Juppe, French Prime 
Minister, joined the effort to 
allay market nerves surround¬ 
ing the franc the mark and 
prospects for monetary union. 
He said yesterday that there 
were no policy differences 
between the Government and 
die Bank of France and that 
recent fluctuations in the franc 
were a storm in a teacup. 

Investors sold the franc last 
Friday because of speculation 
dial Jacques Chirac the 
French President, wanted the 
Bank of France to cut interest 
rates more baldly to offset 
weakness in the economy, and 
soaring unemployment 

M Jupp6 said yesterday that 
the Government shared the 
central bank's objective of a 
stable currency and that its 
determination to break the 
vicious cirde of the deficit was 
greater than ever. He said he 
was confident France would 
meet the Maastricht criteria 
for joining a single currency. 


Economic View, page 27 



Star signing: Dutch international Pierre van Hooijdonk cost Celtic El_2 million 


Celtic 
loses 
off the 
pitch 

By George Sivell 

CELTIC the Glasgow foot¬ 
ball dub listed on the Alterna¬ 
tive investment Market 
increased losses after tax to 
£1.01 million from £401.000 in 
die year June in spite of a rise 
in turnover and a return to 
operating profits. 

The dub wrote off E3.S 
million from its assets after a 
conservative review of die 
value of its team in the wake 
of the so-called Bosman rul¬ 
ing. which means that players 
are free to leave a football dub 
once their contracts have 
finished. 

Celtic has spent £12 million 
in the past two years on 
acquiring 10 new players. 

Sales rose 54 per rent to £16 
million, thanks to a return to 
Celtic Park, and profits from 
operations readied £2.7 mil¬ 
lion after a £180.000 loss in 
1995. Celtic Park can now seat 
47,600, and the dub has sold 
about 40,000 season tickets 
for the coming season. Last 
season Celtic had 29.500 sea¬ 
son ticket holders, up from the 
18^00 registered in the previ¬ 
ous year. 

Celtic says that all its pub¬ 
lishing. broadcasting, cater¬ 
ing, branded merchandise 
and Pools operations had 
shown increases in sales. 

The ordinary shares were 
unchanged yesterday at £275 
against the issue price of £64 
in September 1995. The club is 
worth £116 million on the 
stock market Net assets at the 
end of June were £31J million 
against E29 million in 1995. 

Holders of the preference 
shares, which cany the right 
to a fixed 6 per cent dividend, 
have seen an increase from 
£60 at issue to £225. 



Munich Re plans U S takeover 


From a Correspondent in frankfurt 


MUNICH Re, the world’s 
largest reinsurance group, 
yesterday revealed plans to 
take over American Re for 
$3 J billion, boosting its share 
of the lucrative US market 
The German company said 
its $65 per share offer had the 
backing of Kohlberg Kravis 
Roberts & Co (KKR), the- 
investment firm that owns 64 
per cent of American Re. The 


takeover should be complete 
by the end of the year. Regula¬ 
tory authorities and minority 
shareholders had yet to ap¬ 
prove the deal. 

Fresh from its shock take¬ 
over of Europe’s leading 
health insurer DKV last 
month. Munich Re said its 
latest acquisition would in¬ 
crease premium income from 
reinsurance to DM225 billion 


and overall income to DM37 
billion. 

Hans-Juergen Schinzler, the 
Munich Re management 
board chairman, said: “The 
purchase means a big step 
forward for our core reinsur¬ 
ance business. 

American Re is the third 
largest non-life reinsurance 
group in the United States 
with gross premiums of $26 


billion and a 10 per cent 
market share. This compares 
with expected 1996 premiums 
of DMSOO million at Munich 
Re’s own US unit Munich 
American Re. 

Pressure increased Jast 
month on the US firm to 
merge with a larger group 
after General Re Corp. its 
rival, assimilated fellow-rein¬ 
surer National Re Corp. 



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Telecoms 
cash-saver 
from Racal 

By Eric Reguly 

RACAL the electronics group, 
has introduced a service, in 
partnership with BMS Boss- 
ard. a management consultan¬ 
cy, aimed at saving money for 
customers of BT, Mercury and 
other phone companies. 

Racal has determined that 
phone companies have been 
overcharging business cus¬ 
tomers by as much as 5 per 
cent for data transmission 
services. The Racal-Bossard 
service is based on a software 
tool that identifies discrepan¬ 
cies. There is no fee; Racal and 
Bossard will take one third of 
any amount recovered. 

Ron B render. Bos sard's 
managing director, said: The 
collective overcharging could 
easily amount to millions of 
pounds a year. We know of 
organisations that are spend¬ 
ing as much as £20 million a 
year on international 'data 
transmission." He said the 
overcharging is typically the 
result of “human error”, such 
as failing to apply a discount 
or disconnect a circuit. Mr 
Brender said the service is 
unique and may be introduced 
into foreign markets. 

A BT spokesman said: “It is 
impossible to be absolutely 
precise on charges. We always 
reimburse our customers if 
they are overcharged." 


Ofgas shifts 
TransCo 
deadline 

By Christine Buckley 

BRITISH GAS will have to 
wait until next Wednesday to 
hear the pricing curbs to be 
imposed on TransCo, its pipe¬ 
line business, after the regula¬ 
tor delayed an announcement 
for the third time. 

The final word on the pric¬ 
ing proposals, first outlined by 
Clare Spottiswoode in May. 
was supposed to have been 
delivered today. But on Mon¬ 
day Ms Spottiswoode ordered 
re-writing of parts of the report 
— a process that is still going 
on. Tire delays have prompted 
speculation that Ofgas is 
moderating its initial propos¬ 
als. which angered the com¬ 
pany and shareholders. 

Ms Spottiswoode's initial 
proposals planned a one-off 
cut for TransCo's prices next 
year of between 2) and 28 per 
cent and thereafter RPI-5 per 
cent for four years. Her figures 
were on Tuesday broadly mir¬ 
rored by the electricity regula¬ 
tor's proposals for the 
National Grid. Price curbs for 
the transmission business are 
planned at a one-off charge 
next year of between 20 per 
cent and 26 per cent and RPI-4 
for three years thereafter. 

The Energy Intensive Users 
Group says Ofgas should de¬ 
liver a pricing review at least 
in line with that 


Granada moves to 
split media arm 

GRANADA, the JTV company saiditfSng a music 
animation business and^oSns were announced 
channel on the Internet. The n * Plantation of Granada 
yesterday as Granada umeiled Granada and 

Media Group, the TV division that hoias me 

LWT licences. „ _ . , activities into a 

The overhaul will s jj|L G, ^[J d Granada International 
programme-making arm. callea , airl j m e sales arm. 
Productions, and abroadasnn businesses, 

called Granada UK BttrtWj wi|1 develop 
Granada Media Productsand 5*. mar kets. Duncan 

new media and international broadcaMin, who 

Lewis. Mercury executive earlier this 

became Granada Medias chi ■ . nira ii v neutral"and 
year.said an animaoon products are c - concepts 

would sell well overseas. I ntemet music is one P 

also under discussion. 

Lonrbo ends Gencor bid 

the European Common blacked the propose 
Gcncor's Impala Platinum. Now Lonrtw 
of Gencor's appeal against the action. The EC competition 
authorities feared the creation of a duopoly in jjannum.• hjuh 
is used in catalytic convertors for vehicles, binrho is bel ev ed to 
have been loath to take on the Commission over a dral that is 
not central to its efforts to split into separate mining, hotel and 
trading companies. Tempos, page 26 

Cheaper housebuying 

BUYING a home is at its most affordablesince 1978. accenting 
to results of the TSB housing affordability index. A single 
person is spending an average of £25.40 of every £100 of take 
home pay on their mortgage, down from £30.90 in August 
1995. For a firsr-time buyer the amount is £21.10 (£21.90). The 
TSB's figures show that the cost burden of home ownership 
peaked in 1990 when a single person spent an average of £65-30 
of every £100 in take home pay an their home loan. The bank 
believes the figures will continue to improve for the rest of this 
year, but will begin to deteriorate around Christmas. 

Kvaemer changes 

KVAERNER has established a new structure for its UK- 
based oil and gas activities after the takeover of Trafalgar 
House in April. A new company, Kvaemer Oil & Gas. 
will combine its existing two businesses in the sector with 
two Trafalgar House subsidiaries. The company wfll be 
based in Aberdeen and will be headed by Syd Fudge, 
formerly managing director of Trafalgar House's UK- 
based oil and gas operations. It will also have offices in 
London and fabrication and operational facilities in 
Teesside, Lowestoft and Fife. 

Newsquest faces MMC 

THE Government yesterday referred Newsquest's £305 
million purchase of Westminster Press, the regional 
newspaper company sold by Pearson, to the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission. The MMC is expected to approve the 
purchase because there is very little overlap between the 
Newsquest and Westminster Press titles. As a matter of 
course, most newspaper purchases are referred to the MMC. 
Newsquest, which is controlled by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, 
the leveraged buyout specialist in New York, intends to keep 
expanding in the UK regional newspaper market 

Singer ‘not for sale’ 

SINGER & FRIEDLANDER. one of tire UK’s few remaining 
independent merchant banks, yesterday denied reports that it 
had put itself up for sale. Reports suggested that Germany’s 
Commerzbank was a potential bidder. Many of the City’s 
leading merchant banks have been taken over, usually by 
foreign financial institutions seeking a foothold in London. 
They include Kleimrarr Benson and Morgan Grenfell, bought 
by Germans banks, and SG Warburg, which is Swiss-owned. 
Singer & Fried!ander shares rose 3b p to 119b p. 

Thomas Cook pledge 

THOMAS COOK, the travel company, has pledged this 
Saturday to offer customers a better deal on French francs 
than any of its rivals. It will charge no commission on franc 
sales and is p romis ing to pay a better exchange rate than any 
of its competitors. Thomas Cook said anyone going to France 
this summer should buy their currency on Saturday. When 
the firm ran a similar peseta day promotion earlier this year, 
sales and orders for Spanish money jumped by more than 
500 per cent. 

Therapeutic loss grows 

THERAPEUTIC ANTIBODIES, the biotechnology company 
that uses a sheep’s bloodstream to produce antibodies for the 
treatment of drug overdoses and snake bites, yesterday 
reported a ner Joss of $7.1 million in the half-year to the end of 
June ($3.8 million loss). Turnover rose 33 per cent to $391,000. 
The bigger loss came after a 67 per cent rise in R&D. The 
company, floated last month on the London Stock Exchange, 
said its research programmes were progressing well and that 
its anti-venom products were growing strongly. 

War games advance 

GAMES WORKSHOP, the war games specialist whose 
main products are miniature lead soldiers and monsters for 
complex board games, yesterday reported pre-tax profits S 
£8.87 million. up47per cent, in the year to June 2 on sales that 
rcKe 40 per cent to £44 9 million. The final dMfcidSlS 
4.8p making the totaldnndend 6.8p t up 31 per cenTr^ 
record result came from strong overseas growth Sales in 
Europe rose 69 per cent and the company owned a no mfr is 
stores, most of them outside Britain. another 25 


Wagner says several takeover approaches have been received 

MAID seeks further alliances 



Wagner founder 


MAID, the online computer 
company, said yesterday it was 
confident of signing new strate¬ 
gic alliances to add to recent 
deals to supply services to 
CompuServe, IBM and Forte. 

Don Wagner, founder and 
chief executive, added that the 
company had received frequent 
takeover approaches but was 
happy to continue on an inde¬ 
pendent course at present. Mr 
Wagner would not say which 
companies had shown an inter¬ 
est in buying MAID, although 
recent market speculation has 
centred on Reuters Holdings. 

Mr Wagner’s comments 


By Alasdair Murray 

came as the company unveiled 
an interim £33 mil!ion loss, 
compared with profits of 
£408,000 last year. MAID said 
the loss reflected heavy invest¬ 
ment costs. The company does 
not expect a further increase in 
operating costs as the expan¬ 
sion programme is complete. 

An increased presence in the 
US and Europe helped turn¬ 
over to rise 65 per cent to £9.6 
million. The company added 
1,200 new corporate subscrib¬ 
ers in the first six months of 
this year — double the total 
number in the foil year for 
1995. 


MAID 
of its new 
five divisi 
pervise t 
strategy - c 
will be he 
and will 
North Ar 
Asia-Parif 
London v, 
Smith wh 
ing direett 
lean busii 
Jason Mi 
Morton w 
Asia-Pai 


Pennington, page 25 









! , . 



neor bid 


buying 



__ BUSINESS NEWS 25 

QUoyd^chemists still set for takeover □ Wage rises no threat to inflation □ Wagner confounds City doubters 


naiva M ^r e ^j c ar ^ 1 / erri ^ ,1 y 

somehow gained thefoj!?* ^ 

s^rj‘zi»s- 

enAusiasm for the bisinJss^ 
«*!«* this 

Sd ?h^ aceutlcals markets. 

sranth 1116111 ^V"° u ^ less than°S 
ago with relatively trivial 
cmdmons attached. One Sight 

haw Uc * ds s bares to 

haw jumped, to reflect the 

SwS? efButthepricehas 

owner in thfSSu^f 
^jsmess, nor Unichem, the rival 
bidder, will discuss their in¬ 
tention s. Instead, a sniping cam- 
W- conducted in whispers 
^ound the City and in parts of 
“ffmanaal Press, seems to have 
been designed to rubbish the 
opposition while gently talking 
down the price that Lloyds mav 
eventually be worth. y 

Both have until October 18 to 
comply with the conditions im¬ 
posed. requiring them to find 
acceptable buyers for much of 
.Uoyds’s wholesale business. If 
■meir respective stances can be 


Watering down the medicine 


judged ai all, then Gehe is doing 
more to talk down expectations 
{vf 1 u _ s nval- It is said that the 
ui j ^? e wholesale business 
will deprive any eventual pur¬ 
chaser of E3 million of annual 
profits, rising perhaps beyond £5 
million if potential cost savings 
are taken inro account 
, h said that a couple of 
gloomy trading statements from 
Uoyds, which have scaled back 
analysts’ profits forecasts by £10 
million to ESC million for the year 
just ended, make the business 
u S '?^ Ua ble. It is even hinted 
that the sale by the wife of the 
upyds chairman of shares worth 
U33 million while the offers 
were with the MMC means even 
the Lloyds camp is worried about 
The value of the business. 

Gehe; a German quoted com¬ 
pany with no real reason to lift its 
skirts and give its competitors 
inside information, chose to re¬ 
lease figures from AAH yes¬ 
terday. These provided the 
opportunity to make some 
comparisons that were not 
flattering to Unichem. 

This is significant, because 
Gehe was offering cash last time, 
while Unichem went for cash 


and shares. That pattern will be 
repeated when — and it is a 
when, not an if — the bidding 
starts again. Any fall in the 
Unichem's share price would 
therefore deflate the value of a 
renewed bid. The Germans ini¬ 
tially offered £5 a share, while a 
replay of Unichem’s package 
today would be worth approach¬ 
ing 530p. 

uoyds shares were 470p last 
night, which suggests that a new 
bidding war, in a few weeks' 
time, wffl have to be pitched well 
above this level. Investors would 
be very foolish to pay too much 
heed to any further posturing in 
the meantime. 

The good news is 
really good news 

□ THERE is no reason to feel 
bad just because a few more 
people are able to share in the 
economic expansion. Only City 
pessimists worry aver such 
things. Growth in average earn¬ 
ings, steady at 3^ per cent since 
February, has merely failed to 
fall back to 3.5 per cent, as the 
surprising (and false) pro¬ 



visional figures for May sug¬ 
gested it would. With inflation at 
15 to 3 per cent, it would be 
seriously bad for the economy at 
this stage if earnings were not 
making headway in real terms. 

Manufacturing earnings have 
been growing at between 4 and 
4h per cent for more than a year. 
Thankfully, real pay in service 
industries has now also stopped 
falling at last. But the labour 
market as a whole is still helping 
to cut inflation. 

Pessimists still worry about 
the higher than expected fall in 
unemployment in July, taking it 
down from 7.7 to 7.6 per cent If 
you accept the Bank of England 
line on sustainable growth, 
which underlies its interest rate 
advice to the Chancellor, then 


.any fall in dole queues below 
about 8 per cent risks stoking up 
pay demands and strikes, ana 
accelerating inflation. 

Over the year to end-March. 
however, there was hardly any 
net increase in employment in 

3 iite of the number of those 
aiming benefit failing most 
months. This subdued picture is 
unlikely to have changed in the 
second quarter. Among men, 
who took most of the jobs in 
industries sensitive to pay infla¬ 
tion. unemployment is still run¬ 
ning above 10 per cent. 

Strikes are on the increase, 
true. But the serious ones are in 
the public sector, where pay is 
dictated not by the labour mar¬ 
ket but by the Treasury’s need to 
keep public spending down arti¬ 
ficially at its employees’ expense. 
This would seem to be storing up 
trouble for the next Chancellor, if 
not before the election. 

In the private sector there is 
little sign of inflationary pres¬ 
sure. That may not comfort City 
types who assume that Eddie 
George will use a temporary rise 
in retail price inflation, expected 
today, and falling unemploy¬ 
ment to tip the balance in favour 


of a pre-emptive rise in interest 
rates. But logically, if they have 
faith in the Bank’s view they 
should also believe that a small 
rate rise now will avoid worse 
later on — and would therefore 
be good for asset values. 

When mistakes 
are MAID 

□ IN THE City, Dan Wagner 
was the dient from Hell. Small 
companies, especially high tech¬ 
nology stocks, always come to 
market with an unshakeable be¬ 
lief in their own worth. The next 
few months provide a series of 
road-calming measures that 
bring them back down to earth. 

Mr Wagner's online financial 
information business MAID arri¬ 
ved as the honest thing yet. The 
shares were floated in March 
1990 at HOp. Within a couple of 
months, they were worth less 
than half that, and Mr Wagner 
was spitting blood. His advisers 
bore the brunt of his anger for 
their failure to ensure the share 
price reflected his view of the 
value of his company. He also 
accused his bigger competitors of 


a conspiracy to break his com¬ 
pany. So far, so unwise. He 
acquired a reputation as a 
troublesome J9S0s-sty|e yuppie 
whose business was destined for 
an ignominious collapse. How 
curious that he is now tending off 
rumours of takeover bids from 
those same big online rivals. In 
spite of mounting losses, his 
company has come of age. Cus¬ 
tomers are growing at an 
exponential rate, the IJ200 added 
in the first half doubling the 
subscriber base. Costs have risen 
to cope with this, but the first 
profits are due next year. 

Three things can happen now. 
Those competitors can use their 
commercial clout to crush the 
upstart. They might or might not 
be successful — its product is 
better than much of the com¬ 
petition. They can tty to buy the 
company, but the board has 40 
per cent and will not come cheap. 
Or they can leave him to build 
file business further through 
strategic alliances. The shares 
were 271p last night; that price 
may be impossible to relate to 
any normal investment criterion, 
and their progress so far has 
been erratic. 

But we probably need more 
people like Dan Wagner, who 
has put together a business from 
scratch without recourse to a 
series of financially-driven take¬ 
overs. And one or two people in 
the City owe him an apology. 


Ji- 


CS 


s MMC 


►ale 


ediit 




11> 


ITU’ 1 


TONY WHITE 



Gareth Davies, left, and Bruce Ralph, chief executive, hope for b&ter economic conditions to revive Glynwed 

Glynwed knocked by 
fall in metals prices 


By Sarah Cunningham 


LOWER metals prices and 
difficult trading conditions at 
■"■■jrne and abroad hit first-half 
prijfits at Glynwed. the engi¬ 
neering group . based in 
Birmingham. 

The company reported pre¬ 
tax profits down 3.1 per cent to 
£40.2 million from £41.5 mil¬ 
lion a year ago. 

Glynwed*s shares slid I8p to 
332p as analysts revised down 
their forecasts for the full year 
from around E94 million to 
£86 million. 

The dividend for the six 
months ending June 29 is 
being maintained at 4.4p per 
ordinary share. It will be paid 
on December 4. 

On top of the sharp fail in 
metals prices, a cut in capital 


spending by British and Ger¬ 
man industrialists had a nega¬ 
tive impact on Glynwed's 
industrial piping business. 
This was exacerbated by a fall 
in demand from the UK gas 
industry. 

However. Glynwed’s results 
were bolstered by an £83 
million operating profit from 
the Victaulic water pipes busi¬ 
nesses it bought a year ago. 

The stepped-up programme 
of pipe repairs and replace¬ 
ment of mains supply systems 
by the UK water industry, 
which looks set to continue, 
helped demand in that side of 
the business. 

There was also some good 
news from the company’s 
consumer products side. 


which includes Aga-Raybum 
cookers, where demand 
picked up. The growth in pub 
catering also helped commer¬ 
cial cooker sates. 

Gareth Davies, chairman, 
said that the company was 
hoping for better economic 
conditions to revive its for¬ 
tunes. “In the UK, consumer 
spending is rising and hous¬ 
ing markets are becoming 
more active," he said. “Provid¬ 
ed that the anticipated im¬ 
provement in economic con¬ 
ditions materialises, we are 
confident of sound progress in 
the second half of the year." 

Analysts stressed that a 
recovery depended on metal 
prices recovering and on 
growth, so far uncertain, in 


industrial and consumer 
demand. 

The group’s turnover was 
£6773 million, up 113 per cent 
from £6093 million. Net earn¬ 
ings per share were down 16.9 
per cent at 10.99p compared 
with 1323p in the same period 
last year. 

The company has restruc¬ 
tured into three divisions: 
metals (processing and distri¬ 
bution); pipe systems: and 
consumer and construction 
products. Glynwed said the 
new structure should sharpen 
its focus. It is also continuing 
to look, for opportunities to 
dispose of non-core 
businesses. 


Tempos, page 26 


Tradepoint loses £5.6m 


TRADEPOINT. the firm that 

broke the London Stock Ex¬ 
change's monopoly on UK 
share trading last year, has so 
far failed to make a serious 
impact on the market. 

The AIM-listed group said 
that its daily share of the UK 
equities market had yet to top 
03 per cent It still hopes its 
order-driven trading system 
will reach its 

of a 2. per cent share by the 
Its 


By Fraser Nelson 

yesterday, covering the first 
six months of operation, 
showed a loss of £5.68 million. 
Michael Waller-Bridge, chief 
executive, said that 41 firms 
had now signed up. By 
automatically matching buy- 
cts and sellers* Tradepoint 
eliminates the need to pay 
market-makers commission. 

Tradepoint’s maiden sales 
were £77,700. Annual costs 
totalled £5.91 million, against 
£4.14 million last time. Its 

shares held to I30p yesterday, 

45p below the price of the 
April placing. 



Waller-Bridge: “below par" 


(A.I* a J - - - 

ce * Lloyds Chemists re-bid nearer 

km,, muld be identified for p« no; indicatorI of wh® 


By sarah Cunningham 


buyers could be identified for 
some of Linds'pharmaoun- 
cal wholesaling depots. Gene 
has until October )8 to find 


SKIRMISHING nas un iii -— 

foe Uoyds Chem^ t^J feuyers for seven depotsjvhde 

v battle yesterday, wth Gehe o Unichem must find buyers for 

“Wcertard Eick chief 
to will an™ “ financial officer of Cehe, “d 


give no indication of when. 
Gehe yesterday reported a 48 
per cent jump in operating 
profits to £243 million in the 
six months to June 30 at AAH, 
the UK pharmaceuticals 
wholesaler it bought last year. 
Herr Eick said that Gehe is 

_ ' „ _._.L . 


Capital set 
on Net gain 
in AIM deal 

By Fraser Nelson 

CAPITAL & Western Estates, 
a property company listed on 
AIM. yesterday announced 
EI4 million of deals that will 
see it acquire one of its quoted 
rivals and then turn itself into 
an Internet access provider. 

Through a complex series of 
share transactions. C&W is 
buying fellow property min¬ 
now Ballynatray. also on 
AIM, and the privately-owned 
Global Internet The deals 
value Ballynatray at more 
than £8 million, and Global 
Internet at about £6 million. 

Although C&W’s manage¬ 
ment has no track record in 
Internet technology manage¬ 
ment, the company said it has 
been looking for an acquisi¬ 
tion to escape from the mori¬ 
bund housing market. Giobal 
is owned and run by Jan 
Murray, who founded PC 
World, the computer chain 
sold to Dixons in 1993. 

Shares in Ballynatray rose 
bp. to 64p. yesterday, while 
CStW's shares were suspended 
at 24 p. After a consolidation, 
shares in the new enlarged 
group are to return at 20p. 


City Centre 
to expedite 
food outlets 

CITY CENTRE Restau¬ 
rants is accelerating its ex¬ 
pansion programme In the 
next six months, aiming to 
open 34 new restaurants and 
converting eight established 
outlets to new brands 
(Alasdair Murray writes). 

City Centre, best-known 
for its Deep Pan Pizza, 
Garfunkels and Nachos 
chains, yesterday unveiled a 
2 per cent increase in half- 
year profits, to £6.4 million. 
Turnover increased by 18 
per cent, to £61 million. 

The company said profits 
were held back by heavy 
investment in new outlets, 
totalling £870.000. It has a 
policy of writing off all invest¬ 
ment as it occurs. 

The dividend was main¬ 
tained at 0-45p, payable on 
October II. Shares slipped 
Up. to Il7p, as analysis 
downgraded forecasts. 


Generator waiting 
game for Treasuiy 

By Christine Buckley, industrial correspondent 


THE Treasury has no imme¬ 
diate plans to unload its 
British Energy shares in spite 
of its commitment to a pro¬ 
gramme launched last year to 
sell off its debt and equity in 
privatised industries. 

The Treasury has been left 
holding more than 12 per cent 
of the nuclear generator’s 
shares after the company’s 
flotation proved a disappoint¬ 
ment and the shares plunged 
to a discount on the first day of 
trading. Now the Treasury 
will have to wait for the 
market to pick up before 
selling on the shares. A large 
sale now is likely to depress an 
already fragile price, which 
yesterday stood at 1014 p. only 
fractionally up on the lOOp 
paid by private investors. 

Last year the Treasury 
launched a scheme to sell its 
stakes in the privatised indus¬ 
tries. It has since sold stakes 


held in some regional electric¬ 
ity companies and water com¬ 
panies. However, it still has a 
scattering of interests across 
the privatised utilities, includ¬ 
ing 34 million shares in Nat¬ 
ional Power and 22 million in 
POwerGen. 

BZW, co-ordinator of Brit¬ 
ish Energy’s flotation, yester¬ 
day confirmed that banks in 
the sale syndicate would have 
to buy back some of the shares 
sold to institutions if those 
investment bodies sold before 
November 22. 

The banks had agreed to 
underwrite sales to some insti¬ 
tutions in order to secure share 
allocations. The arrangement, 
which will be policed by the 
Department of Trade arm In¬ 
dustry. stabilises the price of 
British Energy, meaning that if 
institutions bale out of the 
shares, the banks will have to 
buy them back. 


Surprise 
for City 
from JRA 

J ROTHSCHILD Assur¬ 
ance Holdings (JRA), the 
life company founded in 
1991 by Sir Mark Weinberg 
and Lord Rothschild, yes¬ 
terday surprised the mar¬ 
ket with better than 
expected half-year results 
(Robert Miller writes). 

New life and pensions 
business in the six months 
to June 30 jumped 64 per 
cent to £39.7 million, help¬ 
ing the insurer to a post-tax 
half-time profit of £4.1 mil¬ 
lion against £1 million last 
time. Sir Mark said: “The 
results are a positive indi¬ 
cation that the bad position 
for the life industry appears 
to be in the past" 

The group's Life Assur¬ 
ance Holding Corporation 
(LAHC). which acquires 
ailing or underperforming 
life offices, reported a £7.8 
‘million pre-tax profit 



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26 MARKETS / ANALYSIS 



Cookson faces relegation 
in FT-SE 100 reshuffle 



Tina Turner & Co will get a new listing on Monday 


DEALERS took particular in¬ 
terest in Cookson. the indus¬ 
trial materials company, 
yesterday. It is at the centre of 
an FT-SE 100 reshuffle after 
the Thom EMI demerger. 

Cookson has until the dose 
of business today to vacate the 
bottom ranking position in the 
FT-SE 100, otherwise it will be 
relegated to the FT-SE mid- 
250. 

On Monday morning 
Thom EMI, whose music 
interests include records of 
Tina Turner and Queen, will 
be taken out of the top index 
and relisted separately as 
Thom and EMI. This in¬ 
crease in numbers would 
make the index the FT-SE 101 
and hence the share with the 
lowest market capitalisation, 
at the moment Cookson. has to 
drop oul 

But the game is not over yet 
for Cookson. U will be able to 
hold on to the prestige of being 
a FT-SE 100 company if it can 

push past Courtaulds or 
Southern Electric who occupy 
the two places ahead of it. The 
good news so far for Cookson 
is that both rivals traded down 
yesterday. Courtaulds fell 
from 44Ip to 437p. and South¬ 
ern Electric from W3p to 692p. 
The bad news is that Cookson 
failed to catch up. falling from 
257p to 250p, after a critical 
report from Nat West 
Whoever has to leave the top 
index will have another 
chance at the next scheduled 
reshuffle in September. But 
unlike today’s impromptu re¬ 
shuffle caused by a demerger, 
anyone Hying to get access to 
the FT-SE 100 then will have to 
prove long-term potential by 
ranking 90th or belter. 

Any such changes will natu¬ 
rally have a knock-on effect on 
the FT-SE mid-250, which will 
also have to lose one listing. 
Amongst the frontrunners to 
be relegated are In spec 
Berisford and Redrew. 

Yesterday also saw a sepa¬ 
rate reshuffle at the 350 mark. 
Bdhvay. the building com¬ 
pany. celebrated its inclusion 
in the mid-250 index with a 12p 
rise to 319p. Southern Water, 
who it replaced, fell from 
1032p to 1030p. 

Meanwhile, on the alterna¬ 
tive stock market, newcomer 
Barbican Healthcare record¬ 
ed a bp prem :, Jm at 6Sp. 

Analysts were yesterday hit 
by more economic data which, 
if anything, pointed to interest 
rate rises rather than rate cuts. 
Uk jobless figures for June fell 
24,100, compared with fore¬ 
casts of a foil of around 10.000. 


Average earnings grew 3.75 
per cent rather than the 3.5 per 
cent expected. While the ire 
pending election may stop 
aggressive rate rises, foe long¬ 
term upwards trend remains. 

But construction com¬ 
panies, whose orders are par¬ 
ticularly sensitive to interest 
rates, felt no dramatic fall-out. 
In fact, they were lifted by new 
hopes that German interest 


rates would be cut soon. 
Red land went up from 423p to 
430p. Brandon Hire was up 
Ip to 128p. after its interim 
results. 

Having only just recovered 
from the annual meeting in 
May. Shell, the oil giant, 
might be heading for more 
troubled waters. Thirty pro¬ 
posals by companies bidding 
for the contract to dispose of 
the Brent Spar oil platform 


were published yesterday. 
Shell scrapped plans to sink 
the Brent Spar a year ago 
amid international pressure 
and after environmental 
group Greenpeace occupied 
the platform. Brent Spar has 
been floating in a fiord in 
Norway ever since. 

One of the proposals sug¬ 
gests another burial of the 
Brent Spar on the sea bed. 


Greenpeace is now involved in 
a consulatation process with 
Shell, but if the environmental 
activists don't succeed another 
protest could get underway. 
Shell shares fell from (JZ&p to 
923p. 

Shares in MAID, the on¬ 
line business information pro¬ 
rider, rose 3p to 27ip after the 
second quarter to June results 
report Half-year turnover 
rose to £9.6 million from £5JS 


million with £45 million com¬ 
ing in the first quarter to 
March and £5.1 million in the 
second quarter to June. 

Analysts were amused by 
chief executive Dan Wagner’s 
comment He said: “We have 
built the infrastructure, now 
we’re going for account wins. 
We are now well on track for 
the lofty analysts' forecasts 
made, we are very confident of 
that" 

Wagner continued that 
more alliance partners are 
expected to be secured in the 
coming months. The company 
already has strategic alliances 
agreed with IBM, Forte Hotels 
and Thom. 

Pearson hardened 7p more 
to 675p, helped by a positive 
review from Credit Lyonnais 
La mg, who gave a break-up 
value of 872p. 

Nick Ward. Credit Lyonnais 
Laing’s media analyst said 
foe valuation could rise as 
high as 990p per share were 
the group to embark on a 
major disposal programme. 
He said if foe group sold its 
book publishing businesses, 
its French and Spanish news¬ 
paper arms, Mindscape, its 
software business and Lazard. 
its merchant bank, and then 
invested the proceeds in the 
development of Pearson Trie- 
vision. foe Financial Times. 
FT Information. and 
Tussauds. the 990p valuation 
could be achieved. 

Merchant banks attracted 
renewed speculative activity 
as Singer & Friedlandrr saw 
a 3bp rise to il^p, in spite of 
a denial of bid reports. The 
interest rubbed off on 
Schraders at 134Sp. up 20p. 
Singer & Friedlander said that 
“there is no basis of truth 
whatsoever” in press reports 
that the company has offered 
itself for sale. 

The FT-SE 100 index, off 
over 10 points at the outset, 
closed at 3830 3. up 6.9. 

□ GILT-EDGED: The larg- 
er-than-expeaed rise in unem¬ 
ployment and average earn¬ 
ings sent gilt futures down a 
half-point. The September gilt 
future dosed at £107 ,9 j 2 . 
down ,3 j 2 on Tuesday's dose. 
Short sterling futures also 
turned tail. The December 
contract dropped five basis 
points to 94.10, foe September 
contract lost four ticks to 94.17. 

□ NEW YORK: Shares regis¬ 
tered modest gains in a quiet 
session that saw technology 
issues slightly outperform. At 
midday foe Dow Jones indus¬ 
trial average was up 11.10 
points at 5,65838. 



n-1-1-1-1-i—1-1-1-1-1— 

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jiri Aug 


London & Edinburgh Publishing, which produces guides and 
brochures for sporting events, makes its AIM debut today. Anyone 
convinced that the Olympics wfl] be held in Britain eventually may 
want to contact foe nominated brokers Fisfce & Co. At an opening 
price of IDp the company wfl] be capitalised at £3 million. 


6 iHpICE^ ■ - ■ 


New York (midday): 

Dow Jones_S658J8 (*11.101 

SAP Composite-601.57 l« I.HI 

Tokyo: 

Nikkei Average-209S1.I1 (+116.161 


Hong Kong: 


Amsterdam: 


Sydney: 


Frankfurt 


Singapore 


Brussels: 


Paris 


Zurich: 


London: 







FT-SE Eurotrack 100 . 

_1639.02 1*1.80) 

FT Non Financials 

_J997.801*4.62} 





SEAQ Volume-- 

. 529.9m 


- 203.87 1-0.47) 

German Marie_ 

— 2J005 l*a0107) 

Bank of England official dose (4pm) 



RP1 - IS3XIJun (2.1<h>) Jan 1987=100 

RFTX_152A Jurt (2.8%J Jan 1987=1(0 



AND Intemarlonal 

67 


Ailzyme 

46 

- 4 

Artier Opps U Ln 

100 


Barbican Health 

68 


ChemicaJ Design 

(36 

- 9 

Denrm aster 

4 


Drings of Bafh 

4 


Egypt Trust 

677*. 


Electronic Retail 

213 


Fayrewood 

48 


Gall Thomson Env 

61 


HIT Entermm (163) 

202 

* 3 

Hambros smlrAsnc 65 


Hoare Covert J000 c 

97 


Lite Numbers 

12 

... 

Life Numbers wts 

5 


Lonerytdng wts 

I L . 


Pordum Foods wts 

I J 4 


Robert Walters 

129 


SCI Eniermnt 

165 

+ 2 

schrod Em entrs c 

370 


schrod Emg C Wts 

36 


Schrod Emg entra 

91’a 


Selector 

68 


somerfield (145) 

157 


West 175 Enter 

125 



I BIGHTS ISSUES V 


insplrams Pf nip (ioo) 7 
jvem wsri»tsn/p(4Q) 4 
Jerome & sons n/p (68) 2 
Lorien n/p (250) 12 

Scot Power n/p (250) 56 - 5 

Shaftesbuiy n/p (1251 M 


MAJORCA 


RISES: 

Prtco. 285p(+16p) 

BeUway.319p(+t2p) 

taioure.586p\+tBp) 

Serco Group. 575p(-*-15p) 

Carpetright. 55Sp(i-13p) 

FALLS: 

Real Time. 1 95p l-10p) 

Micro Focus. 700p (-30p) 

Renison. 290p (-10p) 

Osborne S Little. 803p (-T7p) 

Standard Chart . 691pl-14p) 

Cetftech . 520p (-10p) 

Closing Prices Page 30 


TIMES THU RSDAYAUGUST15OT4 



T EMPUS 


Cutting the cake 


FOR LONRHO. the notation of the 
Metropole hotels should be the easy part ol 
carving up the group. Hotels are the flavour 
of the month and a sale of foe business will 
enable Lonrho to repay borrowings ana 
improve the cashflow profile of the core 
mining business. That leaves Lonrho with a 
dilemma: should it sell shares in foe African 
trading business, providing a cash dowry for 
Lonrho’s mining engineers to spend on 
acquisitions: or should it hand over a share 
certificate in the trading company to each 
Lonrho shareholder? 

The laner could lead to a shareholder rout. 
Lonrho’s chief executive. Dieter Bock, is a fan 
of foe African empire and plans to raise his 
stake from 18 per cent to 25 per cent when he 
takes over the reins. But many investors are in 
Lonrho for the gold and the hotels. Invest- 


_ n H car dealerships, 
ments in agnailiu _____ risks are no , l0 

with accompanying ^ ^^certificate, many 
their taste. * the first opportunity- 

woulddumpfoe^- sha nTto new 
The aliernan i.-* hinds axe not 

SsSSS&l; 

mi* 

oanv with shares in Ashanti. Duikct ana 
other mining businesses. Hand mg a wad of 
ShtoTmanagement 


Glynwed 

AFTER two years in the fast 
lane Glynwed is back in foe 
slow lane, its brief career as 
an engineering growth story 
brought to an end by weak 
stainless steel prices. Its dis¬ 
tribution business. Glynwed 
Metal Sendees, suffered a 50 
per cent collapse in profits as 
falling metal prices reduced 
its profits. Stainless prices 
seem to be on foe rise again 
but foe setback was enough 
to spoil the profits advance at 
Victautic, foe plastic pipe 
maker. 

Glynwed suffered a pro¬ 
longed recession and inves¬ 
tors endured five years 
without a dividend increase. 
A surge in exports in 1994 
lifted foe metal basher out of 
the doldrums and the acqui¬ 
sition of Vidaulic was oppor¬ 
tune, allowing Glynwed to 
cash in as foe water industry 
— under a hail of consumer 


outrage — rushed to mend 
leaky pipes. 

Demand from the water 
companies is keeping order 
books full but Glynwed is 
still buffeted by every gust of 
wind from the wider econo¬ 
my. The answer ought to be a 
wider geographic spread of 
businesses but Glynwed has 
yet to find a pipes business in 
Europe or Asia to comple¬ 


ment Vlctaulic-Comforting 
sounds about a consumer 
recovery and increased sales 
of Aga cookers are not 
enough to justify buying the 
shares on a market rating. If 
Glynwed was truly confi¬ 
dent. it would have increased 
foe dividend. This is a con¬ 
servative metal basher that 
has seen its hopes clashed too 
often. 



BICC 

THERE was just enough 
good news buried in BICC's 
results to lake the edge off foe 
disappointment of its first- 
half loss. The exceptional 
charges, and particularly foe 
writedown of £35 million on 

the Spitalfields development 
look generous and offer hope 
that they will be sufficient for 
foe time being. 

Profit before exceptional* 
was actually up from £60 
million to £63 million and foe 
cable business is looking a lot 
leaner and healthier than it 
did a year ago. A further £25 
million of rationalisations 
and asset writedowns in 
KWO, the German cable ma¬ 
nufacturer, was unfortunate 
as foe company put funds 
aside earlier to pay for 1.000 
German redundancies. 

The biggest headache is 
construction with tough com¬ 
petition squeezing UK mar¬ 
gins to nil. BICC has begun 
tackling the problem with an 
overhaul of Balfour Beatty’s 
management, but the com¬ 


pany admits that UK and 
foreign orders in the pipeline 
will not be of help until IS 
months down foe road. 

Investors long to see BICC 
firing on both its cylinders — 
construction and cable. But 
the weak construction mar¬ 
ket means that day is still 
distant and the shares could 
continue their rollercoaster 
ride for some time. 

Tradepoint 

THE people most interested 
in yesterday’s figures from 
Tradepoint, the tyro invest¬ 
ment exchange, are not foe 
company’s investors bur its 
rival, foe London Stock Ex¬ 
change. Tradepoint tried to 
gloss over foe appalling level 
of business it is doing but foe 
figures look grim. On a rea¬ 
sonable day it is trading 
about £1-2 million of shares. 
In order to break even — 
Tradepoint has operating 
costs of £6 million per year — 
the exchange needs to be pro¬ 
cessing bargains worth £50- 
60 million. 


The establishment wor¬ 
thies in foe Stock Exchange 
Tower have no reason to look 
smug as they contemplate 
their own plans to set up a 
rival order-driven exchange. 
Lade of success by Trade- 
point bodes ill for foe success 
of their own investment and 
begs foe question as to why 
two systems are needed when# 
one looks too many.’ 
Tradepomt’s lack of business 
is not surprising. Securities 
houses need liquidity to trade 
but Tradepoint lacks liquid¬ 
ity and is ignored, thus com¬ 
pleting rhe circle. 

Breaking out of that cyde 
requires an acr of will by in¬ 
stitutional shareholders. 
They have every reason to see 
Tradepoint succ e e d as they 
will not be allowed to trade 
directly on the Stock Ex¬ 
change rival system. Ano¬ 
nymity is a useful tool for a 
fund manager. Unless they 
want all their dealings 
known to the market, they 
should support TradepoinL 

Edited by Carl Mortished 







j DOLLAR RATES - 




LONDON 

COMMODITY EXCHANGE 


COCOA 


Sep_ 

_1014-1012 

Dec_ 

— ■ 1080 SIR 

Dec_ 

Mar_ 

_1032-1031 

_1045-1044 

Mar _. 
May _ 

—. 1093 BID 
_I1OOBI0 

Mbv_ 

_IOSVID54 

iul —.. 

_HOP BID 

Jul'x-1064 BID 



Sep 

- 1075 BID 

Volume: 31 ID 


ROBUSTA COFFEE ($) 

Sep — 

— 1685-1684 

May __ 

_ 1547-1532 

n«_ 

_ 1045-1644 

Ju)_ 

— 1535-1520 

)«n_ 

;_ 1608-1607 

Sep _ 

_ 1535-1505 

Mar_ 

— J561-1559 

volume 9053 


WHITE SUGAR (FOB) 

Rnkn 

May _ 

.._ 138.03SJ 

Spue unq 

AUg — 

336J-35J) 

Oct- 

— 34WM8.2 

CM- 

— 325D-Z3J) 

OK-345.8-44-2 

Dec — 

325.7-234 

Mar_ 

_ 341.7-39.7 

volume 1433 


MEATS LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION 


Average /smock prices ai representative 


markets on August I) 



P>S 

Sheep 

fMlie 

RO: 

_11086 

6*53 

95.39 

1*7-1- 

_ *5.77 

-11.42 

-1.52 

Eng/Wales: .. 

_ 110.98 

1136.78 

94.78 

1*7-1- 

_*b-2b 

*1.98 

■an 

(%)- 

_-rxi 

,210 

*5SD 

Sowlarufc_ 

109J8 

104.34 

97.40 

(*H- 

__ «058 

*4.93 

-3j34 

i») 

_-210 

*140 

*380 


1C IS-LOR (London bJWptn) 
CRUDE OILS (S/barrel FOB) 

Brent RiysicaJ____ 20.95 (n/cj 

Brent IS day isep) - 2JA5 -005 

Brenl 15 day |oa)- 20.10 -015 

W Texas Intermediate (Sepl 22.15 -OIS 
WTtsas Intermediate lOaj 21.65 -0.15 

PRODUCTS (I/Ml) 
spa Cl F NW Evrape (prompt detiveryt 

Bid Oder 
Premium Unli XR(nro (nit) 

Gasoil EEC_ 187 1*2) IN (+2} 

3J5 Fuel OQ- 91 (.21 93 (.21 

Naphtha_ 192 (n/c) |96 (n/ci 


IPE FUTURES (GNI LHQ 
GASOIL 


Sep 

oa. 

not 

— I84J5-84J0 
-18325-83-50 

— 18200*225 

Dec . 
Jan.. 

18050*075 
17825-78.50 
Vot 12933 


BRENT (ft.00pm) 


Sep 

-202)2 BID 

Dec .. 
Jan _ 

. 1925-1928 
. 18.8S-I8.90 

Not 

1005 BTD 


GNI LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

WHEAT I BARLEY 
(dose lit) (dose Ut) 


Sep _ 
NOT _ 

-108.60 

. 11055 

Sep-10055 

Mot _ . im mt 

Jan .. 

-112.50 

Jan _ 

-10500 

Mar 

- 114.40 

Mar _ 

-iLi7.ro 

MOV 

-116.40 

May - 

-10920 


volume 31J 


volume 162 

POTATO (E/fi 

Open 

CJ05C 


not —__ unq 850 

Mac____ unq i\ao 

Apr -_ 86.0 833 

Volume 121 

RUBBER (No 1 RSS Cffp/k) 

Sep__ 8923-89.75 


BIFFEXfGNI UdfM/pQ 



High 

Low aow 

AUg 96 

1118 

1095 1120 

Sep 96 

1188 

1155 1188 

00 96 

IX» 

1200 1300 

Jan 97 

13(5 

1270 1315 

Vot 485 lob 


Open Interest 3950 


Index 1080-13 


(Official) (Vol um e prevdayt 

Copper Gde A It/ion net- 

Lead iS/tonnel ..—_ 

Zinc spec HI Gde tf/ronne? - 

Tin (Smog net __ 

Alum In him HI Gde Sf tonne] 
Nickel (Siturule)___ 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 


Cask 2010.0-0115.0 
839.00-MX0D 
1009.0-1009Ji 
msjxjtaxo 
H7&S-14WL0 
M65JH#flDX3 


3m He 19200-1921-0 
829.0083000 
KU7XHCB8XJ 
blbCUMIMD 
15113-151*3 
70750-70800 


Rudolf Wolff 

Vot 2175400 
327625 
356225 
10490 
787200 
8320b 



OH* Puts 

Serici 0* Jan Apr On Jan Apt 


Altd Dorn. 

. GO 32 

39V 

45 

6 

15 

20 

r«J) 

460 Iffi 

18V 

25 

23 

36V 

41 

ASDA_ 

. i io av 

11V 

13V 

2 

44 

6 

ri m 

13} 3V 

ev 

8*i 

1 

ff. 

11 

BOOU. 

- too 31 

42 

ST, 

8*, 

18 

22 

rsm 

650 TV 

17V 

29 

35-, 

44V 

48 

BrAirways. 500 29 

38V 

404 

9 

17 

21V 

rsisy 

S50 7 

16 

2SV 

374 

43 

48 

BP 

. 600 29V 40 

49 

ffr 

Iff, 

24>, 

re»i4 i d 

650 Vi 

17V 

254 

38 

45V 

51 

Br Sled_180 V, 

13V 

164 

SV 

10 

12 

n«2V) 

300 2V 

S’, 

8*i 

18V 

27, 

24V 

caw 

. 390 36V 

46 

54 

4 

10 

15 

P4WJ 

CD Iff, 

28 

37 

134 

Zt 

Zt 

CD _ 

. too ar> 

43 

51 

14 

22 

364 

rMl'd 

650 7 

19 

28 

4SV 

504 

65", 

ici 

. 750 43V 

61 

72 

II 

Iff, 

31V 

1*79 IV) 

800 16 

33V 

45 

34V 

42V 

56 

Lind Scc_ 

65D 37V 

45 

564 

4 

12V 

IS 

Pb7» 

700 84 

16V 

r> 

25V 

36 

384 

MBS_ 

. 460 15V 

42V 

514 

4 

9 

12 

MBS) 

500 10 

l». 

28 

Iff, 

36 

20 

Nat wen-. 

. 650 42 

61 

70 

10 

18", 

31 

rwvj 

700 15V 

34 

44 

33 

42 

58*, 

Safeway pk 130 25V 

33 

39 

5 

11 

144 

1*34111 

3» 9 

17 

24 

18V 

26 

294 

Salnsbuiy- 

. 390 2ZV 

29V 

MV 

S 

12 

144 

MW'ii 

420 ff. 

16 

23V 

19V 

274 

29V 

Shell_ 

900 35 

48-, 

61) 

I4'i 

224 

33 

P923H] 

9W 4 

23V 

344 

44 

*». 

594 

SmUBdl- 

687 42 

— 

— 

Iff, 

— 

— 

NiN 

736 16 

— 

— 

35 

— 

— 

StorclUC— 

280 24 

— 

— 

24 

— 

— 

r298'd 

300 I0V 

— 

— 

ff, 

— 

— 

TralMgar— 

_ SO 1 

— 

— 

OV 

— 

— 

nw 

60 0 

— 

— 

ID 

— 

— 

2mm _ 

1450 59V 

95V 1 

117 

42-, 

62 

714 

riawvj 

■ SOD 3b 

70 

914 

TO 

58 

974 

Scries AM Not Jaa Aus Not Jan 

BATInd 

460 10 

28 

37 

5V 

17 

2D 

Ttoi'i 

500 0 

114 

iff. 

JS 1 , 

■M4 

43", 

Vodafone- 

240 4 

15V 

IB 1 : 

A 

12V 

IS 

IWil 

260 OV 

7V 

10V 

a 

24V 

27 

Scries Aug 1 

Vov 

Feb ADC N<» 

Feb 

Omd Met- 420 36 

46V 

S3 

0 

4V 

IIV 

r455V) 

460 4V 

XT, 

28 

8 

IBV 

28V 

Ladbrokc— 

ISO 17 

21 

2T, 

0 

4 1 : 

7*. 

riWil 

200 ZV 

10 

144 

S', 

IT, 

Iff, 

Md8tx._ 

200 8 

15V 

204 

1 

7V 

10 

1-2074) 

220 0 

6 

■ IV 

i;v 

18V 

21V 


AllglUt 14. 199b Tot 48534 Gdb 22177 
PBt *257 FT-SECaft 59M ft* 13711 
lioderiytag wearily price. 


Cab Puri 
Series Oct Jan Apr Ort Jaa Apr 


BAA_ 

. 460 

33 

40V 49V 

4V 

IIV 

IS 

f4M4} 

500 

Iff, 

M 

ns 

ZZ 

30 

Jff, 

Ttama W. 

. 550 27V 

774 

48V 

9 

21 

26-, 

C563VJ 

600 

7 

14 

2) 

3T, 

904 

55 

Senes Aug Not Feb Aug Not Feb 

BTR- 

. 260 

4S 

12V 

18 

IV 

IIV 

13V 

(*ajvi 

280 

0 

5 

10 

I6 1 ; 

25 

26 

Br Aero— 

950 

(3 

45 

66V 

7 

33 

424 

79551 

10CD 

OV 

24 

43V 

45 

62 

704 

Br Teton— 

360 

15 

25V 

JIV 

| 

SV 

14 

rm'd 

390 

0 

ff. 

lb 

lb 

23 

ZV, 

Odbury_ 

900 

20 

M'm 

484 

1 

13*, 

21 

T5I8VJ 

550 

0 

12 

26 

3I 1 , 

42V 

48*. 

Ouldnea- 

4(0 

20 

30 

41 

ff, 

10 

14V 

P475I 

500 

04 

10 

21 

21 

31 

34 

GEC_ 

360 

16 

27V 

J3 

0 

7 

11 

(4775) 

390 

I 

II 

17V 

15 

21V 

25V 

Kanion_ 

160 

9 

12V 

16 

ff. 

6 

9 

riMM 

180 

0 

4 

n 

IIV 

174 

204 

LASMO_ 

ISO 

114 

Iff, 21V 

0 

3 

5 

PI9I1 

200 

1 

7 

ii 

o 

12V 

14V 

Inrwt__ 

220 

14 

22V 

28', 

i 

7'i 

9 

rzCTd 

24D 

»*. 

11 

174 

8 

16 

18 

FHUnym— I9| 

3 

— 

— 

2 

— 

— 

rr n) 

210 

0 

— 

— 


- - 

— 

Prudential. 

390 

39V 

3b 


0 

7 

114 

P4I5I 

420 

S 

17 

27V 

54 

IB*, 

24 

Redland — 

420 

12 

27 

35 

2 

16 

21 

reffj 

460 

0 

10 

I7>r 

Jff, 

40 

44 

R-ftoyoe— 

220 

4 

UV 

16 

3 

Iff, 

134 

raw 

240 

0 

4 

8 

19V 

Z3V 

2S4 


JCD 

5V 

15V 

ZV. 

3 


Iff, 

(*312} 

330 

a 

5 

IIV 

28 

33 

35V 

Wllllaraj — 

330 

ra 

17 

— 

1 


— 

r3394l 

360 

0 

4V 



20 

” 

FT-SE INDEX (*3831V) 



J7OT 

3790 380) 

3850 

3900 3950 


Cab 

1314 

(14 

31V 

4 

1 

1 


152V 

mv 

76V 


27 

13 

oa 

171V 

132V 

I0DV 

71 

48 

Jff, 

not 

188V 

152 

ll«v 

QOV 

65V 

W: 

Dec 

211 

— 

1474 

— 

03V 


Pm 

, 

r 

4V 

77 

74 

124 

Sep 

1SV 

2b 

41 

nr, 

02 

130 

oa 

31V 

o 

61 

82 

1084 

142 

Not 

44V 

57V 

7S 

06 

122 

152V 

Dee 

60V 

— 

04V 

— 

141 

— 


CaBs PaH 

Series Sep Dm Apr Sep Dec Apr 


AbtryNaL— 550 42 

53V 

64V 

4V 

12*. 2b 

P59IVJ 

600 9 

2S4 

374 

26V 

35 Sff, 

Amnnd 

— 130 12 

(SV 

1 — 

3 

7 - 

(■138 

140 ff. 

14 

— 

7V 

12 - 

Barela;* 

— 850 53', 

78 

93 

5V 

174 31 

{■**'<> 

900 20 

47 

63 

224 

374 S3 

Blur Ore_ 360 24 

32 

rr, 

A 

10 12 

C37941 

390 6 

15 

21V 

IBS 

344 264 

Br Gas- 

.. 180 22 

24 

26V 

1 

3V ff, 

H9ff4 

200 av 

Iff, 

154 

7 

12 15V 

Dixons _ 

— 500 18V 

35 

45 

10 

Iff. 254 

rswvi 

550 2V 

14 

zx, 

45 

494 54 

ftme_ 

— 343 41 

— 

— 

0 

— — 

0363*4 

373 124 

— 

— 

14 

— - 

Tarmac. 

100 4V 

8 

Iff, 

ff. 

74 84 

non 

no i 

4 

ff. 

10 

14 15 

HI ilsfwn 

1— ISO 7 

12 

IS 

3V 

8 ff, 

riSffil 

SCO ff, 

4 

6V 

17 

ar, 2 iv 

lirorho-. 

— 160 124 

17 

Iff, 

14 

4 6 

<*1701 

ISO 24 

64 

ff. 

114 

Iff. 16 

Sean — 

- 90 4 

IIV 

— 

ff, 

2 - 

(■9747 

100 J 

6 

— 

4 

6V - 

Tfiom_ 

- 1700 92 

119 

— 

154 

36V — 

f17901 

1800 « 

62 

— 

62-, 

8ZV - 

Itimhm 

— 240 21 

27 

31 

| 

4 7 

«58V) 

260 7 

MV 

19 

7V 

114 IS 

LlOTds TSB. 330 27 1 , 

37 

43 

2 

7V 14 

rJS4'-l 

360 8 

19 

25*. 

124 

19 34 


Series Oct Jan Apr Oa Job Apr 

Glaxo w. 

_ 8S0 «ff> 

84 

ff»V 

Iff, 

23 36V 

r«9Jl 

900 30 

54V 

71 

28*, 

44 58 

HSBC- 

- 1100 63 

4IV108 

21 

37 Sffr 

C1I4* 

USD 354 65 

82-. 

42V 60V 83V 

Rauer __ 

_ 700 59V 

80 

91 

10 

204 29 

n44'o 

750 S 

Sff, 

62V 

27 

41 Sff, 


Series Oa Jon Apr Oa Joa Apr 

Royal fi sun 366 27 

36*, 

41 

ff. 

13 20 

r»ff<) 

394 12 

21V 

2b 

19 

26 344 


Series oa Feb MOT Oct Feb Mar 

fUngflSflr- BOO 56 

74V 82 

4V 

154 23 

r»w 

650 21 

44 

52 

21V 

35 44 


Series Oa Dec Mar Oa DccMar 

Unilever.. 

. 1250 18 

494 

714 

18 

Jff, 36 

(■I256M 

1300 Iff, 

2b 

46 

474 

574 62 


Series Sep Dee Ape Sep Dec Apr 

Nad Pwr.. 

- 400 IBV 

30 

42 

sv 

16 214 

rsia 

450 1 

10 

20 

38V 

454 494 

Scot PWT_„ 294 24V 

26 

3UV 

3 

ff, 144 

P3IH 

323 IV 

IIV 

17V 

19 

23V JSV 



Period 

Open 

High 

Low 

Sen 

Vol 

FT-SE 100 

Sep 96 _ 

382721 

3846-0 

3822.0 

3836X3 

10504 

Previous open Lniercsc 65043 

Dec 9ft ._ 

38620 

38660 

38S9XJ 

3857X3 

IbO 

FT-SE 250 

Sep 96 _ 




43WX3 

0 

Previous open Inieresc 3490 

Dec 96 - 





0 

Three Month Stating 
Previous open Inreresr 420961 

Sep 9b _ 

94.19 

94-21 

94.16 

94.17 

12955 

Dec 96 _ 

■M.I3 

94.(6 

94136 

94.10 

18231 


Mar 97 _ 

93.92 

93.95 

93-84 

93-87 

14599 

Three Mth Euro Yen 

Dec 96 _ 

99D6 

90.06 

99X16 

99X36 

440 


Mar 97 _ 




98-82 

(3 

Three Mth Euro DM 

Sep 9b 

96.09 

96.70 

9*68 

0*60 

18001 

Previous open Interest: 1038565 

Dec 96 ._ 

96.63 

96l66 

96A3 

96X55 

17282 

Long Gilt 

Sep 9b _ 

I07-3D 

108-00 

107-16 

107-19 

4J89S 

Previous open (merest 152778 

Dec 96 _ 

106-30 

106-30 

106-30 

106-27 

0 

Japanese Govmt Bond 

Sep 9b _ 

120.17 

11328 

120.15 

120.17 

3=32 


Dec 96 _ 

118-89 

119X0 

11889 

118.94 

2103 

German Gov Bd Bund 

Sep 96 _ 

97.70 

972C 

972# 

97.76 

90788 

Previous open Inieresc 255684 

Dec 96 _ 

06l84 

96.90 

96#0 

9b. 89 

2143 

Three month ECU 

Sep 9b .. 

95.51 

95.54 

95-51 

95.54 

755 

Previous open Inieresc 26739 

Dec 96 _ 

95 S3 

95.54 

95-50 

95 J4 

5» 

Euro Swiss Franc 

Sep 96 _ 

97B0 

97.70 

97 A3 

97-68 

3419 

Previous open 1 Worst 74786 

Dec 96 _ 

97,59 

9759 

9753 

97-58 

2283 

Italian Govmt Bond 

Sep 9b — 

I1S.90 

116-39 

11558 

116-34 

24500 

Previous open Interest: 67006 

Dec 96 _ 

11SJ0 

irst>s 

115.45 

IISL67 

197 



j.if, y 

m 


Base Rates Clearing Banks 59 Finance Hse & 

Discount Market Loans: O/nlgtn high; 5% Low 5 Week fixed: S 1 '* 

Treasury Bflk (Di&Buy 2 mth 5*.; 3 mih 5"u . Sell: 2 mth 5’.; 3 mih: 5"« . 



1 mth 

2 mih 

2mA 

6mA 

L2 mtb 

Prime Banfc B3b (Dis): 

5"w*'. 

5V5*.. 

svr. 

SVP- 


SBeriing Mcroey Roles: 


5*u-5V 



ffr* 

Interbank; 

PVP, 

5“u-5*. 

Sfc^-S 1 , 

5 , r5 , '» 

ffr* 

Overnight: open 5Y dose 5 . 





Loca] Authority Deps 

y* u 

n/a 

5*. 

5”» 

6 

Sterling CDs 

y-S'v 

5”^5"» 

S*a- 5"u 

5"iv5 , « 

6-5‘*» 

Dollar CDs 

5.33 

n/a 

5-40 

5.54 

5*2 

Bnfldmg Sodcsy CDs 

5**o-S"u 

5^«r5*’e 

5“«-5*. 

5°o-5^u 

ff.r* 



Currency 

7 day 

I mih 

3 mth 

6 mih 

CaB 

Dollar: 

5’«r4"- 

S’m-5*- 

S'rS*. 


5-4 

Dcsitsdiemaxfc 

yw-rm 

3V3V 

3V3'» 

3Sv--V„ 

3V2*« 

French Franc 

-V^JV 

3'V"« 

4V3V 

4'r4 

4-3 

Swim Franc 

2V1V 

IWV 

Jr?. 

IwT* 

I'rlV 

Vac 

'«-Va 


V. 

Vm 

n/a 



BoJBoo: Opes *387.50- J87 JO dose 5386^0-386.70 High: *387.90-388.40 
Lott: *385.05-385.55 AM: $387.15 PM: $386.70 
Krugerrand: $386X30-388X10 CU48 00-250X0) 

PlaJUNOB S399-2S (£257-851 Sflwer SSaM Ei245) PaBadmm: $127.40 &82JQ) 



Mkr Rata for August 
Amsterdam-- 

Brussels- 

Copenhagen_ 

Dublin—- 

Frankfurt-- 

Lisbon_ 

Madrid- 

Milan- 

Montreal- 

New York- 

Oslo. 


Paris-- 

Stockholm- 

Tokyo- 

Vienna- 

Zurich. 


Sower Exit! 


: 14 Range 

Close 

( mouth 

3 month 

2.5777-2.5834 

15794-23824 

Vspr 

IVIVpr 

47.320-47.430 

47-363-47.415 

12-8pr 

3l-2Spr 

8-8840-8.9010 

83922-8.9010 

IVIVpr 

4V3Vpr 

Q.963H3.9649 

0.963043.9646 

lpr- 2 ds 

2pr-3ds 

'rl'a 

i2968-2J012 

12988-2J012 

'r*H»r 

23S.74-238J2 

235.99-236^2 

VkiS 

194.99-195J5 

195.11-195-29 

27-JSds 

77-93dS 

2348.1-2356.1 

2351 5-2354.6 

58-7 Ids 

I6-I8ds 

11265-2.1318 

2.1297-11318 

03043.25pr 

0JfrG48pr 

13484-1.5510 

13500-15510 

0X35-0.03 pr 

ai2-0.09pr 

9.92509.9487 

9.4J78-9.9487 

J'rApr 

zvivpr 

7J47t>7Jb70 

7^574-7.8648 

ivivpr 

jvjvpr 

Wds 

10^77-10306 

IO.288-10L3O6 

186.74-16733 

167X36-167J36 

'r-Vpr 

ZWVds 

16.159-16.193 

16.176-16.143 

vvpr 

iv. pr 

13660-13699 

1.8662-1.8640 Wpr IVIVpr 

Premium • pr. Discount • as. 


Australia 


IJ825-IJS3J 


Austria- 10.44-IO.-15 

Belgium ICOBll-3057-3058 

Canada _ 1.3742-1.374' 


Denmark .— 

France_ 

Germany 


_ 5 7380-5.7410 

- 5.0680-SJ17OO 

- 1.4336-1.4*46 

Hong Kong- 7.7332-7.7337 

Ireland_f.6G8J-I.W»J 

ItntV_15l6.Gfc-15l7.riS 


Japan 
Malaysia — 
Ndbrriands 

Norway- 

Portugal 
Singapore — 

Spain_ 

Sweden 


Switzerland-- 


107.87-107.92 

2.4947-2.4452 

0.4125-6.4155 
15230-152-50 
1.4115-1.4125 
125.94-125.99 
6.636S416440 
IJ05MJ062 


OTHER STS?UNG 


Argentina peso* 


154*77-15523 


Australia dollar_ 1.9867-1.9905 

Bahrain dinar_CL5775-0.5895 

Brazil real*- 1.5672-15714 

China yuan —........n/a 

Cyprus pound -O.7P7-0.7I7 

Finland markka_&8406.95b 

Greece drachma . 363.7y-370.75 

Hong Kong dollar- 11.9865-11.4950 

India rupee. 5450-55.76 

Indonesia rupiah _.... 35900-3658.6 

Kuwait dinarKD_0.4585-0.4085 

Malaysia rlnggli .. 3.8668-3.8701 

New Zealand dollar_20584-2-2622 

Pakistan rupee- 54.45 Buy 

Saudi Arabia rival__ 5.5725-5.6000 

Singapore dollar -11881-2 l«JU 

s Africa rand (com)-- 7 jxm- 7. 10b 

U A E dlrtum-5^225-5.7465 

Barclay! Bank GTS - Lloyds Bank 


->T 


J^SEVOUIMES 


31 231 

AS DA Gp 2-2M 

Abbey nu i.Too 

Allied Dorn 1.000 

Argos 908 

AB Foods 1,100 

BAA 1.800 

BAT IndS 5.400 

HOC 2.900 

BP A 800 

BSfcyB 243 

BTR 5.500 

BT 7J00 

Bk of Scot 1500 

Barclays 4.000 
Bass 1000 

Blue Circle 747 
Boots B07 

BAe SOI 

BA 3.600 

Bril Gas 3,600 
Bril Sleet X60L3 
Bumiah Oil 49b 

Burton 2300 
Cable win; i.ioo 
C adbury 917 
Carlton Cms 974 
Cm Union 666 
cookson 4400 
Courtaulds 594 
Dixons 813 

Enterpr 011 1.400 
GKN 289 

GRE 1.400 

GUS 938 

Gen Acc 735 
Gen Elec 4.500 
Glaxo Well 23)0 
Granada 333 
Grand Mer 3.100 
Guinness 719 
H5BC 3,WO 
Hanson 1.600 
ICI 824 

Kingfisher 531 
LASMO 3300 
Lad broke 4.100 
Land Secs 1300 
Legal A Gn JOB 
UoydsTSB 5J500 


Marks 5pr 3.400 
NalWst Bk 4.800 
Nat Grid MAOO 
Nat Power 4.700 
Next 837 

Orange 2400 
pa o L 600 

Pearson 2J00 
Ptfldngran 281 
PcnwerGen 7|7 
Prudential 6,400 
RMC 278 

RTZ 1.700 

Rallrrack 2J£D 
Rank Chg 2300 
Recidtl Col 1300 
Redland 1.900 
Reed Inil 629 
Ren in Id I 2800 
Reuters 2800 
Rolls Rpyce 1.000 
Royal ® sun 2800 
Royal Bk SO 2500 
Sslcway I.40D 
Sains bury 2000 
Schroders 156 
Scot A New 741 
Scot Power 3*00 
svm Trent 291 
shell Trans 1.900 
Slebe 649 

SmKl Bch 2500 
Smith Nph ijtoo 
S miths Inds 198 
Si hem Elec l.soo 
Sid Chand 6300 
TlGp 778 

TBJC S Lyle 340 
Team 5-200 

Thames w 308 
Thm EMI 1.600 
Tomkins 1.100 
Unilever 1.500 
Uld utilities 870 
Hid News 1300 
Vodafone 2000 
Whitbread 1.903 
Wilms Hid 2500 
WDlseley 1300 
Zeneca 1.000 


Aus 14 Aux 13 
muxtn dene 


amp Inc 

3V. 

389 

Euon Corp 

sy. 

549 

AMR Corp 

82'. 

82-, 

Ed bon Ini 

iff. 

Iff. 

ASA 

XT. 

XV. 

Emerson Elec 

sv. 

a, 

4T 0 T 

54'. 

549 

Ejqrriftvd Corp 

209 

2ff. 

.Mjbon Ubj 

46 

4b 

Enron Carp 

4ff. 

Jff. 

AOTanceri Micro 

13V 

13'. 

Enter# 

2ff. 

259 

Anna Life 

65V 

ar. 

Einyl com 

99 

* 

Abmaruon fHFl 

25*. 

25', 

Exton 

80*. 

81'. 

Air Prod 4 Cnem 54V 

54V 

FMC Corp 

M> 

»9 

aIiTQdcA Comm 

27'. 

27 

Frt. Croup 

469 

459 

Alberro-culver B 

42*. 

429 

Federal Express 

75 

JS'. 

Albnrvnvi 

41 

409 

Fed Has Mlgc 

jy. 

72. 

Alcan AJumnoi 

Jff. 

XT. 

Flni Bk Sy? 

619 


Alco S ran Hard 

4r. 

47-, 

Hist Union mrv 

ff. 

O'. 

Allied Signal 

62S 

6Z. 

Fleer Flnl Grp 

4J9 


Alum Co of Am 

or. 

off. 

Fhior Corp 

off. 


Amar Gold Lnc 

S'. 

6 

Pud Mao, 

33 

13 

Amerada Heu 

49', 

XT, 

OTl Corp 

419 

41V 

Amur Brands 

439 

AX, 

Gannen 

60V 

Off, 

Antrr El Power 

429 

42 

G«p lnc Del 

3ff. 


Amer Etprew 

459 

44'. 

Gen Dynamic 



Amer Genl Corp 

W. 

Jff. 

Gen Electric 



Amer Home Pr 

58 

» 

Gen Mills 

M-. 


Amer 1 ml 

W. 

*r. 

Gen Moron 

51'. 


Amer 5[ora 

ff)-. 

iff. 

1 nen Remwjranre iw, 


Amer standard 

JJS 

329 

Gen Signal 

Jff; 


Ameritrth 


549 

Genuine Pans 



Amoco 

60*. 

Off. 

Georgia Pac 



Anheuser-Bujcn 

749 

749 

Gillie 



Apple Compum 

229 

229 

Glaxo Welle ADR 



Arctic DanlrU 

1*9 

ia 

Goodricn ran 



Anna) 

49 

49 

Goodyear Tire 



Armurras wrfcJ 

Sff. 

Sff. 

Croce (W 8 JU 



Ararco 


24V 




Ail BJchileVl 

Iff, 

Iff. 

Gnat WMn fid 



Aulo Data Pro 

419 

41'. 




Aiwy Dennlun, 

Si 9 

519 

Hartoun GrTtenl Ak\ 

48 


Avon Products 
Bafca Hotpia 
Bajnm Gas a fi 25' 

Banc One 
BankAmerlct 
Band of tnr 
Bankas Tr NY 
Oamai Barks 
Bausch 0 Lornb 37 1 . J7'. 

Baaier lull 
Bectn Chdcnsn 
Bed Alla ark 
Bell Industrie, 

BdlSouUi 
Block & Decker 

Block IHAIQ 
Borina 

BoUe Cascade 

Bristol Myn Sq 
Browning Frrrtj 
Bninswtck _ 
Burlington Num if, ta\ 
CMS Energy Core 37. XT. 
Cna Financial lor. lot 
CPC InU OS', 48'a 

CSX r*. 4Q-. 

Campbell Soup W. f/r. 


2S: 

3 r. ST. 
W. U4 
27'. zr. 
77', 7T. 

Of. 


43'. 4J. 

83S UT. 

M. 
W- W. 
39 » P 
38 38'. 

zr. u 
<v. 

34*. M 

sr. or, 

S', is 
JO-. XT. 


Can Piartc 
Carolina p»r 
Caierplllar 

Central 4 sw 


27. ir, 
W. 36'. 
71 T. TV. 
V. Xf. 


Champion Irol 44'. 43 s 


Chaj* Manhol 
Chevron Carp 
Chiyiin 
Chubb Carp 
Cigna CDTp 
Citicorp 
doitn 

Cmsial Corp 
Coca Cola 


74'# 7C. 

S7'j W. 
s. s. 
45', 4S-. 
nr, ii4'. 
*S'. 8 S>. 

91', 0| 
40>. 4iy. 

w. ar. 


ootaie-raimnitte «■. si'. 

Columbia Gas 57', STi 

ColumbtaHCA S4. 54'. 

Compaq Comp 58". y. . 

Comp Aas Int 5b'. sy, 

Conagn 
ComaO 
cons Edison 
COna Nal Gas 
Cooper Inda 


4T. 4T. 
W M 

IT. 27'. 
S3'. Sk. 


coming Inc 
crown cart 
Dana Corp 


St 28'. 


Payton Hudson 33V 33. 

Deere 

Delia air lines 
Dehue dtp 
Digital Equip 
DU la id Dept Si 
Disney IWalq 
Dominion 8a 
Donritcy (RR) 

Dover Corp 
Dow Chemical 
Dow Hus 
Dima 
Duke Power 
Dun 0 Bnbirm 5*v « 
DU Pom KT, HZ. 

Eastfflaii Chcm 52s SJ>, 
Eastman Kodak 75'. 7j', 


M*. 37', 
34 33'. 

5S » 
31r. 3»'. 
33'. JJ', 
44V 44V 
77V rT”. 
4tF. 40 
28*1 2 a-. 

4T, 48V 


Aus M Aug 13 
midday ease 


Heim (HD 
Berniks sr. 

Hcnhrv Foods 84V 

Hewten Packard 43'. 

HUtoo Holds lor. 

Home Deruc 


Knmcrake Mng W. 
Honeywell 
HoosriioM Inil 
Hounon Inds 
Homans 
ITT Corp 
Illinois Tool 
IDlnovB 
INCD 


ingcnou Rand 
Inland sii 


5bS 

77'. 

ZZ 

19'. 

SbV 

68', 

a>v 

31'. 

45V 


Inland steel 
lore! Corp 
IBM 

InU Flav A Fr 
InU Paper 
fames Rher va xr. 

Jhrnn 6 Jhnsn iy. 

JCeitoeg 74'. 

Krrr-McC.ee jy. 

Kimberly-CVuV "TO 

Rmarl ny, 

KnWir-RWder ir, 

uuy (Eii> S8v 

Umlrnf Inc io> 

Lincoln Nu 44 >, 

Unon 441 , 

112 Oalborne j., 

fntkhred Martin ny. 

Louisiana Par gl', 

MCI Comm *■-• 

Minion Ini 


31 
52 
84V 
43V 
I Ob'. 
54V 
MT< 
55'. 
7b': 

IV 

56V 

OB’. 

26 

31 

45': 

17V 


IJ'i 
'•I - - 
I Iff. I Ob. 
44V 44V 


40. 

25v 

S2V 

74'. 


33". 

58V 

I4-. 


Marsh a McUm 
Masco Corp 
May Depr 51 
Mayui: Cerp ay. 

McDonalds 
McDnnnril O ta, 

McCraw Hill 4 , 

Mad Cnm u,. 

Medtronic 

Mellon Bk «. 

MeWlk crop 
Menk Inc ^ 

Mernll lyncn n 2 >. 

Micro,on ‘ 

Sr,' 

Mobil Cwp n, 

Mons^nio T«i 

Morgan t jp] 

jnc tr, 

»'au Semi it. 

Nall Ser»|re Irul 
JJavUlar Ini 
Tima a 


21 
37V 
56V 
9IV 

w, 

44V 

a>. 

47-. 

». 

42 

S7', 

S4** 

55V 

43V 


Nrwmonr Mnr 

nS ?*** 

Nl Industries 
J u, ™m Ertnyv 
Vfl 'dMrmn 

Nonoly s*m aj-. 
Mhn Slur PWr 
Nw.«i Corp 
"yna Corp 
OaMmul Ret 

fchlu Edlsrl) 

fracip 


8 

105V 

ll>. 

14V 

37V 


:*p. 

45*. 

23V 

ny. 

4ff 


31V 

>W. 

SJV 

IS'. 

38V 

<r, 

XT. 

53 

8 ". 

IOt»V 

Iff. 

14V 

37V 

MV 

4SV 

3h. 

45V 

23*. 

21 

XT. 


Aue 14 Aus 13 
midday dose 


Oryx Energy Co In', ir 
Ovrneai Snip |$v is 
Owens Cumins: 3SV 38 
PHH Cdrp 27V 27 

PTC Indus!its 51V 51 

PNC Bank 29", 29 

PPOl ft« 22V 22 

Paccar Inc 4 b-, 45 

PulRairp 21 V 21 

Pae Enterprises; 30V 30 
Pac Gas A Elea 20 v 20 

Far-Trials J4V 34 

Pall Corp 23V 24 

PaiVrr Hannifin 36*. 30 

fov Energy 24-. 24 

Penney UCJ 52". 52 

Pcniuoll 42V 51 

Pepsloo 31V 31 

P 0 »r 73 73 

Pharm a Upjhn 42V 42 
Phelps codec oiy. ter 

Fhltlp Morris 91V ■» 

Phillips M 3V, yr 

Pliney Boons ‘fr. tn 

Polaroid 4 V, 

PrtceCostco 31V 2 |> 

fnxur A Gmbl tv. t» 

PrwldtJn XT, JO" 

PUP Vnv E a c 27'. ZT 
thaler Oats 32V 32 

Ralston Purina 65'. w 
k-ffehern Corp \A>. 70 

Royiheon Jc, jp- 

'nU 35V 35' 

Reynolds Metals 52 51 

Rotted] Ini 54V 54', 

tehm 8 Haas 61 v ol' 
Royal Dutch 146V 14V. 

PubbermaJd 2 g'. x 

SBC Cbm ms -tt. 40 L 

58Iren Corp J3V jj' 

St Pauly cbs 5|v 5 |’ 

salr>mcfl Inc 44‘, 44', 

Sara Lee Corp jiv jjv 

srherijiR pitmgfi sr. stv 

SdJIumbetRer mv bj-. 

5ea irrom 33 v jy, 

sears Rodwa 55 *?■ 

Sbeil Tram aSv ». 

Sherwin Wilms 44 *tj 

Skyline corp 25 % 2 sv 

snop-On-Tinls «y, as 1 , 

Souurrm Co 23 22 V 

Sprtni Corp jn-, jo 

Stanley Works 20 ', 29. 

Sun Company 25V 25v 

Sun Micro 17 s 55 V S5 

Sunirusi 38 38V 

Supervalu jp, 

Sysco Corp 31 JO*. 

TRW Inc 03 V 93'. 

I p? . ln ' 1 s_ ZV P. 

Tandem Comp jr, ns 

Tandy Corp 451 , 45 

w * ^ 

Temple inland 5 p. go", 

Tdinecu 5 , a,., 

Texaco ar. 16 

Texas Jim w ^ 

TWs Urllhln 4Z. 42V 

Textron 344 

rime WaiPa 35v s. 

Tlma-MJrror A 44V 44V 

nmkn yp, 37 *, 

Torchmark 4 _v. ov 

Toys ft Ui JP, 27V 

Tronsamalca 7nv XT. 

Twoim 45 45 

Tribune 73 77V 

ft? i" 42'. 43 

lSl nc " • «'■ 

ITS Inds 2 b It 

Chmni XT. 31V 

U5X Maruiion 2D*. Xh 

umoom its 23 s 

K25>S" v mi v 14 iv 

Unloa Camp 5 ^, w. 

Unkoi\ Caique A y § ^ 

Union Panne 7iv 71 v 

Com 6 

I.IS4IR Group I0 a fl i§ 9 . 

srat 0 -* 5k 5: 

United Tcdi nov lie. 

unorat Corp m xv. 

“ corp w. sss 

Teen 32V 31V 

WhMtartSiwes s, 2 tv 

wjnrr Lainben 57 1 . 57V 

Writa Fojro 248', 247 
WBringhouie El 15V ty. 

“Jeyernacuser 4S". 44V 

Whlflpool 49*■ XT. 

"human 22 *. 22 *, 

w lnn Duuc jsv 35'. 

w w>h»orh sr, ah 

Wrtgley |Wm) lr 53 SJV 

ntTBX S 3 ', JJ, 

Velio" Cnrp 14 14V 



. 1 



V. 


■ \ 

> \ 

* 



M;,-’ 


9 ■" 


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^ 15 | 




| S S!£l^lggTHURSDAYAUGl tct« 


1996 


ANALYSIS 27 


THE 

times 


CITY 

diary 


2k 



XSV : 


Mogford: has acquired 
West End’s longest bar 

Courts bought 

AS the coowner of Rules 
in Covent Garden until 
19SS. Jeremy Mogfoid had 
many an argy-bargy with 
the “beaks" in that area 
over extended licensing 
hours for the restaurant 
To avoid similar difficul¬ 
ties with the opening of his 
new 340-seatCT Browns 
restaurant in die same 
area, Mogfoid, the distin¬ 
guished topiarist and own¬ 
er of Browns Restaurants, 
has discovered the ulti¬ 
mate solution. Backed by 
the Royal Bank of Scot¬ 
land, he has bought the 
Westminster Courts, 
which boasts the longest 
bar in the West End-asa 
home for what will be the 
eighth and biggest 
Browns. So will it be next 

year that he converts to pic 

status? 

In a flap 

SOUNDS like »»*** 
Widows Investment Man¬ 
agement has found an 
investment that wfll Y* 
Poised to make 

investment in 
Swim’s wings are uj* “*P 
over a farm that produces 

genetically en * , " < j!!! st 

ductais 

twice the normal 
X! weigh in at around 

Accord'"* 

Park, head of 
Swim’s interoa^^ 


MORAO PRESTON 



ECONOMIC VffiW 



ANATOtEKALETSKY 




In the frame 
for a ticket 

INDEPENDENT Insur- 
ance really ought to con- 
stder taking out one of its 
own special events insur¬ 
ance policies for the firm’s 
next photo-shoot 

Posing next to a fleet of 
sniny new Metrocabs. 
sponsored by Independent 
Insurance. Michael 
tsngnt the chief executive. 
■*nd Garth Ramsay, the 
c hairman. looked just the 
picture for yesterday's in¬ 
terim results. 

Then two zealous traffic 
wardens walked onto the 
sc ^ ne ' and no amount of 
cajolery could dissuade ei¬ 
ther of them from plasler- 
mg parking tickets on two 
of the cabs as well as the 
transporter that they arri¬ 
ved in. 

Maps win vote 

A SMALL Bath company 
has won a $42,000 contract 
to provide maps of San 
Diego for this week’s Re¬ 
publican Party conven¬ 
tion. Compass Maps, 
which only started export¬ 
ing its “pop-out** maps six 
months ago. has sold 
30.000 of its collapsible 
variety to be handed out 
among Bob Dole’s Repub¬ 
lican Party EaithfuL Mean¬ 
while. the company has 
sold a measly 2500 maps 
for $10,000 to the Demo¬ 
cratic Party whidi will be 
holding its convention in a 
fortnight’s time. According 
to Derek Darcey, director 
of Compass Maps: "The 
Republican Party would 
be lost without us." 

DISPOSALS are looming 
at the gas cookers and 
water pipes manufacturer 
Gfynwed but the ■chief 
executive, Bruce RdlpH 
sought to reassure the 
companys employees that 
the metals business would 
not be starved of invest¬ 
ment “It wiH,” he said at 
the presentation of inter¬ 
im results, “remain a cen¬ 
tral plank of our three- 
legged stooL " 


Will the Bundesbank finally 
abandon the monetarist ship? 


■ Germany considers 
_n gxt week whether 

to cut interest 
rates. The decision 
has far-reaching 
consequences 

H as the Bundesbank finally 
come to its senses? I had 
started to write an article 
about the dangers to the 
world economy from the growing 
possibility that the dollar's long-term 
upward trend might be temporarily 
reversed. Then suddenly yesterday 
morning the Bundesbank knocked 
away the major premiss of my 
argument 

When Otmar Issing, the 
Bundesbank chief economist told the 
International Herald Tribune that “an 
appreciation of the D-mark does not fit 
into the current economic landscape”, 
and added that the German economic 
recovery “is not yet robust", he was 
merely stating die obvious. But coming 
from Europe's most erratic economic 
institution, such elementary common 
sense inspired an amazing insight 
perhaps, after all, the Bundesbank is 
not hell-bent on an irrational cam¬ 
paign of global sabotage and national 
self-destruction. 

For months, if not years now. every 
rational observer of the global econo¬ 
my has agreed that Germany and the 
world both badly need lower German 
interest rates and a weaker mark. But 
the idea that the Bundesbank might 
finally have come to understand this 
self-evident truth was so astonishing 
that almost nobody 1 spoke to yester¬ 
day was willing to believe that Dr 
Issing really meant what he said. After 
all. Dr Issing himself told another 
paper only a few days earlier that the 
German economy was doing well, that 
a small cut in interest rates would not 
be beneficial and 'that the Bundes¬ 
bank's policy would continue to be 
governed by the money supply. 

The Bundesbank is the only central 
bank that stfll claims to operate by the 
monetarist theories discredited and 
abandoned in every other country, it is 
like the court of Pope Urban VIII, 
which continued to believe that the 
ear* was fiat after everybody else had 
realised it was round and revolved 
around the sun. 

Given this difference in philosophi¬ 
cal outlook, it is hardly surprising that 
the Bundesbank consistently does the 
opposite of what markets and other 
central bankers expect — and that so 
few people yesterday were willing to 
believe in tile sincerity of Dr Is sing's 
recantation. 

The sceptics may well prove right, 
although I personally think it was 
significant that yesterday’s statement 
came from Dr Issing rather than from 
Hans Tietmeyer.the Bundesbank Pres¬ 
ident Dr Issing has long been the main 
opponent of monetary easing, as well 
as the most convinced monetarist, on 
the Bundesbank council. He is general¬ 
ly believed to have been the leader of 
die hardline faction at last month’s 
council meeting, whidi dissuaded 
Herr Tietmeyer from pressing for 
lower rates. 

In addition. Dr Issing has repeatedly 
made it dear that he strongly opposes 
the plan to submerge the mark in a 
European Monetary Union. Thus a 
comment from him implying that he is 
having second thoughts about the 
tightness of German monetary policy 
and the strength of the mark, may 
actually cany more weight in the 
present conjuncture than a similar 


IS THE DOLL ARS BRIEF RECOVERY ALREADY OVER... 

T—. Yen 


- 350 


300 


4- 250 


- 200 



+- 150 


1 - 100 



70'72'74'76'7S ' 80 ' B2 ' 84' 88' 88' 90' 92 94' 96 

...AS THE BIG THREE’S TRADE PERFORMANCES AGAIN DIVERGE? 


i-1-1 ■ i i- , ■ i ' r V ' i-1-1-■- 1 

70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 88 88 90 92 94 96 


[“ 
r 325 


4-3.0 


h23 


r- 2.0 


h us 

1.3 


US CURRENT ACCOUNT 
As a per cent of GDP 


JAPAN CURRENT ACCOUNT 



remark from Herr Tietmeyer. who is 
known as an internationalist and an 
advocate of monetary union. 

One way or another, we will know 
soon enough whether Dr Issing was 
serious. The Bundesbank's next coun¬ 
cil meeting is a week from today. If 
there is then no rate cut those who 
believe that Germany is living in a pre- 
Copemican world will have their fears 
confirmed. 

The implications for Europe and the 
entire world economy will be dire. If, 
on the other hand, there is even a small 
rate cut. the world can heave a sigh of 
relief. Financial markets may focus 
again on fundamental values and 

businessmen will be_ 

able to think again 
about long-term eco¬ 
nomic trends. 

Why does so much 
rest on the Bundes¬ 
bank's decision? 

Because currency 
markets this summer 
seem to have reached 
a point of inflexion. If 

they continue to move _ 

in broadly the same 
direction as they have for the pasryear. 
with the dollar steadily rising while the 
yen and ihe European currencies 
return towards more competitive lev¬ 
els. the world economic recovery will 
gain further momentum and will 
spread to Europe and Japan. 

Unemployment would start to fall 
dramatically in Europe from next year 
onwards, the Japanese banks would 
gradually haul themselves out of 
bankruptcy, *the emerging economies 
could be integrated further into the free 
trade system and the global economic 
upswing could continue without seri¬ 
ous interruptions until the end of the 
decade. If, on the other hand, the dollar 
now starts to weaken, its fall could 
become precipitous, especially against 
the mark. The reason for this, ironical¬ 
ly. is that the economic fundamentals 


6 Perhaps the 
Bundesbank is 
not hell-bent 
on global 
sabotage 9 


all point to a stronger dollar in the long 
run. The trouble is that the fundamen¬ 
tal reasons for a strong dollar have 
become so obvious and widely accepted 
that investors around the world have 
built up large speculative positions in 
dollars. 

Essentially there are two lines of 
argument for a stronger dollar, which I 
have been repeating in this column 
since late 1994. First, the dollar 
remains deeply undervalued in terms 
of relative labour costs, and especially 
the relative cost and quality of skilled 
labour, which is the main determinant 
of long-term competitiveness among 
the advanced nations. Secondly, the 

_ long-term changes in 

technology, demo¬ 
graphics, fiscal policy 
and the structure of 
world trade are now 
more favorable to 
America than they are 
to Japan and Europe. 
In addition. I believe 
there is a third strong 
reason for the dollar to 
keep rising in the long 
term. This is that Eu¬ 


rope’s long-term investors such as 
pension funds (as opposed to short¬ 
term speculators) are extremely “short" 
of American equities and will eventual¬ 
ly become buyers of dollars on an 
enormous scale. But since I have not 
met a single financial analyst who 
agrees. I shall not labour this point at 
the moment 

But whatever one thinks of these 
long-term arguments for a strong 
dollar, there is no denying the Ameri¬ 
can currency is vulnerable in the short 
term. The dynamics of finandal mar¬ 
kets are such that even if speculators 
are“right” on economic grounds to buy 
dollars, they could dedde to reverse 
their positions rapidly if the 
Bundesbank plays its cards wrongly. 
The danger of such a reversal is 
particularly dear today because the 


improvement of the US trade defidt 
has temporarily stalled (largely, I 
suspect, because of the strength of 
demand in America and weak growth 
in Europe). 

- In fact, if tiie Bundesbank acts as 
foolishly next week as the Bank of 
Japan did last spring. Germany could 
suffer from a run into its currency 
every bit as disastrous as the one that 
hit Japan. The consequences would 
not, of course, be identical. Germany's 
banks would not. suffer a financial 
meltdown (although I have heard 
reports from well-placed sources that 
many of the second-tier German banks 
could prove as vulnerable to a combi¬ 
nation of recession and deregulation as 
the American savings and loans turned 
out to be 10 years ago). Instead 
Germany would be threatened by an 
industrial disaster, as its traditional 
manufacturing industries became 
completely uncompetitive in world 
markets. 

To make matters much worse, the 
malignant hardening of the mark 
would quickly spread its cancerous 
effects to the rest of Europe. France 
would obviously be the first victim, 
unless President Chirac made good on 
the vague threats about cutting loose 
from the mark that have circulated in 
Paris in the past few days. And, in the 
unlikely event that President Chirac 
did have the good sense to sever the 
franc-mark link, this would strike a 
second massive blow against German 
exports. 

One senior European central banker 
recently put it like this: if the mark 
strengthened and France abandoned 
the franc fort “a crisis for Europe 
would become a catastrophe for 
Germany". 

Will the Bundesbank risk triggering 
such a catastrophe? The world will find 
out next Thursday, but I shall be on 
holiday for two weeks in the west of 
Ireland. I will be back to survey the 
wreckage on September 5. 


Banking on 
the desired 
outcome for 
Irish TSB 

Eileen McCabe looks at the prospects 
for the sale of the state-run institution 


T he promised radical 
overhaul of the Irish 
Republic’s state bank¬ 
ing sector has now been 
whittled down to one issue. 
How can Ruairi Quinn, 
Ireland’s Finance Minister, 
sell the Trustee Savings 
Bank (TSB) to the National 
Australia Bank when Ulster 
Bank, a Nat West Bank sub¬ 
sidiary. is probably pre¬ 
pared to pay a higher price? 

The lengthy process of 
reports, committees and ne¬ 
gotiation on the future of 
three banks — the TSB. the 
Agricultural Credit Corpo¬ 
ration (ACC) and the Indus¬ 
trial Credit Corporation 
(ICC) — will end at the Cabi¬ 
net meeting on September 4. 
The role of the state banking 
sector was thrust into the 
spotlight two years ago 
when the National Australia 
Bank and the Lflster Bank 
both made offers of more 
than IrClOO million for TSB. 

Mr Quinn, a Labour Par¬ 
ly member, was widely be¬ 
lieved to want to engineer 
the disposal of the three 
banks in such a way that the 
slate would continue to exer¬ 
cise some influence over 
developments, particularly 
in relation to banking access 
for the low- 
paid and 
those on so¬ 
cial welfare. 

However, it 
now appears 
that political 
expediency 
has won die 
day. with the 

more amser- _ 

vative part¬ 
ner in the three-party gov¬ 
ernment coalition. Fine 
Gael likely to have baulked 
at the idea of serious inter¬ 
vention in the sector. 

According to well-placed 
sources, Mr Quinn is now 
likely to suggest that only 
the TSB should be sold and 
the proceeds used to inject 
much-needed capital into 
the state-owned ACC and 
the ICG He Mill also keep 
his own party and his Dem¬ 
ocratic Left colleagues hap¬ 
py by setting up a banking 
commission to examine the 
provision of quality banking 
services to welfare recipients 
and those on low pay. 

The recapitalisation sug¬ 
gestion will ruffle few feath¬ 
ers because both the ICC 
and the ACC will remain 
small players with a com¬ 
bined market share of bet¬ 
ween 3 and 4 per cent. They 
are specialist institutions set 
up to provide funding for 


6 Mr Quinn will 
need some deft 
footwork to get 
the outcome 
he favours 9 


industry and agriculture, 
and are profit-makers. Both 
have managed to carve out a 
distinctive niche in the 
market. 

The real dilemma for Mr 
Quinn is who should be 
allowed to buy (he TSB. 

Although the proceeds 
from the sale goes to the 
Exchequer, the TSB, unlike 
the ACC and the ICC is run 
by a board of independent 
trustees. They have said they 
want to be taken over by the 
National Australia Bank 
because they believe that the 
TSB’s 70 countrywide out¬ 
lets would fuse well with the 
similar-sized operations of 
the National Irish Bank 
(NIB), the Australian bank's 
Irish subsidiary. 

Fortunately for them, the 
Minister for Finance is pre¬ 
pared to give his blessing to 
that marriage, but for very 
different reasons. Sources 
say the minister is convinced 
that if the National Austra¬ 
lia Bank is not given an opp¬ 
ortunity to more than 
double its 2 to 3 per cent 
market share in the Repub¬ 
lic by acquiring TSB, it will 
simply lose interest and pull 
out altogether. From Mr 
Quinn's point of view, that 
_ would be un¬ 
desirable. It 
would proba¬ 
bly allow the 
Ulster Bank, 
which curr¬ 
ently has a 
market share 
of almost 7 
per cent, to 
mop up both 
the TSB and 
the NIB. Instead of having a 
vibrant sector with two 
giants — Allied Irish Bank 
and Bank of Ireland — snip¬ 
ing at each other over their 
combined market share of 
anywhere SO to 87 per cent 
and two medium-sized play¬ 
ers — the Ulster bank and 
the combined TSB/NIB — 
jockeying for position. Irish 
banking would have only 
three key players. 

However, Mr Quinn will 
have to perform some deft 
footwork to get the outcome 
he favours because the Ulst¬ 
er Bank has made it known 
that it is prepared to lop any 
offer from the National Aus¬ 
tralia Bank. And the whole 
decision-making process 
has taken so long that two 
other hungry contenders — 
the Irish Nationwide Build¬ 
ing Society and the Irish 
Permanent bank — are bel¬ 
ieved to have joined the pur¬ 
chase queue 



Ruairi Quinn is expected to set up a banking commission 


Putting on the Ritz to mark its 90th birthday 


M orag Preston on changes that 
show how Barclays mean business 


CL 

celebrate its 


ul on the terrace that 
overlooks Green Park, 
- Ritz Hotel will 
90th birthday 


ceieoraic w -. J 

tonight. Only eleven months 
after the reclusive Barclay 
Brothers bought one of 
London’s grandest hotels from 
Trafalgar House for E75 mil¬ 
lion. the Ritz will be showing 
off its multi-pound refurbish¬ 
ment to an increasingly corpo¬ 
rate clientele. . 

Within months of me twin 
millionaires taking the 
into private ownership, a 
growing number of business¬ 
men have made their way 
through the hotel’s Arlington 
Street entrance. Umg over¬ 
shadowed by the Savoy, wjuch 
boasts a doorway hidden from 
the main road, greater spare, 
and is situated only a cab nde 
away from the City, does this 
mean *at with private funds 
and a managing director wno 
worked for IS years at its rival 

hotel, the Ritz will relaunch 
itself as a “busings centre- 

According to Tom OCon- 
nell. general manager of the 


Ritz. who has been much 
involved in the transformation 
of the hotel back to its original 
Louis XVI splendour: “Since 
Giles Shepard has been here 
and the hotel has been in the 
hands of its present owners, 
people have been reminded of 
the Ritz as a venue. The 
Barclay Brothers are known 
and respected in the City. 
Those at the decision-making 
level in companies are swayed 
by that level of private 
ownership." 

KPMG. SG Warburg. Ernst 
& Young, Salomon Brothers, 
and Sedgwick, are among die 
companies that make frequent 
use of the Ritz. Midway be¬ 
tween home in West London 
and work in tiie City, the hotel 
is an increasingly popular 
haunt for business breakfasts 
and presentations for up to 30 
people are held twice a week 
on average over lunch and 
dinner in the hotel's Marie 
Antoinette Room. Overhead 
projectors, computers, and 
faxes are also available — hut 
only on demand. “We will 



Opulent Louis XVI decor greets visitors to tiie Ritz 


never be a high profile busi¬ 
ness hotel." says Mr O’Con¬ 
nell. adding that only 40 per 
cent of the hotel’s guests are 
there on company work com¬ 
pared with 65 per cent at the 
Savoy. "We are never going to 
be a fax/mobile phone envi¬ 


ronment. — other hotels in 
London do that much better 
than us. What we want to offer 
people is a respite from the 
business world, and there is 
dearly a market for the Ritz 
away from that" 

A similar sentiment is ech¬ 


oed by Mr Shepard, manag¬ 
ing director at the Ritz since 
December 1995, who was 
shown flic door at the Savoy 
after leading a 13-year cam¬ 
paign against Sir Rocco Forte, 
and was once quoted as saying 
that he did not wish to see 
Savoy Hotels in tiie “hands of 
a vast combine which, among 
other things, runs service sta¬ 
tions on the main arterial 
roads.” 

According to Mr Shepard, 
who has masterminded the 
installation of new air-condi¬ 
tioning and windows at the 
Ritz, and who intends to turn 
the hotel’s shops into a bar 
area: "We would never want it 
to be more than a 50/50 split 
between business and leisure. 
We prefer to have small corpo¬ 
rate parties because we can’t 
handle big ones, there is no 
point kicking against tiie size 
and shape of the building." 

Meanwhile, at the Savoy, 
where Denis Thatcher enjoys 
his favourite fish cakes and 
Jeffrey Archer had a vegetari¬ 
an sausage named after him, 
refurbishment is also taking 
place. It ought to be finished 
by autumn, around the same 
time as the Ritz*s restoration 
programme, but that is where 
the similarities end. Improv¬ 


ing business and conference 
facilities is an important part 
of the changes at the Savoy, 
where telephone, compute, 
fax and conference facilities 
have all been improved, and 
guests will soon be able to 
video conference from their 
room. 

The banqueting department 
at the Savoy hosts around six 
functions of various kinds on 
average every week. This does 
not, however, includes those 
meetings that take place in the 
hotel’s seven private rooms 
that are available for hire. In 
the bedrooms of the Savoy, no 
attempt is made to disguise the 
business facilities available. 


whereas the Ritz, the first 
London hotel to have a tele¬ 
phone in every room, makes 
every effort so that bedroom 
suites “should nor look like an 
office." 

Michael Twomey. 66, mas¬ 
ter of ceremonies at the Ritz. 
who is celebrating his 46th 
year with the hotel, has wit¬ 
nessed most of the changes 
among corporate clientele. 
“Company business used to be 
much more leisurely. People 
would come in for lunch, and 
wouldn’t leave until four." 
Much less meat is eaten now, 
and sparkling water has re¬ 
placed the brandy at the end of 
a long lunch, he says. 


Groupe Paribas 

Public tender offer of Groupe Paribas 
for Compagnie Financiere Ottomane 

Groupe Paribas, announces that following its 
public offer to purchase the entire share capital 
and all founder's shares or Compagnie Financiere 
Ottomane S.A., it held 96% of the company’s 
capital and 95% of its founders shares. 


_„ 


■ UUIWI^ - —5-*- — 


/V7 -* f 11 c 


m:., n urn rk, 


■iintilm lYinrprT nariies. to speak lor Z/M per cent. 



VY 


4 

t 


|< P © u. ro "1 rt 

















28 BUSINESS NEWS / ACCOUNTANCY 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUSTjll^ 


ALAN WELLEH 


Game is 
over for 
Nintendo 
genius 

From Robert Whymajvt 
in TOKYO 

THE creator of Game Boy. 
Nintendo’s popular video 
game, is to quit the 
company. 

The departure of 
Gumpri Yokoi, 55, who 
headed the team that devel¬ 
oped the world’s best-sell¬ 
ing hand-held 16-bit game 
machine, follows industry 
reports that sluggish sales 
would have an adverse 
impact on Nintendo’s 
profits. 

The company's shares 
were suspended in Tokyo 
yesterday as the company 
sought to allay fears that 
its sales had lien affected 
by pricecutting by rivals 
and by the lack of attractive 
software. 

Mr Yokoi, who is to 
become a consultant, is 
being blamed for sluggish 
sales of Virtual Boy, the 32- 
bit game machine, which 
he helped to develop to 
succeed Game Boy. 

Nintendo officially de¬ 
nied reports that sluggish 
sales would reduce its half- 
year profits by 70 per cent, 
and said its new 64-bit 
game machine is selling 
well in both Japan and the 
l/nited States. 

Earlier in the day 
Nintendo shares came 
under heavy selling on the 
Tokyo and Osaka stock 
exchanges after newspaper 
stories predicted a sharp 
fall in its unconsolidated 
pre-tax profit. 

Both exchanges sus¬ 
pended trading in Nin¬ 
tendo shares in the 
afternoon session. There 
have been persistent indus¬ 
try rumours that Nintendo 
64 sales have been badly 
hit by a lark of attractive 
software and by Sony cut¬ 
ting the price of its 32-bit 
Playstation. 

Nintendo holds nearly 
half the Japanese games 
market, but is up against 
aggressive competition 
from the Sony Playstation 
and Sega Enterprises’ 
Saturn. 

At a hastily organised , 
press conference Hiroshi 
Imanishi. Nintendo direc¬ 
tor. said the company ex¬ 
pects to meet its sales 
forecast for the new ma¬ 
chines in the current fiscal 



Fully covered: Michael Bright, left chief executive, and Garth Ramsay, chairman, with one of the cabs insured by Independent 

Independent Insurance sets 
sights on more acquisitions 


INDEPENDENT Insurance, 
the insurer that operates only 
through brokers, has beefed 
up its acquisitions team after 
unveiling a 15 per cent in¬ 
crease in half-year profits, to 
£16.7 million. 

The acquisitive insurer is 
seeking further deals after last 
December's purchase of La 
Palatine, a French company. 

Michael Bright, chief execu¬ 
tive. said yesterday: “We are 


actively looking for suitable 
companies to buy and we 
expect to pay for these using 
existing resources, rather than 
calling on our shareholders. 
We have drafted in both 
external and internal people to 
look at suitable acquisitions, 
both in Britain and in France.” 

Mr Bright added: "In my 
previous statement I referred 
to the irresponsible actions of 
others and the inevitable casu- 


By Robert Miulek 

alties that would result. The 
withdrawals and consolida¬ 
tions taking place within the 
industry continue to be a rich 
source of opportunity for us." 

Investment income, includ¬ 
ing La Palatine's contribution, 
rose by a substantial 87 per 
cent, to £15.5 million, while 
gross written premiums were 
up 12 per cent, to £2327 
million, in the six months to 
June 30, against £207.1 million 


in the same period last year. 
Earnings per share, excluding 
realised investment gains, in¬ 
creased to 23.6p, from 2I-5p 
last time. La Palatine made an 
underwriting loss of £35 mil¬ 
lion but is expected to break 
even by the end of the year. 

Independent rewarded share¬ 
holders by lifting the half-time 
dividend to 5Jp. payable on Oct¬ 
ober 31, up from 4.6p. Share¬ 
holder funds rose to £150.9 


Hoechst doubles in first half 


From Reuter in frankfurt 


HOECHST, the German 
chemicals and drugs group, 
more than doubled pre-tax 
profits to DM43 billion in the 
first half of 1996, and forecast 
annual profit would rise by at 
least 30 per cenL 
Latest profits were en¬ 
hanced by a net extraordinary 
gain of DM21 billion, of 
which DM1.8 billion 
stemmed from disposals. Op¬ 


erating profits rose 18 per cent 
on a comparable basis. 

Sales in die first six months 
slipped nearly I per cent, to 
DM26.1 billion. Sales volume 
increased 3 per cent but prices 
fell 3 per cent, the group said. 

Hoechst shares, among the 
most heavily traded issues in 
Frankfurt slipped five pfen¬ 
nigs to DM5125 on profit¬ 
taking on the news, after the 


market had pushed shares 
higher in anticipation of 
strong results. 

The pre-tax profit figure 
was well above analysts* fore¬ 
casts, which had ranged from 
DM256 billion to DM275 
billion. 

Hoechst is the second of 
Germany's soealled three 
chemical giants to post its 
results. Bayer reported its 


numbers on Monday and 
BASF will report its results on 
August 22 

Klaus Schmieder. chief fi¬ 
nancial officer, forecast that 
1996 pre-tax and operating 
profit would be at least 30 per 
cent higher than in 1995. 

Hoechst said that it had no 
plans for more significant 
asset sales in the second half 
of this year. 


million, from £9S.9 million. 
Within the Independent Insur¬ 
ance portfolio, commercial 
pro perry produced gross writ¬ 
ten premiums of £363 million, 
against £47.7 million Iasi rime. 
This led to an underwriting 
loss of £1.6 million, compared 
with a £26 million profit. The 
IRA bomb in Manchester cost 
Independent £1 million net of 
reinsurance. 

On the home front, and in 
spite of adverse weather 
claims, the group still deliv¬ 
ered an underwriting profit of 
£200.000. albeit well down on 
last year’s £23 million contri¬ 
bution. In motor business. 
Independent Insurance saw 
gross written premium fall by 
14 per cent, to £13.9 million, 
against £16.1 million last time. 

In the international division 
gross written premium was 
£172 million, with an under¬ 
writing loss of £3 million, 
compared with a previous 
profit of £200.000. 

The market marked the 
share up [Op, to dose at 500p. 

Diary, page 27 


[ BUSINESS ROUNDUP_ 

German business 
failures continue 

THE sharp rise in German 1rompanie^goingbmalhan in 
May. with 59.1 percent more co P ^8 Federa i statistics 

the same month of ** registered a total of 

Office said yesterday. Geftnj" “Jg? regist business 

2601 insolvencies in M . ay v seen since the 

failures. “The rise m Business 

end of 1991 is continuing, the staUsncsomce 
failures in western Germany rose 3.4iy^ 
1,493. while in eastern Germany business insolvencies 

"YnKSS fivemonths of the ye^Gem^^reported 
a iota! of 10,412 business failures thro ^^f l sl lh . 
rise of 16.6 per cent from the same P er ^ od _ jn J y } u: 5 nenaj 
Business failures in western Germany dunng P? 
rose 9.1 per cent to 7599. while in eastern Germany business 
insolvendes rose 40.4 per cent to 3.013. 

Eastern in gas link 

EASTERN, the electricity generation, distribution and gas 
business, has locked into a long-term £1 million gas■ «ntra« 
after boosting its gas business to become the seoand largest 
plaver after British Gas. Eastern Natural Gas has sgn^drab 
with Lasmo and British Borneo to buy gw^mtte Boutan 
field in the North Sea for the duration of its life - expected to be 
about 16 years. Eastern is owned by Hanson and is due to be 
floated next year as a separate company. 

Xenova research deal 

XENOVA, the UK biotechnology company listed on Nasdaq, 
has announced an extension of its collaboration with Parke- 
Davis, part of Warner Lambert, the healthcare group. Parke- 
Davis has begun further research on a potential anri-bactena! 
drug discovered by Xenova. The Slough-based company also 
reported reduced first-half losses of £3.15 million (£5 million). 
Xenova said this reflected reduced research and development 
spending. The firm ended the half with EI02 mill]on cash. 

Dell profits up by 58% 

DELL Computer Corporation, the company that pioneered 
direct marketing of FCs. made record profits before tax of 
$103 million (£665 million) during its second quarter, a 58 per 
cent rise on the same period last year. Quarterly sales jumped 
by 40 per cent, to $1.69 billion, with LffC sales growing twice 
as fast as the market Michael Dell, chief executive, said the 
company had excelled on every measure of performance- Dell 
ended the quarter on July 28 with nearly $1 billion in cash. 

Ferry result hits Jacobs 

SHARES in Jacobs Holdings, the car transportation group, fell 
by 8 per cent to 67p yesterday after the company announced 
disappointing results from Dart Line, the freight ferry joint 
venture that operates from Dartford to Holland. The group as 
a whole increased first-half pre-tax profits to £1.7 million. 
Jacobs has virtually eliminated borrowings after the £126 
million sale of the Kingsway Retail Park in Derby and other 
disposals. The interim dividend is 0375p. payable in October. 

Brandon quadruples 

BRANDON HIRE, the tool and catering equipment hire 
company, reported a strong first-half, with pre-tax profits more 
than quadrupling to £901,000. Group sales rose by 51 per cent 
to £9.9 million, while earnings, after adjusting for exceptional 
items, increased by 30 per cent to 3p a share. Brandon recently 
bolstered its catering equipment business through the 
acquisition of Jongor from Wembley. An interim dividend of 
0.9p a share, up 20 per cent will be paid in December. 


ACCOUNTANCY 


Respect for the tried and tested 


Rod Hill and John Everett report 
how a survey of finance directors 
reassures, yet prompts concern 


N ever let it be said that 
finance directors do 
not have a sense of 
Fun. It has just surfaced briefly 
in the 1996 financial manage¬ 
ment survey conducted by rite 
Chartered Institute of Man¬ 
agement Accountants (CIMA) 
and Deloitte & Touche Con¬ 
sulting Group. 

More than half of the 561 
finance directors in leading 
British companies who were 
approached (actually 54 per 
cent of them) were prepared to 
go along with the notion that 
their financial books will be in 
"real time” by die year 2000. 
However, it is dear that even 
the questioners suspected they 
were having their legs pulled 
by the replies. "Can the ac¬ 
countants' dream of dosing 
the books at the touch of a 
button really be that close?” 
the survey editors ponder. 

Press-button accounting 
and rime for golf every after¬ 
noon may still be some dis¬ 
tance ahead for finance 
directors. Meanwhile, the new 
survey, which covers com¬ 
panies with a combined turn¬ 
over exceeding £75 billion and 
employing more than 500,000 
people, is candid and reveal¬ 
ing. Indeed, it manages to 
achieve the opposites of being 
both reassuring and worrying 
about aspects of the current 
state of UK financial manage- 


Music to 
their ears 

CHANTREY VELLACOTT 
appears to have a bit of a 
coup on its hands. 

Jerome Walton, the acc¬ 
ountant whose famous dients 
in the music business indude 
Pink Floyd and the Rolling 
Stones, has dedded that the 
independent life is no longer 
right for him. He has just 
joined Chan trey Vellacott as a 
partner. It is, as jazz musi- 


menL On the credit side of the 
ledger, it emphasises that 
businesses are using sound 
Gnandal management better 
and more effectively than at 
any time in the past Business¬ 
es are measuring the right 
things to bring about the 
better functioning of the enter¬ 
prise. Finance directors are 
generally satisfied that their 
departments are working 
properly. And there is a high 
level of agreement on how 
things will change in the 
future. 

An overwhelming 91 per 
cent of the finance directors 
surveyed believe that their 
finance function adds value to 
their business, prompting the 
report’s conclusion: “There is 
dearly a lot of good feeling." 
We do wonder, in passing, 
whether rite 9 per cent who 
disagreed with the proposition 
might be well advised to take 
up another line of work. 

On the debit side of the 
ledger the survey suggests an 
inclination to stick to the tried 
and tested rather than em¬ 
brace new ideas. The editors 
acknowledge that "the levels of 
awareness of financial man¬ 
agement tools and techniques 
were low ... where the tech¬ 
niques had been used they had 
not been as successful as 
might have been expected”. 
This comes as no surprise to 



Rod Hill, left and John Everett No need for golf lessons yet 


CIMA. which has continued to 
put considerable effort into 
training in. and awareness of, 
the latest management tools 
and techniques for financial 
managers. 

Paul Fuller, one of the 
survey editors and a partner at 
Deloitte & Touche Consulting 
Group, finds it disappointing 
that only 13 per cent or finance 
directors understand value 


dans would point out. nice 
work if you can get it. And 
with the Rolling Stones it has 
the added benefit in the fees. 

As Chris Sandford pointed 
out in his classic biography of 
Mick Jagger. the Rolling 
Stones lead singer “He had a 
morbid fear of losing all his 
money." Accountants have 
been hard at work reassuring 
hint ever since, 
c 


Circuit judge 

IF YOU do not know your 
non-ACMP-adequate collater¬ 
al from your duratiorcbased 
approach, then you oould be in 
trouble. But help is at hand. 
Coopers & Lybrand has pro¬ 
duced an extraordinary wall 
chan that looks more like a 
drcuit diagram for a complex 
telecoms system than the 


management, only 24 per cent 
understand business process 
re-engineering, and only 42 
per cent understand activity- 
based management. He sug¬ 
gests that those weaknesses 
may point to the reason (as the 
survey also shows) less than 25 
per cent of financial manage¬ 
ment projects achieve their 
targets. 

When it comes to measuring 


“financial jungle briefing” that 
it says it is. For Investment 
Services Directive firms it pro¬ 
vides a guide to how to comply 
with the SPA'S capital adequa¬ 
cy rules. To get your copy, con¬ 
tact Paul Sanders on 0171 212 
5279. 

Counted out 

DELEGATES to next months 


organisational performance, 
profit is by far the most widely 
used measure among finance 
directors. It is followed by 
cashflow and turnover. Share 
price-related measures are the 
least widely used. More than 
90 per cent of the respondents 
rated profit as the prime 
measure of performance, com¬ 
pared with 72 per cent sup¬ 
porting quality measures. 73 
per cent sales volume and 
working capital, and 80 per 
cent customer service levels. 

L ooking to the future, 
more than 70 per cent of 
foe finance directors 
surveyed believe that there 
will be stronger pressures to 
reduce finance costs, to auto¬ 
mate basic accounting sys¬ 
tems, and to move towards 
folly integrated total business 
systems such as Oracle and 
SAP. However, only 30 per 
cent believe that the use of 
appropriate systems will bring 
about reductions in the staff¬ 
ing of financial departments. 

The implication is that fi¬ 
nance department empires 
will be heavily defended 
against cutbacks planned in 
the name of automation. No 
need to book the golf lessons 
yet! 

Rod Hitt is president of CIMA, 
and John Everett is managing 
partner at Deloitte & Touche 
Consulting Group. 

Financial Management Survey 
1996: The current state of 
financial management in UK 
PLC. published by CIMA and the 
Deloitte & Touche Consulting 
Group, is available from CIMA 
Publishing on 0171-9179229. 


annual General Practitioners’ 
conference, organised by foe 
English fCA in Cambridge, 
could be in for a very short 
after-dinner speech. Ian 
Nichol of Coopers & Lybrand 
is the star turn. Among other 
offerings he has been known 
to speak on is the subject of 
"The Joy of Accounting". He 
claims to have got that partic¬ 
ular lecture, for all its enthrall¬ 
ing subject matter, down to a 
mere 17 seconds. 

Robert Bruce 


Blowing the whistle 
on a big-money game 


FOOTBALL is a desperately limited game. Take the example of the champions. 
Who would invent a game in which the ball Manchester United’s turnover, says the 
is propelled around a pitch by the bluntest of report rose 38 per cent with increases in all 
blunt instruments — the feet and the head? It business areas but boosted by a huge leap in 
is no wonder that the skills employed are so merchandising and other sales to 
much less complex and sophisticated com- million — an increase of 65 per cent and a 71 
pared with most other sports. And it is small per rent increase in television revenue to £6.8 
wander that the actual games themselves are million. As for the actual football itself gate 
more likely to be stunningly dull than receipts rose a relatively modest 10 per cent 
wonderfully exciting. But that as football It needs a marketing expert to fathom out 
fans know, is not the point the future. At present football, to put it at its 

Fans go for the passion of the crowds, not simplest is buoyed by sales of fancy shirts at 

the game. It is. as a friend pointed out the mammoth mark-ups. It is very hard for 
only place left where people can fed part of anyone to predict how long that can carry on 
some roaring tribal gathering. The sector the dubs are selling to is cash-rich 

This odd disconnection between the sport but relatively unsophisticated 
and the .reason its supporters torn up is It is against this background that football 
reflected in the way the game has developed, dubs are now being lured into the idea of 
At this punt of the footballing year it has going for a listing. “It is our view " savs 
become a tradition that Gerry Boon, Deloitte Ddoitte & Touche, “that by the veai- 20«I 

« Touche’s expert on the subject, sends his there are likely to be 12 or 15 football Hnh* 
firm’s annual review of football finance which have a fisting on either the main Stock 
down the tunnd and out onto the pitch. As Exchange or the Alternative InvSS 
*** - Market There are afoSted 

tSEnt* " ^ "“ft" dubs thlTSS 

The cash from people .ft our v?ew" S The^Sort l ? 

turning up to watch the fl WBBBW jliiife not sav hnw report do® 

games continued to slide as a listing hut ^°. r 

percentage of the sport’s total ftSsHL I® lv tdf’vnu 1 ^PP 1- 

income. It is now down to 42 JL V wihout naming 

per cent Wages and salaries mBK jCSSs/fiS? four is »h#.°4] at 

continued to spiral upwards comes m tbat 

and now absorb 52 per cent __ v ™ nc *''.h e 

of the game's total income. institutional in- 

Overall the game made a igsL amnmir . a smai! 

pre-tax loss of £14.1 million ? e P sib,est0ck -" 

on a total income of £468 rJ?,u5i C new future of 

million. As Boon himself lsted on a 

will reli you. football is full of mari ' el b 3150 

paradoxes. The biggest is the j-J.” end rn tears for most 

gulf between the Premier- Dnocnrr foe v, n< * 5^ u * ,s ‘ ® ne °f 

ship dubs and the rest “It ROBERT _orfP^ ,Ke Touche ro- 

used to be a gap.” says Boon. BrIJCF Iterinn”?'-2_‘ or * successful 

“This year Ka gulf. Next DKUU wUi5!L“ the ability, and 

year it will be a yawning •p|a~ S r eSS I.i t ?. <,ea * "^h l h e 

Jfaasm.” Front being a oubfo- 

He is right Manchester United and that which normallv ln . addit ion to 

Newcastle United together have a greater Given foe game's tll^ lo Football-, 
turnover than the whole of Division One. abilities, foe future of foeh r ^ cord such 
The average operating profit for a Premier- game is far from briehL Dus,ncss end of the 
ship dub was £224 million. The other Even with the money whirl, . , 
divisions have only operating losses. In the merchandising and rh^ TIj - Urs ,n from 
Division One the average operating loss was foe game, according m R ™'". evis,on rights. 
£703.000. And the top dubs have scooped the a platform for foe futur?°?i i “ no1 bu, 'Wing 
income: 69 per cent of the income goes to just about squared it done is 

Premiership dubs. you look airooibajl f'™ When 

So football has a problem. The product, the no thine maU financial ancle. 


Robert 

Bruce 


So football has a problem. The product the 
?rtuai games themselves, do not produce 
significant income. But. as Boon would 
argue, without the product you will not sell 

the shirts, keep the television people interest¬ 
ed or bring in the sponsorship. 


nothing makes sense. ""ancial angle 

that poss?on h^s'n^ b ^° ney Same. But 
profits." We ail know into 

enterprises whose turnov^?iL happens to 

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3E)W 279® + 0((l 
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196(0 209.® . QIC 

7947 84(4 . 015 

250® 26660, 4 0,0 

£85® 90201 + o,D 

5997 0.80 ♦ 018 

£11® 72510 - 130 

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5dJ9 

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STEWART IVORY IMT TST MGRS LTD 
0131 2263271 

Anion 515 tO 55060 

Bruce f ITtOTD 157 SO 

EnragCAfc lE-ffl 173 ID 

EtoSnMllCo fflffl 

rim ISffl 

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-to Aeon 474 ID 

hr lira) Au XC2C 

UqdEqut, 204® 

UngdLratt 9534 


7UK 

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(04*4 - 010 I® 
3.030 - Offl 0® 
£10501 1 74 

VWt 4 001 518 


SWIALUWCE U8T TST MGMT LTD 
EaqofVl 0127727 300 DratigT 01277 880189 


1164 DO 112/M 
1**. 50 709 10 


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SCHRQ0GI UWT TRUSTS LTD 
Ctt 0800 (2G S3S BM-0800 528 540 
Rrtill Fanfc 


Aomen 
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Fk Liston Sh 
to-Acran 
SU & Food kt # 
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to Ararat# 
Grid Ere tas 
to- Ann 
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PaBote 
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Sab 

toAcan 

iiKiUata 

Magfehc 

SnrgfeAcr 

lee 

toAcan 
IK Eraser fee 
■to team 
LKEuto 
to-Auan 
USStata 
toAsotel 
kciluUaRdFris 


BSC 3MS3 
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11321 120 7(1 


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68.65 73 £2 
15690 169*91 


164® 

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175(71 

100.01 


toAcan 

Emteata 

toAcran 

GridEteNhc 

r Srita 
Iran 

UqdBKrad 

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to Anno 


47(1 506/ 

31660 33664 

lVH 106X4, 
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I3£22 Ml® 
sax, 350 731 
406(3 43341, 

29085 118771 
604 05 644331 

2218/ 236X6 

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SCnrnSH AIKABlE UT MGRS LTD 
0141 204 am 

EgOftm 5747 60 77 . 

hlltvlrua 7639 /S./3 t 

EaaraSteao 9959 9474 4 

BungtmlAps 10658 11314 4 

It Santo Cas 8155 8824 + 

umnte 4SJ> foots + 

Jgine ®T3 8637 * 

fcofadk l?7 B 134/2 • 

NMriar 1312? 138® - 


SCOTTISH EQUITABLE FD MGRS LTD 
080045443 
tat 

LOfinrihc 
toAcran 

U team 
toAcran 


015 313 
OJO £34 

043 ir 

021 042 
0J8 097 
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074 a/i 
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33® 

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SCOTTISH UFE ItntSTISENTS 
013122S 2211 

UKEqutr 4/7 10 5W6D 

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PMffl 42020 44910 

Eaopan 095.10 /43« 

WBktaJr 104® 11190 


scams, mutual 

0141 £48 6100 

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toAcan 

FaEsteshc 

toAcan 

ttnecM 

KAmraihc 

toAtsfll 


HV61GRS LTD 

323 70 2*410 
42410 451 JO 
77350 291M 
336‘XI 36800 


Si 73 
£23 


89 GJ 
87 59 


4B50 4GF40 
49800 52900 

TK» Ifflffl 
215® 228» 

63 39 67 44 

31560 05® 

34900 SKI 


£80 

- £B 03D 
4 0X0 0J3 

- 2» 110 

044 


. QJO 193 

+ ojq m 

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* 070 1 33 

- 0US 1/2 
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- 290 0* 

- 330 0 96 

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060 D73 
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* 210 019 


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ItmaucGnn 
5JGAU 

km & (cane Er 
Ea Ope ra EdM I 
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l>SEega 


£40! 

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LTD 

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152401 
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Admdi 8 Entf 0,71 60**044 [kg 0171 606 6010 
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Ukhcom-kic 
Uqdtdrebb # 

Sfegd Hgp) Yld Inc 
ttagd inXGintac 
IK Sraate ta 
hdKtrmPan 


TS8 IMT TRUSTS 
01264346 794 
Amakte 
toAcran 
M Grata 
to Aeon 
EuDfOT 
toAcan 

Eaakmre 

to Actum 
CnuAa ta 
to- Accan 
teed 
to Actta 
fnrala iun*c 
to Accm 
tan, 
to Aeon 
Frirtr 
to Accun 


S/M 

61X4 

001 


4.28 

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003 


59 1? 

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j.-i 

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to Aeon 
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to Aeon 
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toAcan 

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toAcan 

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to Accra 
tana ham 
to Aaaii 


«SI6 
128® 
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206-M 
389 7/ 
9064 
10141 
346 Jl 
TT897 
6090 
ISAS 
367 ** 
850 £3 
43627 
45041 
64035 
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77 70 
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84 31 
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21904 
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- 037 5:-0 

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♦ DJ3 0 71 

* 026 1111 
.014 £11 


7B30A1 4 OJO ? 11 
S302, . 003 6 65 
131 76, . 0® *65 
DM 346 


38885 
•99 71 
461 a 
48509 
67761 
80285 
21, W 
13583 
1/715 
©221 
77 gr 
9016 
7,7*1 
97 B, 
683< 
«L££ 
THEM 
8721 


346 

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l£7 

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TUEUM) MANAGERS LOOTED 
D181 087 1018 
BitKlr 404 7, 

Etehcan 7147 


W601 - 018 £57 

7690 - 111? Iffl 


TEMPLETON UWT TRUST MGRS LTD 
01314694000 

Offl Grata he 234® SOUS, Offl 220 

OfflBdwdhc 196 72 ?T0ffl - 044 321 

Urid T9 to 143 79 16) 79 - 0*7 1 92 


THCANTDN IMT UANAGSE LTD 
0171 MG »00 Dwfflv 0171246 3001 
EnaknEaM 454/ 4/27 


Eafflom Gata 

ta^EmUS 

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34526 361(2 
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606/ 


8/56 

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*35 ICC® 
£91 08 304 79 

fflJS 505? 
130 FB 1X84 
30101 31603 

7553 7908 

COS 68103 
(IFK Vt Jit 
JEM Dlffi 
IDS 145*6 
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- 014 5® 

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- 146 3 40 
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4 1.92 (LTD 
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UWTED FHENF4Y UT TST MGUT LTD 
01277 GOD 336 


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VnGH DBECIPFSLTD 
D345956S05 

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IM 79 
12880 


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WAVEH1IT UM1 TST IIGMT LTD 
0131 231551 
Auoralzln Gold 
PUflrBzxm 
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2990 1147 - 019 

44(3 4087 - 021 

08966 D9S9 -0OQ5 

4674 4919 4 001 


irUTTHGOAll INI T51 M0AI LID 
01/18E3 24<4 
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l&GaABdIUSSI 
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7GSB 9011 - (UI2 

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VWaWCH MSI TRUST IttRS LTD 
01812984000 

WHpd 55fi£ 59® -Oil 1® 

iKteccnrau iffl.® i 06 » !a . 

Coxo«boa 4905 @19 - 0D8 899 

Sowee FI Womaicn 

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toft Ln» Cte*W 


ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 


S£ <19 MM Dm 
E 5 SOD Ota Jftl 
<31 95 Bun Stomal 

775 615 U bib uib a 

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563 535 After ® 59l • 4 50 108 

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5537% 4071'. CXnpt 55M - 25 
392 318 Do* Sit 339 3 3 150 

£157% £131'-Corona £151%- 46>. 35 

1350 1Q6P.O* Idil Un r HH0%- «'• 05 

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1169 931 nsac 
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1995 

ttqa Un Connor 


558 426 Sauna 
26 IB BtM Gp 

ill 78 EW Firings 
SO 245 uryns 
160 105 CmBidt 

107V 78 dories SKtay 

79 Mvcoa axn 

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434 33 Oetas 

407 32E Becfeamupnts 

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134 65 Eteris* 

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975 296 (Vac K*ftm 

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292 716 Huns (IWpj 

293 200% Katas 

200 112 Hotas Talit 

190 153 BA H 

316 231 Mon 

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251 169 Keft-RS 

389 799 Lb Sotel 

155 119 Latent 

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9% B'-UOAoe'® 

47 31 »*KlfcS 

565 440 Hotatal 

149 230 Hatentw 

162 108 PCTC 

341 27? Pendsan 

211 145 Peny B_. 

745 602 Plena F*ri 

190 115 QK»S Sow 

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Shares edge up in slow trading 


TRADING PERIOD: Settlement takes place five business days after the day of trade. Changes are calculated on 
the previous day's dose, but adjustments are made when a stock is ex-dividend. Changes, yields and 
price/eamings ratios are based on middle prices. 


1996 

PW» 


its 

P.t 

Hft 

urn Gwony 

IP) 

+/- 

% 

St 

200 Ouamrilc 

278 


39 

162 

18 

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39 


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85 



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1 1568% 1187% Sff D" 

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36 

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99 


45 

167 

278 

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263 


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272 

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ENGINEERING, VEHICLES 

DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIALS 


BREWERIES, PUBS & REST 


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126 

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177 151 Efttnd Brwt 167 41 151 

125V 92 Or* Coot Hea 117 - G 24 220 

821 463 Coopts Go 554 + 1% 18 264 

256 ISO Eltaije P A C 264 23 24 3 

540 413 FdkSo A’Ot 505 23 17 2 

636 546 Gras* C« 574 + 3 3 2 155 

571 56T.&wnp tiojT 620 31 1*6 

285 207 Groswar ins 210-7 35 

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355 312 Matted I 314 - ? 2.3 153 

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255 ITP-Rend tan 219 - 1 03 34 4 

700 601 Scot I ■•*£ 662V + 6 3 7 229 

365 305 Tom CaUetyt 330 + 2 1 6 358 

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683 573 WOitnnLi 0 618 32 141 

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ELECTRONIC & ELECT 


BUILDING MATERIALS 


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500 335 Jdnaon 
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400 346 Boots 370 

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198 171 Ccmira* 179 

444 M3 Odsatr 352 

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114 92 Kt&amlFai « 

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T HE TfM ^ iT>UJRSDAYAt JGUST , 5 lgg( . 



31 


■ FILM] 

Heavy guilt, 
heavy drama, as 
ftck Nicholson 
stars in Sean 
Penn’s The 
Crossing Guard 



■ FILM 2 

... while a 
deglamourised 
Sharon Stone 
goes onto Death 
Row in the 
limp Last Dance 


ARTS 



B FILM 3 

Johnny Depp is 
the unwilling 
assassin in 
the passable but 
unexceptional 
Nick of Time 



■ FILM 4 

The short but 
powerful Hunger 
Artist reveals 
British director 
Bernard Rudden as 
a name to watch 


> — 




' GeoffBrown watches a star’s second celluloid creation sink under the weight of its own portentousness 





Penn portrait 
shaded with 


a heavy hand 


eviewing The Indian 
Runner, Sean Penn's first 
fling as a writer and 

tu fir 0 * 1 * 1 . ex P ns scd the 
nope that he might have “washed 

^eindulgait gloom from his 
system when he came to make 
film number two. Fat chance Lcxric 
at The Crossing Guard. Freddy a 
divorced jeweller who fritters away 
his nights in topless bars, an¬ 
nounces his intention to avenge 
ntmself cm John Booth, the drunk 
drrver who killed his seven-yestr- 
olddaughter. Booth, just released 
from prison, carries tits own men¬ 
tal burden, so much so that he 
frightens away friends. “I think 
your guilt is a little too much 
competition for me," says JoJo the 
painter, a sensitive flower. “You 
should let me know when you want 
life." Heavy thoughts. Heavy 
words. Heavy film. 

Yet even supposing you could 
actually lift it. no one should toss 
this film aside. Where most actors 
who turn directors strut like pea¬ 
cocks or muscle in on the big- 
budget action genre. Sean Penn 
uses his new power to stay off¬ 
screen and make modern-day 
tragedies with limited box- 
ice appeal. In fills arena he may 
not be a match for his obvious 
mentor. John Cassevetes. but his 
ambitions still deserve respect 
. And if Penn'S ambitions often 
exceed his talent be knows how to 
draw on the talents of others. Jade 
Nicholson is the jeweller and David 
Morse his intended victim, while 
Anjdica Huston eerily shadows her 
own past relationship with Nichol¬ 
son. playing his ex-wife and spar¬ 
ring partner. With such a cast, how 
can you not keep watching? 

Nicholson and Huston’S scenes 
together are few. but they raise the 
temperature in a film that sadly 
grows ever more lugubrious as 
characters consume themselves 
with guilt or hate. Humour bubbles 
up when Nicholson’s demons (and 
eyebrows) start ascending and he 
lets fly at an irate customer 
returning a ring. Later, unintended 
laughter creeps in when our Jack, 
scarcely in prime condition, is 
chased interminably over streets, 
fences and gardens: a sequence that 
suggest Penn’s forte will never be 
Choreographing action. 

For this film to work we need 


The Crossing Guard 

Curzon West End. 15. 115 mins 
Portentous family drama 
from Sean Penn 

Last Dance 

Odeon Haymarket 
18.105 mins 
What's Sharon Stone 
doing on Death Row? 

Nick of Time 
National Film Theatre 
80 mins 

Why must Johnny Depp fall 
the Governor of California? 

Hunger Artist 

1CA Cinematheque, 65 mins 
Promising British director 
leaves a calling card 


more chinks of light to penetrate 
the portentous gloom, and more 
signs of control from a director who 
means well but is apt to jump on 
any passing stylistic trick. Slow- 
raotion photography, for instance 
We scarcely need such underlining 
to remind us that some piece of 
action is meaningful. In The Cross¬ 
ing Guard, for better or worse, 
everything is meaningful. 

Last Dance also intends to be 
taken seriously. Look at its star, 
Sharon Stone. Coarse, reddish 
hair. A scar on her neck. A tattoo on 
her right hand. And an unflattering 
prison uniform. She is on Death 
Row in same unspecified southern 
stale, a piece of white trash faring 
death by lethal syringe for a double 
murder co mm itted 12 years ago. 
Like Sean Penn’s character in 
Dead Man Walking, her guilt is 
never in question — but that does 
not stop Rob Morrow, the rookie 
lawyer at the state Clemency 
Board, from turning her case into a 
crusade. The trouble is. after Tim 
Robbins’s powerful film, who 
wants to see “Dead Woman Walk¬ 
ing”. especially when she limps? 

Not that the film's weakness is 
Stone's fault The fictitious role of 
convicted killer Cindy Liggett may 
not stretch her talents as much as 
the drunken Las Vegas wife in 
Casino. Yet she does the job 
honestly enough, and neatly 
gauges the shifts in attitude from 


the hard nut longing for death to 
the improved character who learns 
to touch and feel, and to draw file 
Taj Mahal. But we stiff end up not 
caring two figs whether Cintfy 
meets her Maker. 

For all its jousting with life and 
death. Last Dance is weirdly 
perfunctory. Bruce Beresford, the 
film's wayward director, is still 
searching for something to top 
Driving Miss Daisy, he gets the 
scenes shot but does nothing to lift 
them out of the ordinary. Ron 
KosloWS script can be sharp 
enough in peripheral scenes: there 
is an amusing encounter with a 
bumptious black killer turned au¬ 
thor on Death Row (“How they 
gonna kill a man who's been on the 
New York Times bestseller list?”). 
But when it matters most, the 
words turn flat and painful emo¬ 
tions get wrapped in tinsel. 

Rob Morrow, most familiar from 
the television series Northern Ex¬ 
posure. does not help as the rookie 
lawyer trying to make amends for 
his cushioned life by doing some¬ 
thing good. He looks cute but acts 
bland. You never feel the fire in his 
belly. Sharon Stone fans will 
doubtless be curious to see their 
idol de-glamourised; the rest of us 
can safely pass this last dance by. 

Stargazers may get another sur¬ 
prise watching Nick of Time. 
Johnny Depp usually plays charac¬ 
ters with long hair, a yen for cross¬ 
dressing and scissors for hands. 
But here he is the ordinary Joe 
caught in an extraordinary situa¬ 
tion- Collar and tie. Meek little 
specs. Hair that behaves. 


i 



J 



He may look a charmer, but Jack Nicholson is a man consumed by bitterness and the desire for revenge in The Crossing Guard 


A; 


reiving with his daughter 
ai Union Station, Los 
Angeles, he is yanked 
.aside by Christopher 
Walken, and given a gun and an 
impossible choice. Within 80 min¬ 
utes he must kill the Governor of 
California, headquartered at a 
downtown hotel during a re-elec¬ 
tion campaign. If he fails, his 
kidnapped daughter will die. And if 
he shoots too soon, the film will die: 
for what can you fill the time with 
except suspense, plot twists and 
endless mutierings over walkie- 
talkies? 

Forty years ago, this would have 
made a crisp tittle B-movie. The 
surprise is that such a modest 


venture emerges now under the 
auspices of John Badham. a direc¬ 
tor known for overblown nonsense 
such as Bird on a Wire. As 
underblown nonsense. Nick of 
Time remains a passable 
timewasier. although our interest 
might be raised a notch if the script 
gave us a hint of why California's 
Governor (Marsha Mason) de¬ 
served to die. And we might be even 
happier if the movie were not 
playing at the National Film The¬ 
atre, which has better things to do 
than serve as a dumping-ground 
for American flops soon to appear 
on video. 

But enough of soft-drink cinema, 
you may say: where can I find the 
hard stuff? Since this is high 
summer, you have to look carefully. 
Up in Scotland, the Drambuie 
Edinburgh International Festival is 
now under way. offering every¬ 
thing from Peter Greenaway and 
music videos to The Goat Horn. 
the hottest Bulgarian film of the 
1970s (a full report follows next 
week). Down in London, after 


breaking records at the Riverside 
Studios, Renoir’s wonderful classic 
La Rigle du Jeu begins a two-week 
run at the Screen on the Hill 

Then at the ICA Cinematheque, 
the most dedicated followers of 
cinema’s muse should find nour¬ 
ishment with Bernard Rudden *s 
Hanger Artist, one of the most 
remarkable British films to emerge 
last year. Two other British shorts. 
Abioor Dewshi's Anton O Minty 
and Nick Gordon-Smith's Fatima. 
complete the ICA’s programme. 

Hunger Artist lasts 45 minutes 
but Rudden makes every second 
count as he blends razor-sharp 
black-and-white imagery with pro¬ 
vocative commentary in a story 
inspired by Kafka. Britain’s last 
fasting artist has been kidnapped 
by crooks from his cage at the local 
zoo. A woman journalist pursues 
the trail through a bleak urban 
landscape, raising sensitive issues 
of poverty and greed. Rising up in a 
summer of so much flaccid image¬ 
making. the film’s intensity is 
staggering. 


‘Explosion of genius’ 

a 


Every week, young film fans discuss 
the latest releases ... 


THE CROSSING GUARD 
Ntcki Thomas, 22: Some nice 
directorial touches in a film that 
boasts fine acting and creative use 
of camera. 

Abi Naish. 21: At last, an explosion 
of genius. Turning Hollywood 
stereotypes on their heads, this film 
is incredibly refreshing. 

Bex Taylor. 21: One of the mast 
invigorating, cathartic films I have 
ever seen. This film dances with 
life. 

Derek Griffin. 18: Good acting and 
a storyline which is easy to follow. 

LAST DANCE 

Nicbh Cliched Hollywood slush 
that is predictable and tiresome. 
No Oscar nominations here. 

Abi: This fulfils the requirements 
of every Hollywood movie, while 



SNAP 

VERDICT 


destroying the real issues in an 
alarming cascade of tasteless cli¬ 
ches. A great disappointment for a 
film with great potential. 

Bex: Beresford*s film continues to 
portray our banal view of life on 
Death Row with a sentimentality 
that can only be called kitsch. 
Derek: A very emotional film with 
a few sarcastic comments and 
gestures where needed, to even out 
those tear-jerking moments. 


Old China reflected in new steel 

John Parry views the 
metal sculptures by 
Yuyu Yang that 
currently dominate 
Chelsea Harbour 


H is work is inspired and star¬ 
tling. He has exhibited in 
France. Italy. America. Brazil, 
Hang Kang and Japan. In recent 
decades he has been among the most 
innovative and prolific Chinese sculp¬ 
tors and one of the few to have found 

an audience in the West. But for 
whatever reasons, his work has never 
t been to Britain before. So for the Royal 
Society of British Sculptors to choose 

the 70 -year-old Chinese artist Yuyu 

Yang as its first International Fellow 
both acknowledges the sculptor’s stat¬ 
ure and provides us with an oppormru- 
ty to sec his work here for the first nme. 
■ Chelsea Harbour may be an archi¬ 
tectural hotchpotch itself, butw pro¬ 
vides an effective outdoor setting for 

some very dramatic and anginal pieces 

fTdosil works. 

nine more startlingly m stainless sted. 
brilliantly polishedand reflecting 

- as Rodin and Gracc^. £ 

rooted firmly m a " oent 

j . senes 

■ nfestJL. iHs Hied with symbolic 
Df^capre. , and the phoenix. 

wmm 



Vm/n Yans and Solar Permanence: positioned against the backdrop of 
foe main Chelsea Harbour tower, it shines in foe sun or the night lights 


sculpture, ftuiiux u u ■- 
sheer bulk, it is also a fine example of 
how the artist uses his love of nature. 

Yang was bom in Taiwan but 
educated in China, Japan and Italy. 
When he returned from Rome to 


iife of 

the bleak he raoroou uu ... lu 

Chelsea Harbour When^ setiledm theTarako 

approa^' - r yang's works is a * region with its spectacu- the sun or me nigni ng™ 5 - « 13 « 

com P| e ?' . j s great drama afoot- limestone gorge. Mountain Gran- dragon, the symbolic representation of 

itor/TSStalwn years later, is a thTsun. and the creature's hollow eye 
metres high in lonely . ^_ ^ 

rii-irvhrtiHrr'i lYmrerf nnrTies. lu speak lor ZIM per cent. 


„ have 
prepare you for the 
elegant charm of a 
stainless steel work such as Solar 
Permanence. Carefully positioned to 
have a backdrop of the main Chelsea 
Harbour tower, it wriihes and twists 
upwards, four metres high, shining in 
the sun or the night lights. It is a 


is a neat metaphor for the solar disc 

Yang uses steel to even greater effect 
with Lunar Brilliance. This mirrored 
disc is an inversion of the traditional 
Moon gate of the Chinese garden. 
Instead of the gate being an illusion 
opening into a different world, this is 
an illusion reflecting everything 
around it boats, water, flats, sky. 

The gentle humour becomes whimsy 
in another work called Dragon's Song 
in which more writhing tape of the 
shining steel dragon juggles a disc of 
the sun between its head and tail. 
Meanwhile, tucked away in a cobbled 
comer, is Universe and Lif&. a classic 
Yang piece in which the curves, 
columns and discs represent a galactic 
city inhabited not by people but by 
stars. 

Philomena Davidson Davis, of the 
Sculpture Company (the commercial 
arm of the RSBS). says: “Western 
lovers of sculpture will have to take 
their time to get to know the work. It is 
sculpture of great integrity. Other 
Chinese sculptors have found it diffi¬ 
cult to break through into the Western 
market. Yuyu Yang was a natural 
choice as our first International Fellow, 
representing the largest living civilisa¬ 
tion, its history, growth and culture." 

Examples of Yang’s works are all 
over Taiwan: in banks, offices, hotels, 
golf courses and universities as well as 
his own Lifescape Museum in the 
capital Taipeh. Among Chinese sculp¬ 
tors using steel he is the undisputed 
pioneer. He started using it as early as 
1961. Why? 

“1 strive for simplicity and purity," 
he says. “Stainless steel is the perfect 
material. It captures its surroundings 
in reflection and incorporates the 
world into it Art and the environment 
merge instead of competing. But what 
impresses me most about stainless 
steel is that it has inherited, as it were, 
the exquisite brightness of china wares 
of the Sung dynasty." 

Yang's sculpture is on display in 
Chelsea Harbour (London SW10) until 
November. His pieces are for sale but 
they do not come cheaply. Prices range 
from £66,000 to more than £400.000. 
Perhaps exhibition sponsors such as 
P&O or the Chinese-language satellite 
channel CNE will be tempted. 


Shah 



FROM FRIDAY AUGUST 16 

AND AT SELECTED 
CINEMAS ACROSS 
THE COUNTRY 

”3Kg3S [Steers 


HAYMARKETl KENSINGTON I SWISS COTTAGE 
0171 £39 76S7 I 0171 371 3166 ■ 0171 722 5905 


IJQL 0508.10 045 7IS.B 4S.ldBFflaStfl2.l5 fl.40145 HfcStf 11 35 



1^4.10 7 05.835 



w: pt a 











































32 


TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 15TC96 


£ 



■ CHOICE 1 

Scott Joplin’s rags 
come to Edinburgh 
in the expert hands 
of Joshua Rifkin 

VENUE: Tonighr at the 
Queen’s Hall 



■ CHOICE 2 

Roy Orbison is 
celebrated in a 
touring production 
of Only the Lonely 

VENUE: This week at the 
Theatre Royal. Brighton 


THE’ 


sTIMES 


ARTS 



■ NEW VIDEOS 

A Frances Hodgson 
Burnett story 
is beguilingly 
adapted for the 
screen in A 
Little Princess 



N EW CDS 

... and the 
75th birthday 
of composer 
Malcolm Arnold 
is marked with 
a fine new disc 


EDINBURGH 

Accompanied by Malcokn Mariireau ai 
puna, the Welsh baritone Bryn 
TerMpartwms a eet-oUl concert al 
the Usher HaD (7 30pm). afthougn 
returns are always a posifakly A! [he 
sama )10 3Qpoi). EmM) Pnndnoo 
conducts ihe 06C Scotrsh Symphony 
Orcheyra m me Bnlrfri debut 
perfonranco al Rut by Emmanuel 
Nunes, me Ljoer being [he subjea c4 a 
reett wel tnstghts ieduro al [be 
Edroburgh Paginal TVeatre (5pm). 

Ow at the Queen's Hal. the planes 
AHda do LnrTocha Miami presents a 
pnxy a nma oi Spaneh mawc. 
including works by Mamppj and de 
FaJa Ai me Edinburgh Playhouse 
{7 30pm. and tomorrow), tha 
Nederfands Dane* Theater prasenis 
me second ol two prexyammes. 
featimg tfie spiritual Whereabouts 
UrSuTOwn and the corevc Invan lion ol Sa 
Dances Al SI Cuthberf s Church (oprol. 
uis Emperor String Quartet mates the 
first ol trtree appearances inaxt on Aug 
23 and 2*1 in the Haydn stung quartet 
senes at concerts 

Festival box afltee (0131-225 5756 fcx 
betels and information) 

On the Fringe, the CaSlormar company 
Joy of Dancing (USA) presents a high- 
powered mu oi jazz, tsp and uaflei 
[Youth liuemationa) al Si Oswald's Hefl 
7.30pm; to Sat). Over at the Central Hall 
1 7 30pm). Dean Marshas conducts iho 
Calgary FUcflon tn a blend ot Gallic, 
country, [azz and Capm musical styles 
In Si Caci®'-, HaS [3pmi. John 
Kitchen harpjchord, plays 18th- 


TODAY’S CHOICE 


A daily guide to arts 

and entertainment 

compiled by Gillian Maxey 


century French muse, while the master 
ot ragtime piano Joshua RtfMn ploys 
Scon Joplin standards a the Queen's 
HaS \7 30pm) Common Grounds [9pm. 
to Aug 241 £ the venue lor A Touch al 
the Poe. a haunting portrait a) Edgar 
Allan Poe by hewn Mdche* Martin 

Fringe box office inquiries 0131-2E6 
5257, tickers 0131 -226 51301 

LONDON 

BBC PROMS 96. The Royal Liverpool 
PttfBtarmonlc gives Ihe frst ol two 
conccris (7pm) tier FeSe*' leads [he 
orchestra n inodemal muse irom 
JaiS'SeS s SchhicL una jju Usd's 
Piano Concerto No 1 tsdoet Artur 
Ftranol and Bwtoz's levered 
Symphorw lamAibquc Ai 10pm. Martyn 
Brabbms conducts the Nash Ensemble 
in music by Milhaud. Fata and Memcn 
Bowen's arrangement ol songs tr/ 
Gerhard [Rosa Mamon. soprano) 
T*en.v-Three Frames tor Four Havers. 
a Nash commission by Cob) Mathews, 
completes the programme 
Albert Hull. Kertssrqtor Gore. SW7 
{0171-589 9212) 

LOVE IN A WOOD London Clasnc 
ItuVie Co provides me annual 
Restoration comedy at Itvs venue 


Wycherley's firsi success irrtngue. 
matchmaking. characters celled 
Addtepol and Dappenmt. unperformed 
n Loocton tor 300 years. 

Hew End. 27 few End. Hampstead. 
NWS (0171-794 0022). Opens taught. 

7 JJpm. Then Tue-Sat, 7 30prn mat 
Sun. 4 Jiipm Until Sep 8 

ELSEWHERE 

BRIGHTON BiH KomnigW and Kerth 
Stijdran died the skdc West Ena 
production otThe Roy Orbiaan Story 
— Only the Lonely, feetutng hit tunes 
such as FYeKytVOrran and ft's Over. 
Theatre Royal (01273 328488) Mrw 
Thurv 7 45pm. Frr and Sat. 530pm and 
830 pm Until Aug 24. 

BUXTON The Brussels C^era 
CorrxMnv stages The Pintles et 
Penzance at this year's toKmaOonal 
Giber andS»*van Festival. 

Buxton Open House, water Street 
(01298 721901 Tonight 730pm 

LONDON GAI 1 FRIES 

Design Museum 100 Masterpieces, 
lumiure that made Ihe 20 [h Century 
[0171-378 6055) . Museum of the 
Moving Imago- Image-In Vbwnsot 
Future Images (0171-8)5 1350) 
National GaDary Degas (0171-747 
2885j. National Portrait Gatlery- 
AssembSng the Fanxty (0171 -306 00551 
The P botoga phera - Gagery Larry 
Clark-Kids (0171-831 17721 Royal 
Academy Summer Exfitafion (0171- 
439 74381 Serpentina Rtchwd 
Witon Jarrrrmg Gears (Q171-402 90751 
Tate Leon Kossafl (0171-8878000) 


■ BIRDY- Wiliam Wharton's best- 
seflrig nquei wheni a schizophrenic 
longs for freedom. oddly filmed but 
run adapted tor the stage by Naomi 
WaRace Kewn Knight directs Tarn 
W9ams and Adam Gaos 
Lyric Studio. King Street. 
Hammersmith. Wb (018 f-741 £311) 
Mon-SaL 8 pm. mal SaL 4 30pm. Urrtd 
Augus! 17 

kJ BY JEEVES Defaghdul musical 
creation by Alan Ayckbourn and Andrew 
Lloyd Webber, based on the 
Wodehouse heroes' first attempted 20 
years ago, non entirely revised. 

Duke of York's. St Marin's Lane. W7 
10171-836 5122) Mon-Sal, 7 45pm. 
mats Wed and Sa: 3pm @ 

D DIAL **M” FOR MURDER Feler 
□arson and Catherine Rabet) in 
Fiedejck Kpob's classically ingenious 
thnBer. delng 6 cm the days before the 
aft-rjiqu ptwre number 
Apollo, Shafiesbur/ Avenue. W1 
(0171-494 5070) MorvFn 8 pm bar 
a 1 Sprit: rrais Tnurs. 3pm. Sal. 5pm 

G ELVIS- Sctm?d revmol ol the 20- 
year-oto tribute show PJ Ptoby plays 
[he Vegas Eivis and Tim WWnafl plays 
the Pelvis m his peme PosilrreFy no 
omph-iis on the tote-night gorging on 
fear'll 5 j.T?> a.nd *. 3*3 torpedoes 
Prince ol Wales Coventry S«eet Wl 
t017J -829 5972; fAyi-Thurs. 8 pm- Fn 
and Sot s 30 znd 8 3 &pm 

□ FERRY 'CROSS THE MERSEY 

Gerry artf the Paserrvd-^s. snqmg the 
story ol yes -jen-y and to* 

Pacemai-ws. who rjd the* first No 1 hv 
one month belore the Beattei 
Lyric. Shahcsbury Avenue. Wl 10171- 


THEATRE GUIDE 


Jeremy Kingston's assessment 
ot -theatre showing In London 
■ House full, returns only 
B Some seals avadobla 
□ Seals at ad prices 


49 * 5045) Morv-Fit. 8pm. '2>al 8 'Spin; 
mas Wed. 3cm. Sal 5pm Until Sept 7 

□ HEDDA GABLER Alexandra 
GJbrcuth's aoctacned penormance in 
Stephen Urawn's producoxi lor English 
Touring Theaira 

Donmar Warehouse. Eartnam Sheet 
V/C2 (0171-369 17321 MonSal.^xn 
mats Thurs and Sat. 4pm Unlit Aug 31 

OTOE LIGHTS HOKvdKorder's 
drams ert a iwimey through rhe New 
York oghrmare End-vwtti ihe casi 
attacking tfic deahe. fitfingty because 
ai me end of Ihe run the intiyior «dl to 
rebu.it 

Royal Court Stomc Square. SW1 
(0)71-7501745) tAon-Sa; 7.30Dtn.mai 
Sat 3 20pm Until August 31 

□ MARTIN GUERRE The lajosi 
Bouoni--Schci"fleig musvai brings banal 
lyrics :o a coreusmerfy i.jto ijJe 
Prince Edward. CSd C.^mpton SI. Wl 
(0171-43754301 Msn-SaL 7 45pm. 
mats Thjs and Sal 3pm 

□ ROMEO AND JULIET Lucy 
Wh- r Tjtpn'i JuLei is one- ol me belter 
ffucgs ir. Adnan Noble s so-so 
produstron h'jm List year's Stratiord 


Barbican. S3k Street EC2 (0171-630 
88911 Tcnigiit. 7.15pm: mat. 2pm. In 
rep IS 

□ A SMALL WORLD htreresong 
Mustaphs Matura play uncovering the 
secrets behind Die meeftng al tvro 
Tnradatians m a BrooMyn tar 
Southwark Playhouse. 62 Southwark 
Bridge Rd. SEl (D171-B20 3494).Tue- 
SaL 8pm UnU Aug 24 

■ STANLEY Interesting Pam Gems 
plav. win An lorry Sher a persuasive 
Slantoy Spencer, xtsptfed by CooWtam, 
b-xibfci by wives. 

National iCottssloel, South Bank, SEl 
[0171-92B 2252) Last performances 
tonignt -Sai. 7 30pm: mat. SaL 230pm 

□ TWO BOYS IN A BED ON A COLD 
WINTER'S NIGHT James Edward 
Barker's ptov -about iho dynanxes ol the 
one-nighi stand honest and sexy 
Arts. Giea Neviport SL WC2 (0171- 
836 3334) Mon-Thurs. 8pm. Frt and SaL 
7pm and 9pm Unrt September 7 

LONG RUNNERS 

Beats New London |0171 -105 0072) 

□ Don't Dross lor Dinner Duchess 

(0171-494 5070) E Grease 
Dommon 10171-41600601 ■ Las 

Ms&rablea Palace lOI 71-434 0909| 
Buisa Saigon Drury Lane 10171-494 
5400i □ The Mousetrap 

St Martin's 10171^36 14431 . ■The 
Pha ntom of the Opera Her Majesty's 
(0171-494 5400).. BSunset 
Boulevard Adefph (0171-344 0055) 

□ The Woman In Black. Fortune 
10171-836 2238) 

Ticket rtorrofton supplied by Society 
ot London Theatre. 


NEW RELEASES 


AUGUST (PGj Awkward film ol Unde 
Vanya iransterred lo Wales n the late 
19th camirv. (fceded by. and uamng. 
Anthony Hopkins With Ledm Phiftips 
and K-ate Burton 

Curzon Mayfair (0171 363 17201 
Renoir 10171-837 84021 fflehmond 
10181-322 0030) 

♦ INDEPENDENCE DAY M2j- Mens 
nrjacte America's >jos n Dxs o<Jsm 
popcorn toast starring Jell Goldblum, 
wn South and Bui Fuitman 

ABC Tottenham Court Road [0171 
636 6148) B ar bic a n (0171-638 0891 1 
Ctapham Picture House (0171 -498 
3323) Notfing HU Coronet 10171727 
6705) Odeans Kensington (01426- 
914 666) Leicester Sqtrare (01426916 
683| Mariile Arch (01426 914 501) 
Swiss Cottage (0171-586 3057) Rio 
(0171-254 6677) Rttzy [0171-737 2121) 
Screen on Baker Street (0171 -935 
27721 Screen on the Green (0171-226 
3520) UO Mb—l eys <0171-792 3332) 
Write Chelace (0171 -352 5090) 
Ftdhem Hoad 10171-370 2636) 

THE SECRET OF ROAN INISH (PGi 
Wonderful Celtic loft late with a reairstlc 
slant, by wrtor-ffiredor JcJwi Saytes 
ABC Panun Street (0171-S30 06311 
rtipham Ptcbee House (0171-498 
3323) Virgin Haymartet [0171-839 
1527) Warner West End (0171 -437 
4343) 

♦ TOE STUPIDS (PG) Mrthtess 
comedy about America's stopKtest 
lamdy With Tom Amok) and Jessica 
Lundy Director. John Landis. 

Odeans: Kensington (01426 9148661 
Swiss Cottage (01426 914098) West 
End (01426-915 574) 


CINEMA GUIDE 


Geoff Brown's asse ssm ent of 
films In London and (where 
Indicated with the symbol ♦) 
on release across the country 


CURRENT 

♦ FUPl-’teH (PG) A surly teenager 
reLBRs with a doipixn Unmagi native 
lamly Mm. with Elijah Wcx>3 and Paul 
Hogan Dreciw. Alan'Shapiro. 

MGM TrocaderoS (0171-434 0031) 
Odeon Swiss Cottage (Q1436 914 0981 
Plea (0990 888990i UCI WMteteys 
© (<3990 88S 990) Virgin Fulham Road 
[0171-370 2636) Warner Q10171-437 
4343) 

♦ TOE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE 
DAME (U) Victor Hugo meets Iho 
Disney aninvN.ars. A pervorw. arid 
pewersoty successful mot o( the cuckfly 
anddtwnteaJ 

Barbican (S10171-638 8891) MGMs: 
Baker Street 10171-935 977?) 
Trocadero 0(0171-434 0031] 

Odeons: Kensington (01426 914668) 
Mezzanine 0(01426 915683) Swiss 
Cottage (01426 914 098) Rio pH 71-254 
66771 «tw(0171 -7372121) UCI 
WMteteys 0 (0990 888990) Virgin 
Chalsaa (017l-352 5090) W*t>er© 
(0171-437 434J) 

♦ JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH 

(U). Mistreated James finds Ns tool in a 
peach voyagrag across the AUartic. 
Excekrtanxnaled version oiRoald 
Dahl's book. Director. Herxy Seix*. 


Ctepham Picture House (0171 -498 
3323) fid* (0171 -727 4D431 Odeons 
Kensington (01426-914 666) Swiss 
Cottage (Cl 71 -506 3057) West End 
(01426-915 574) Phoenix (0181-883 
2233) Ritzy (0171-73721211 
Scroen/Baker Street (0171 -935 2772) 
UaWhlteteys (0171-792 3332) Virgin 
Chelsea (0171 3525096) 

♦ NRIPPET TREASURE ISLAND (U) 

Ketirnt and Miss Ffiggy xivada 
Stevenson s classic JoSy addition la 
the Muppet mijve saga, with Tm i>ny 
Director. Brian Hanson 
Watermans [0181 -568 1176) 

♦ THE ROCK (18). BeUrgercm actroo 
movie set on Alcafimi wlih Nxxilas 
Cage. Seer Connery and Ed Hams 
Dbedor. IbchaelBay 
MGHTrocadere0 [0171-434 0031) 
Odeons: Kensington ID1426 914666) 
Uozzairtne® 101428915683) UCI 
Whiteleys 0(0990 888 990) Vlrgbi 
Chetece (0171 -352 50961 Watermans 
(0181-5681176) 

THE TTT AID TOE MOON [18)r The 
s exud developmenl ol a rone-yea/-old 
boy Unexpected magic Irom Catalan 
director Bxjas Luna 
HGH PteeadIHy 10171-437 3561) 

♦ THE TRUTH ABOUT CATS AND 
DOGS 115). Pleasant romantic: con»*fy 
about mrsULan KJemtty. with Janeare 
Garolalo. Uma Thutnun and Ben 
Chap&i Oroaor. Michael Lonmann 
ABC Tettenttem Court Rood (0171- ' 
6366l48)OdeonKenstegton(01426- 
914 666) Rttry (0171-7372121) 
Screen/HII ® (0171-435 33W) UCI 
WMHeys 0 [0990 888990} Vbgte 
Fulhwn Road 10171-3702636) Wa 
(0171 -437 4343) 


Unsweetened family fare 


■ A LITTLE PRINCESS 
Warner . U. 1995 

A GORGEOUS family film that even 
improves on The Secret Garden, 
another Frances Hodgson Burnett 
novel recently remade for the screen. 
The reworked story tells of an English 
officer's daughter left in a New York 
boarding school while he fights in the 
First World War. Mexican director. 
Alfonso Cuarbn shows uncommon 
mastery of the Hollywood machine, 
and his players, none starry names, 
never succumb to saccharine sweet¬ 
ness or heavy caricature. Liesel Mat¬ 
thews is the girl plunged from riches to 
rags and Eleanor Bran the malevolent 
headmistress who tries to outlaw 
make-believe. Available to rent. 

■ THE PEBBLE AND THE 
PENGUIN 

Warner, U, J995 

WHEN did you last see a penguin with 
a waist, or indeed with a hat and scarf? 
But why be mean to this little animated 
film from the pen of former Disney 
artist Don Bluth? h aims at no heights, 
and reaches none. It plumps for sap 
and delivers, from Barry ManiloWs 
songs to file narrator’s wrap-up: 
“Goodness glaciers, they lived happily 
ever after". Young children will be 
entertained. Available to rent. 

■ SMITHEREENS 

Arrow. 15, 1982 

SUSAN Seidelman’s directorial career 
got off to a fine start with this generally 
light-hearted portrait of New York's 
punks and drifters, perilously surviv¬ 
ing in a world of gaudy graffiti, low 
morals and high decibels. The heroine 
is a New Jersey lass with no money 
and a decreasing circle of spongeable 
friends. Susan Berman makes the 
potentially tiresome creature appeal¬ 
ingly vulnerable. 

■ MAN OF ARAN 
VC/. PG, 1934 

DOCUMENTARY poet Robert 
Flaherty's unique liaison with Britain's 



First day al school- Liam Cunningham. Liesel Matthews, Eleanor Bran and Lomax Study in A Little Princess 


commercial film industry caused 
many financial headaches: Flaherty 
roamed over the .Aran islands, off the 
Galway coast, with scant regard for 
budgets and film stock. The battles 
were worth it. 

Hard realism was never Flaherty's 
line, but the film works wonderfully as 
a romantic treatment of man against 
nature, with a splendid cast of locals. 


seaweed, sharks, potatoes and storm- 
tossed seas. 

■ WHEN SATURDAY COMES 

Fox Guild. 15. 1995 
ANTEDILUVIAN British tale of a 
brewery worker who longs for a 
professional footballer's career. He 
gets a trial with Sheffield United but 
the old workins-class demons haunt 


him: drink, family violence, a pregnant 
girlfriend. 

Can our lad pull himself together? 
And do we care? Not much, though 
Sean Bean. Emily Lloyd and Pfe& 
Postlethwaite endow the film with 
more spirit than it deserves. Directed 
by Maria Giese. Available to rent 

Geoff Brown 


NEW CLASSICAL CDs: Lehar looks east; a double dose of Schumann; Arnold on Conifer 


OPERETTA 


John Higgins 


■ LEHAR 

The Land of Smiles 

The Czarevitch 

Gustafson/Hadley 

English Chamber Orch/ 

Bonynge 

Telarc 80419** 80395** 
TWO bold attempts to per¬ 
form in English something by 
Lehir other than The Merry 
Widow. In both operettas the 
composer stuck to a successful 
formula: an exotic setting for 
two of three acts (Peking for 
Smiles and St Petersburg for 
Czarevitch), luscious melodies 
for the lead tenor and soprano, 
zippy ones for the support 
comedy pair, a thunderingly 
operatic finale to Act II and, 
more suprisingly. a melan¬ 
cholic close. In each the tenor 
rejects love for the burdens of 
the state of China and Russia 
respectively, with much 
"local” music along the way. 

Both were written for 


Tauber and Jerry Hadley is a 
worthy successor. Apart front 
an occasional coo. he has the 
easiest or ways with lehar's 
whipped-cream songs and his 
diction is perfect. The Czare¬ 
vitch found less favour with 
the public — and with Tauber 
— than Smiles, but Hadley 
reminds us just how reward¬ 
ing is the title role of the 
misogynist Czarevitch. 

The ballet dancer Sonia 
even has to dress as a Circas¬ 
sian officer to gain his atten¬ 
tions. Nancy Gustafson has 
the measure of the music and 
more, but her words arc 
virtually devoid of conso¬ 
nants. She is better in Smiles. 
for which Hadley has provid¬ 
ed the English version, just as 
singable as one would expect 
from a singer- The supporting 
duo is only so-so. 

The real stars are the ECO 
and Richard Bonynge. The 
violins swoon and, in The 
Czarevitch, the mandolins 
and balalaika throb away. 
Nothing is more exotic than 
Vienna’s view of the world 
beyond Budapest. 


VOCAL 


Hilary Finch 


■ SCHUMANN. Clara 
& Robert 

The Heart of the Poet 

Skovhus/Deutsch 
Sony SK 62372*** 

THE artistic relationship be¬ 
tween Robert Schumann and 
his wife, the pianist and 
composer Clara Wieck. is still 
being gleefully teased out by- 
biographer and musicologist 
alike. Did he encourage her io 
compose because her piano¬ 
playing disturbed his own 
composition? Were her pro¬ 
tests the cries of a frustrated 
performer or the murmurs of 
an undernurtured self- 
confidence? 

For once, the songs of the 
happy pair are placed side by- 
side and the fluency and 
emotional ardour of Clara's 
writing, albeit less daring in 
its tussle with prosody, is 
captured exactly in Bo 
Skovhus’s way of singing out 


their melodies freely and 
unselfconsciously. 

The other raison d'etre of 
this enterprising disc is to 
present the young Danish 
baritone’s first recording of 
Robert Schumann’s Op 24 
Liederkreis and Dichteriiebe. 
The early Heine settings, with 
their oblique glimpses of pass¬ 
ing moods, are never weighed 
down by over-dose verbal 
focus. Both here and in his 
cumulatively persuasive 
Dichteriiebe, Skovhus and his 
perceptive pianist Helmut 
Deutsch search out the unique 
quality of movement in each 
song and use it a as prime 
expressive mover. 


ORCHESTRAL 


Barry Millington 

■ ARNOLD 
Symphonies Nos I & 5 
RPO/ Hand ley 
Conifer 75605 51257 2** 
THE imminent 75th birthday 
of Sir Malcolm Arnold in 


October has already occa¬ 
sioned a flurry of recording 
activity. Complete cycles of the 
nine symphonies are under 
way from three companies 
(Conifer. Chandos and Naxos) 
and certainly these works are 
weighty enough to sustain 
contrasting interpretations. 

Conifer’s set is in the experi¬ 
enced, sympathetic hands of 
Vernon Handley, and the 
latest instalment offers the 
First Symphony of the confi¬ 
dent 28-year-old composer, 
alongside the powerful but 
perplexing Fifth. This would 
be an eminently recommend- 
able disc were it not for the. 
appearance last year of Rich¬ 
ard Hickox’s superior reading 
of the Fifth (coupled with the 
Sixth) on Chandos. The more 
generous spread of sound on 
the Chandos recording adds 
bite to the savage outbursts in 
which Arnold revels, and en¬ 
hances the grand Mahlerian 
rhetoric 

* Worth hearing 
** Worth considering 
*** Worth buying 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


ART GALLERIES 


INTERNATIONAL ART 

SUMMER 1996 
Appel Lowndes 

Bombers LS. Lowry 

Colder M. Newcomb 

Dubuffet Henry Moore 

Foncma MirtS 

Laden Freud B- Nicholson 

Ceore Grosz W. Nicholson 

S. Hayicr Noide 

B. Hepwonh M. Snath 

H. Hofmann Rukfcm Spear 

Jawlensky T. Sixmos 

Cebu Lagar Sutherland 

Lanskoy Vuillard 

Legcr Alfred Wallis 

CRANE KALMAN 
CALLERY 

178 Branpiaa Road. Londn*. 

SW31HQ 
Td: 0171-584 7566 
Daily IO*. Sal I0J 


DANCE 


COLISEUM 0171 6328300 

Tues 20 lo Si 24 Augua a 7 30 

BARYSHNIKOV 

Productkra 

WHITE OftKPWCE PROJECT 


To advertise in this 
section please call 
the Entertainments 
Team on 

0171 680 6222 

or fax 

01714819313 


OPERA & BALLET 


GtynWMon Festival Opera 
■dh The Lender Rtemw: 
tongft Sa 17. Ties 20 a i55pm 
Ermtone, Fii 16. Mon IS a 5pm 
Sun 18 a 415pm Arabetta. 
Fix possfcte refined ndets cM 
_ 01273 813813 


Toadmtcein 
ENTERTAAMBITS 
Tef 0171 6806222 
a tax: 01714818313 


THEATRES 


ADBLPHI 

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SUNSET 

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Weiner of 7 Tony Awards 
tartudfeig 

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Samj 

POULA CLARK 
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CALL 0171344 0056 (bkg lee) 
GRP BOOKING 413 3302 (t*g fee) 
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Andrew Uoyd Webber's 

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Whte tax** runs 19.45 <My 
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“BREATHTAKING" Independeri 
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emeus 

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You're more than a menfcer of the 
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THE TIMES THl n>crw«, _ 

~-- 15 ]9% 

■_EDINBUr^ 

The artistry 

°f Miranda 




rJrpy 


■ EDINBURGH 

... but the 
Mark Morris 
Dance Group 
returns with 
a fine mixed 
programme 



■ PROMS 

Esa-Pekka Salonen 
conducts the 
Philharmonia as 
Barry TuckweU 
plays his swansong 
on the horn 



■ TOMORROW 

Barely a 
teenager, the 
remarkable LeAnn 
Rimes has taken 
die country-music 
world by storm 


^ __ 

W hat was the phys- 
‘ral appearance 
the Elsinore 
that Robert 
wpage bad created for his 

of the “me 
rame? Visitors to the Edin¬ 
burgh Festival will never 
Jcnow, for the show was finally 
abortoi late on Tuesday, vii 
flrn of someone's inability to 
tansp^e a working set to the 
King s Theatre stage. But ru¬ 
mour suggests that Claudius’s 
palace was a son of sci-fi 
amusement arcade with com¬ 
puters. holograms, strobe 
bghts and. for all I know, 
Rosen crantz and Guildenstem 
Hying in from Wittenberg bv 
saucer. ■ 

t At all events, it was dearly a 
more elaborate than the set 
which the American avant- 
garde artist Robert Wilson has 
designed for his filleted ver¬ 
sion of Virginia Woolfs Or- 
Lindo. It was also. 1 suspect, a 
lot more visually exciting. 

There were many times at 
the Lyceum when I felt that if I 
shut my eyes and simply 
listened to Miranda Richard¬ 
son reciting Woolfs tale of 
androgyny in high places, I 
would not be missing any¬ 
thing important. Indeed, there 
were moments when my eyes 
were shut for me, because the 
stage lights were turned off 
and that cool, musical voice 
went punctiliously on. describ¬ 
ing yet another event in the 
400-year-old life of the Elizabe¬ 
than nobleman who became a 
woman in the 17th century and 
was never again sure that 
gender was a straightforward 
leaner. 

Certainly, Wilson's set has 


EDINBURGH 

1 festival 

little to do with what Richard- 
son is trying to bring verbally 
jo life. She tells of gaudy 
balloons and multicoloured 
flames on the frozen Thames, 
of exotic horsemen and 
women with six-foot-high wigs 
in Constantinople Yet what 
we see is a rectangular 
backcloth which sometimes 
shrinks in size and changes in 
hue from white to blue, and 
the occasional dubiously rele¬ 
vant piece of furniture: a chest 
of drawers shaped like steps, a 
table with glass sea horses for 
supports, a tiny model door 
that opens and shuts, and 
what appear to be giant show¬ 
er-curtains. 

Stifl. Richardson is always 
on stage, and she looks as 
good as she sounds. Until 18th- 
century fashion allows it to 
flutter a bit, her flame-col¬ 
oured hair is swept right back, 
leaving her pale, chiselled face 
exposed to the cheekbones and 
beyond. 

The effect is severe yet 
sensual, as if a Botticelli angel 
had beat crossed with one of 
those stark loners you find in 
Becketts late plays. But she is 
isolated on the stage for more 
than two hours, and that is a 


_ yceum 

long time to spend staring at 
the finest portrait. 

This is a portrait which 
moves, of course. Dressed now 
in blue double! and hose, now 
in billowing bloomers, now in 
a long pink dress, she walks 
forwards, walks backwards, 
undulates, falls to the floor, 
rolls around, lies down, crawls 
on her knees, glides, skitters 
and more, much more. But her 
movements are often as little 
related to what she says as her 
intonations are to what she 
. feds. 

S he does not how! when 
she tells us she howls, 
or scream when you 
expect her to scream. 
And nothing seems to exercise 
her more than the fact that 
Queen Victoria wore lots of 
crinoline to conceal her 
pregnancy. 

Well. aU right, there is some 
reason for that It tells you 
why Woolf wrote the novel 
and, presumably, why Wilson 
adapted it Gender determines 
your soda! role without neces¬ 
sarily taking your identity 
along with it It is not easy for 
a woman to fight a duel or for 
a man to dance naked, al¬ 
though Richardson's Orlando 
managed it in the 28th century 
— or rather, tells us that she 
did. 

And there’s the trouble if 
we had bought Miranda Rich¬ 
ardson the audiobook, we 
would not have lost all that 
much. Wilson's Orlando is 
pretentious and visually mo¬ 
notonous — but at least it has 
happened, which is more than 
you can say for Lepage and his 
Elsinore. 



Miranda Richardson’s musical voice and sensual 
staging of Virginia Woolfs “tale of androgyny ir 


DONALD COOPEH 


siral voice and sensual presence were captivating enough for the audience, but American Robert Wilson’s minimalis t 
’s tale of androgyny In nigh places” during the 18th century offered virtually no thin g to relieve the visual monotony 



Commissioned for die Edinburgh Festival, Mark Morris’s f Don’t Want to Love disappoints 


T his is the fifth consecu¬ 
tive year that the Mark 
Moms Dance Group 
has been a feature of the 
Edinburgh Festival. Few are 
the companies that rate such 
an honour, fewer still those 
that could come back year 
after year without running out 
of creative steam. But Morris 
is a king of contemporary 
choreography and we have 
come to expect great things of 
him. And, for the most part, 
that’s what we get. 

Ironically, the weakest of the 
four works on offer here is the 
one commissioned by the Ed¬ 
inburgh Festival to celebrate 
its fiftieth year. / Don’t Want 
to Love (set to madrigals by 
Monteverdi, beautifully 
played and sung by the Con¬ 
certo ltaliano) is familiar Mor¬ 
ris terrain, with pretty boys 


New sweetness and light 
outshone by old glories 


and girls, let loose in the 
garden of love, only to find 
that rapture can be elusive. 
The choreography is imbued 
with felicity, its petit allegro as 
tight as whipped cream. But at 
times the decorative charms of 
the piece overwhelm its ar¬ 
dour and blunt its edge. 

No fear of self-parody in the 
remarkable World Power, 
which Morris choreographed 
last year to music by Lou 
Harrison. The score was in¬ 
spired by Marie Twain'S writ¬ 
ings on colonial domination in 
the Philippine war. and Harri- 


DAftfCE 

Mark Morris 
Festival Theatre, 
Edinburgh 


son uses a gam elan orchestra 
(the wonderful South Bank 
Gamelan Players in this in¬ 
stance) with harp and trum¬ 
pet while Morris takes his cue 
from the angularity of Eastern 
dance styles. The result is 


stunning. The first thing you 
notice is how quietly insistent 
are the rhythms, dainty footed 
but determined. Their repeti¬ 
tion grows into a statement as 
the 14 dancers turn percussive 
grace into shouts of self- 
validation from the oppressed. 
One of Morris’S strengths is to 
find an apt movement or 
gesture and then repeat it until 
jt becomes etched in our 
conscience, like a slogan. With 
a simple, well-timed stamp of 
each bare foot. Moms here 
does it again. 

In any other choreographer 


(with the exception, perhaps, 
of Merce Cunningham), the 
decision to set 40 minutes of 
dance to silence might seem 
arrogant But in his 1990 piece. 
Behemoth. Morris experi¬ 
mented with the absolute of 
body language, the ritual of a 
dancer's physical experience. 
Indeed. Behemoth could be 
Morris’s homage to Cunning¬ 
ham. 

Lest we forget that Morris 
himself was born to dance, we 
have Ten Suggestions, his 1981 
solo. Set to Tcherepnin’s Baga¬ 
telles (piano. Linda Dowdell) 
this is a series of ironic 
autobiographical vignettes. 
No one else could indulge in 
such outrageous self-admira¬ 
tion and still make us see the 
raison d’etre of dance. 

Debra Craine 


CONCERTS: Barry Tuckwell signs off as a soloist at the Proms; early music on the South Bank 


HI 


AN EXCLUSIVE TIMES READER PROMOTION 


WITH his horn held high, 
Barrv Tuckwell took his leave 
of the London concert plat¬ 
form at the Proms on Tuesday. 
As a hom player, that is: he 
will doubtless be back before 
long with baton in hand as he 
continues Ids flourishing sec¬ 
ond career. 

Tuckw eU made his Proms 
debut 35 years ago with Mo¬ 
zart's Third Horn Concerto. 
And it was with this work that 
he signed off. giving a perfor¬ 
mance of gently underplayed 
virtuosity, its slow movement 
a characteristically warmly 
breadied aria, its ’ hunting" 
finale buoyant with that non¬ 
chalant and debonair robust¬ 
ness so typical of Tuckwell’s 
playing. 

It was Tuckwell"s distinc¬ 
tively lyrical high-register 
playing, though, which in¬ 
spired'Oliver Knussen in the 
Hom Concerto dedicated to 
him and given its London 
premiere on Tuesday. Knu*‘ 
sen delights in telling tales Ol 
when Tuckwell lived upstairs 
in their spare room in his 
childhood, and made the pre¬ 
cocious young Oily a hom out 
of papier-mad^- It certainly 
paid dividends, for Knussen s 


Last of 
a hom 
of plenty 

Philharmonia/ 

Salonen 

Albert Hall/Radio 3 


deep low for and understand¬ 
ing of the instrument has 
created a single-movement 
work of exquisitely imagined 
ideas, freedom and fluency of 
expression. 

At its British premiere at the 
Aldeburgh Festival fasryearji 
was the spirit of Mahler which 
seemed to haunt the 
lous, rustling soundworid of 
tiny figures flicked from wind 
to percussion to strings in the 
opening Intrada and ensuing 
Fantastico. This was the hom 
echoing long and far from the 
world of Waldeinsamkeit - 
the solitude in the woods of 


German nature Romanticism. 
Hearing the concerto now in 
the wider spaces of the Albert 
Hall. 1 was struck by the 
powerful, almost Scriabin- 
esque darkness of the ghostly 
variations on a ground bass in 
its slower section. 

Knussen has also spoken of 
Siegfried's Funeral March as 
a source of “strength" while 
writing this work: but it is the 
horn that remains hero. 

Esa-Pekka Salonen and the 
Philharmonia presented a 
particularly sensitive and sat¬ 
isfying context for the two 
hom concertos, prefacing the 
Knussen with Stravinsky's 
Symphonies of Wind Instru¬ 
ments, and following the Mo¬ 
zart with Sibelius's trombone- 
charged. single-movement 
Seventh Symphony. This was 
given a characteristically lean, 
lurid performance under 
Salonen's baton, as were De¬ 
bussy’s Nocturnes: their 
nuages luminous as layers of 
instrumental recession were 
defined: and their fites de¬ 
lighting in the score’s over- 
shifting spaces and dancing 
distances. 

Hilary Finch 


Grab an early night The Romans revealed 


NOW that the Proms are in 
full swing at the Albert Hall. 
August is something of a 
fallow period for classical 
music at the South Bank 
Centre. A week-long early 
music festival there would 
seem to be just the job, since 
many of the concerts in Philip 
Pickett's programme are of the 
small-scale character inappro¬ 
priate to the Albert Hall. 

The festival opened at the 
Queen Elizabeth Hall with a 
programme of 17th-century 
English music performed by 
the Musicians of the Globe. A 
number of settings of songs by 
Shakespeare were included in 
the concert, together with 
music for broken consort by 
Thomas Morley and pieces of 
various kinds based on popu¬ 
lar melodies. 

Somehow the programme 
did not hang together as well 
in performance as it did cm 
paper. The nature of the hall, 
lacking the intimacy of the 
Purcell Room, did not help, 
making it hard for the players, 
for all their technical accom¬ 
plishment. to project the sense 


Musicians of the 
Globe 

Queen Elizabeth Hall 


of spontaneity that can bring 
this music alive. 

The two singers managed to 
communicate better with the 
audience. The young baritone 
Roderick Williams has a 
pleasant, light voice and a 
sharp musical intelligence, es¬ 
pecially apparent in his rendi¬ 
tion of Robert Jones’s lute song 
Farewell Dear Love, and Cath¬ 
erine Bott gave a strongly 
characterised performance of 
Mother Watkin's Ale. an ac¬ 
count all the more commend¬ 
able as she was suffering from 
a chest infection. But it was 
the keyboard-player, Gary 
Cooper, who quietly stole the 
show: his account on the 
virginals of Giles Famaby’s 
Loath to Depart was quite 
masterly in execution and 
pacing. 

Tess Knighton 


jlidays are not the 
es on radio, with the 
real gems becoming 
rhis week has pro- 
led surprise and an 
ghr. 

r former is the 
the 8.40am slot on 
e vacated by politics. 
>rs The Changing 
a book about his 
e Forest of Dean, 
n odd. dark sort of 
the late Potter's life, 
ns the writing sign- 
to become a trade- 
TV plays, foil of 

nd tangential refer- 

sure this is 

out the readings by 
. is on the mark. 


Lords of the word 


The real gem of the -V; 4 .. T o AT) I ft 

week.however.came . v. 
from a most unex- , 

pected source: Test Match Special Gd\ 
(Radio 4 long wave). Each lunchtime of rJ 
the programme's producer, ftjter Eng 
Baxter, presents a cricket-related A 
mini-documentary or discussion, and the 
on Monday he put together a splendid to ft 
item. Nominally it was a tribute to Brai 
Alan McGflvray. the Australian com- Brai 
mentator who died last month, aged leg: 
85 But what emerged was a quite A 
extraordinary tale. He began com- becz 
men taring for the Australian Broad- two 
casting Corporation before the laste 
Second World War. In those days it radi 


... was impossible to 
; - " • broadcast live across 
continents, so Mc- 
Gilvray did ball-by-ball commentary 
of the 1938 series against Australia in 
England — from a Melbourne studio. 

As each ball was bowled, a man at 
the English venue would send a cable 
to Melbourne written in key words. 
Bradman, square, two would become: 
Bradman hits the ball through square 
leg and they take two. 

At first the system broke down, 
because McGilvray was taking only 
ftvo minutes to describe an over that 
lasted four minutes. Also, competing 
radio stations were not going to take 


ABC’S pioneering work lying down. If 
McGilvray gave the score as 118 for 
two, another station would announce 
that the score was 124 for two. But the 
rivals would be in a spot if a third 
batsman was out before the score 
actually readied 124. 

The fascination of McGilvray*s 
account of these early days is twofold. 
First, the stamina and resourceful¬ 
ness required to commentate all day 
on a cricket match taking place 15,000 
miles away makes playing in the 
match sound like a piece of rake. And 
secondly, his activities demonstrate 
that sports broadcasting was at the 
cutting edge of competitiveness long 
before the arrival of multiple tele¬ 
vision channels. 

Peter Barnard 


They were ruthless 
conquerers and 
sensitive builders 
but what was life 
really like for 
ordinary Romans? 

Through ordinary people's 
accounts of their mores, tastes 
and feuds, glimpses of forums 
amphitheatres and temples, 
descriptions of shops and vil¬ 
las. through Cicero. Seneca 
and Livy, Petronius. Caesar 
and Augustus, Professor 
Barry Cunliffe brings to life 
the mighty Roman Empire. 

Now The Times, with 
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Rome and Her Empire for 
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This 320-page book is far 
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34 BOOKS 


THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 


Jeanette Winterson on a heroine whose image transcends politics 

Still the stormy 
voice of France 


S he was bom in the 
village of Domretny 
on the borders of Lor¬ 
raine and Cham¬ 
pagne. She relieved Orleans 
against the English siege and 
stood at the side of the Dau¬ 
phin as he was crowned 
Charles VU at Rheims. She 
was captured, tried by the 
Inquisition, sold to the English 
and burnt as a heretic in 1431. 
In 1920 she was canonised as a 
saint 

Who was she? Joan of Arc. 
At once part of history and 
outside history. Well-known 
and unknowable, like Sappho 
or Elizabeth 1. she is bound 
into fact unbound as the stuff 
of legend. For more than 500 
years her story has served as a 
draw-well for artists, writers 
and musicians, including Ver¬ 
di, Rubens. Ingres, Twain, 
Sackville-West. Southey. 


JOAN OF ARC IN 
HER OWN WORDS 
Compiled and Edited by 
Willard Trask 

Turtlepoint Press. 18.99 
ISBN1885983085 

THE TRIAL OF JOAN 
OF ARC 

Introduced by Marina 
Warner 

Arthur James. £6.99 
ISBN 0853053545 


Shaw. In the 20th century, 
film-makers. (De Mille. Ros¬ 
sellini). and film stars 
(Bergman. Seberg. Lamarr), 
have used Joan as a fluid 
heroine for modem rimes. 

Joan the Maid, standard- 
bearer against the English, 
has become the rallying point 
for every possible political 
cause. Right and Left. She has 
been suffragist class militant 
apologist for Holy War, exem¬ 
plar of feminine virtue, and a 
poster pin-up for both the pro 
and anri-Fasdst lobbies dur¬ 
ing the Second World War. In 
her excellent introduction to 
The Trial of Joan of Arc, 
Marina Warner tells us that 
she was crossing the Tuileries 
Gardens in Pans in 1990 on 
Joan's feast day when a priest 
wearing Joan's badge ap¬ 
proached and asked for a 
donation. It turned out he was 
recruiting for Jean-Marie Le 
Pen. 

What can we learn from all 
of this? Joan's durability is not 
in doubt — but what of her 
integrity? If the clean-cut lines 
of her heroism can be so easily 
stencilled onto so many obses¬ 
sions. we find ourselves asking 
the same fundamental ques¬ 
tion as her tormentors at her 
trial: was Joan of Arc genuine? 

This is the Christ question. 
Those individuals whose char¬ 
acter, teachings or work fire 
keen debate generation to 


MARY EVANS 




titles etCeepitnetfitG 
pntfttottt fe6 coffgfrwflans 

A contemporary guise of Joan the Maid: woodcut from the Champion des dames 


generation, and long after the 
context of their endeavours 
has become obscure, have a 
peculiar effect on conscious¬ 
ness; anyone who engages, 
wen briefly, with their ideas, 
is soon forced to questions of 
authenticity; is this the real 
thing? 

This is uncomfortable. 
Much as we claim to desire it 
we live in terror of what is 
genuine, in case that steady 
clarity. however muddled in 
our hands, turns the question 
back on the questioner. “Is this 
genuine?" may become “How 
genuine am I?" 


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Unlettered Joan freed 70 
lawyers and divines in her 
cross-examination. Her great 
strength and her greatest 
weakness was her utter sincer¬ 
ity. Like Gandhi, like Picasso, 
she believed absolutely in her 
work. She had no ulterior 
motive, neither fame nor 
money, and there were many 
among her accusers who 
found her peptic honesty too 
much to stomach. If Joan was 
genuine it might follow that 
they were not The interests of 
Church and State could not be 
called to account by a cross¬ 
dressing peasant girl. 

The books under review 
here both use the manuscript 
sources of the trial and related 
material, but their aims are so 
different that they reveal, by 
comparison, how easy it is to 
use a text for one's own 
purposes while claiming it 
speaks for itself. This began to 
happen to Joan only 25 years 
after her death, when she was 
posthumously pronounced in¬ 
nocent and used as a standard 
of virtue by the very people 
who had condemned her. 

The Trial of Joan of Arc, 
primed up in an explicitly 
Christian series of visionary 
women, fixes Joan as a saint 
and martyr within a specific 
tradition. This is appropriate 
although there is much more 
to be said. 

Marina Warner’s subtle in¬ 
troduction frees Joan into oth¬ 
er possibilities, and it is 


Warner's earlier work. Joan of 
Arc: The Image of Female 
Heroism (1981) that has done 
so much to help us to under¬ 
stand both the cult of Joan and 
the strange nature of the 
super-myth. 

There is no myth without 
interpretation, and to pro¬ 
claim Joan of Arc. “in her own 
words" as Willard Trask tries 
to do, is absojute bosh. The 
trial manuscripts were not 
written by Joan, nor were her 
confessions to her Chaplain, 
and for us, at least whatever 
we read is in translation. 


I 


do not deny that Joan's 
voice can be heard in the 
trial documents. What 1 
do not accept is that there 
is any way for us to hear it 
unmediated. Trask's suppos¬ 
edly plain edition in fact turns 
the court account into a first 
person narrative, which it is 
not, rearranges the statements 
according to subject matter, 
footnotes nothing, and tells us 
that it has not been practicable 
to indicate omissions. The 
interested reader will be much 
better served by the rather 
quaint but scholarly 1956 
W. S. Scott translation offered 
in The Trial of Joan of Arc. 
Trask’s version, the Maid 
stripped bare, unarmoured by 
history or context might be 
seen as another incarnation in 
Joan’s endless rebirth, this 
time as the American 
soundbite. 



Going back to basics 


T here seems to be an insatiable 
demand for books about Richard 
Feynman, from a non-srientific 
readership fascinated by the fact that a 
great scientist can also be a human 
being, and from a scientifically literate 
readership awed by his achievements, 
bur hoping that somehow they might 
learn to be like the great man. Tire heart 
of this book — the “lost lecture" itself — 
is strictly for the cognoscenti. But it is 
accompanied by an historical introduc¬ 
tion and a charming reminiscence from 
David Goodstein, who was a colleague 
of Feynman's at the California Institute 
ofTechnology. which will also appeal to 
the broader canon of Feynman fans. 

The surprise, to anyone who knows 
that Feynman was a genius who helped 
to lay the foundations of modern 
quantum theory, is the subject matter of 
the lecture. It goes right back to the time 
of Newton and Kepler, and provides a 
proof, using only the mathematical 
techniques accessible to Newton's peers, 
that the elliptical orbits of the planets 
around the Sun result from the inverse 
square law of gravity. 

When Newton pre¬ 
sented his version of 
this proof to the Royal 
Society in the 1680s, it 
marked a watershed 
in science, establish¬ 
ing that the Universe 
at large obeys simple, 
universal mathemati¬ 
cal rules — the same 
rules apply to the fall 
of an apple from a 
tree, or foe orbit of a 
planet around the 
Sun. 

This is why the 
subject held such fas¬ 
cination for Feynman 
that he devoted a lec¬ 
ture to it, during the 
series of lectures he 
gave the undergradu¬ 
ates at Cal Tech in the 


J ohn Gribbin on 

a physicist’s 


enduring appeal 


human 
ven's symphonies 
plays. 


FEYNMAN’S LOST LECTURE 
The Morion of Planets 
Around the Sun 
By David L. Goodstein and 
Judith R. Goodstein 
Cape, * r «vW 
ISBN 0224 04&* 3 


eariy 1960s. Most of these lectures were 
gathered together and published as The 
Feynman Lectures on Physics, and are 
still in prim. But the historical aside on 
planetary orbits didn't fit that template, 
which is why it was put to one side and 
“lost" for 30 years. 



An engaging lecturer Feynman (left) with his students at Cal Tech, 1964 


of the law of 
“ one 

S^TOuming achievements ofjito 
or Michelangelo's Sisrine Cha- 

' „ nae js that It is not as 

f*" ■ , r -i u . lav person as any of 

^ not have To 

"HS 5 SET" enjoy music, a 
a a S^r a siSne 

Bui VOU do have to he at least 

s^s£strrssri 

^'StSsKvegonealongway 
towards making a ““S** P*** 
oeometry accessible to people who gave 
up maths as soon as the school 
allowed them to. By taking us step by 
step through the proof, they prorate 
insight into foe way sciennsts flunk.« 
vvelf as into the importance of this 
particular puzzle. It is a brave proeaf 
work, and even braver to mwrkd n nun a 
book aimed at foe general public. 

Without Feynman's 
name, it would have 
been impossible. To 
anyone with any in¬ 
terest at all in science, 
the result is fascinat¬ 
ing; whether it really 
will be intelligible to a 
wider audience is 
veiy bard to say. But I 
am delighted to see 
the book being mar¬ 
keted in this way, 
because the image of 
Feynman foe playboy 
scientist has tended to 
obscure the fact that 
he was a brilliant 
thinker and one of the 
finest scientists ever, 
not just of his genera¬ 
tion. This book will do 
much to restore the 
balance. 


CALTECH 


Vistas peopled by heroes 


I n a tent at Hrutafjordur in the 
summer of 1871, foe sleep of William 
Morris, his business partner Faulk¬ 
ner and his translator Magnus son is 
disturbed by a large figure looming at foe 
tent-flap and drunkenly bellowing: “I am 
(old off to watch your horsesrTaking foe 
hint. Moms pours “Wolf foe Unwashed" 
(as he dubs him) a slug of whisky and 
settles back to sleep. 

However: “Presently back he comes 
and says as if he were another person T*m 
told off to watch the horses!"* Morris 
obliges again, and. when he hears Wolf 
out in foe meadow, singing “a ballad in 
four-line stanza with a burden at each 
stanza’s end", he is at first charmed and 
honoured by this throwback to foe world 


Glyn Maxwell 


WILLIAM MORRIS 
Icelandic Journals 
With an Introduction by Magnus 
Magnnsson and a Preface fay Fiona 
MacCarfoy 
Mare's Nest. £15.99 
ISBN 0 900000120 


of the bardic heroes. But soon “it began to 
be a rather wearisome addition". When 
foe “dismal bellow" finally ends, “lo foe 
tent pulled (pen again, and there he is. 
asking us. as if he were yet a new person,: 
if he shall sing a littiesong to us". 

_ : HTZW1LLIAM MUSEUM. CAMBRIDGE . 



Dante Gabriel Rosetti’s drawing of Jane Morris in an Icelandic smock (1872) 


The Iceland of 1871 was in many ways 
indistinguishable from that of 1571 or 1271. 
Icelanders will tell you that Europe's last 
thousand years passed in rheir last 
hundred. Here is the only place in foe 
world where a time-traveller's millennial 
leap would discover more alteration in the 
coastline than in the conversation. ■ 
For Morris, as for Auden and Ma&- 
Neice sixty years on, Iceland was the 
setting for the Sagas and Eddas. Contem¬ 
porary figures dot the landscape like tiny 
~ technicians long after the show. Though 
Morris met J6n Sigurdsson, father of the 
independence movement and one of 
Iceland’s greatest figures, he noted him 
merely as “a literary man whose editions 
of Sagas I know very well”. 

For the Sagas alone people Morris’s 
-- Iceland. His beautifully simple but de¬ 
tailed accounts of the landscape are 
heightened by his knowledge of what had 
happened there Thoreyamupr is “foe 
place where Gretrir stood to challenge 
Slaying-bardi as he came bade from foe 
Heath-Slayings". Midfjordur Water is 
“where the bailplay in Grettla went on". 
Morris knows as well as the old fanners 
that foe Sagas are not myths. 

As the incident with "Wolf" attests, 
however, Morris's idealised Sagaland is 
constantly being assailed by the present. 

. He is not a natural traveller and too 
earnest a writer to gloss over his many 
discomforts. When foe consoling mist of 
the Sagas momentarily lifts, he exclaims: 
“Lord! what littleness and helplessness 
has taken the place of foe old passion and/' 
violence that had place here once..." L 
This nostalgic delusion that human¬ 
kind once graced, rather than disgraced, 
the world informs Morris’s peculiar 
behaviour at foe farm of Stafholt, when 
his hosts “offered to show me a seam of 
coal that lay. they said, in the clifbide 
above Nordura... I in my hatred of coal 
was incurious and refused." 

W hat is to the Icelanders of 
geological interest is to Morris a 
symbol of what has ruined both 
foe century and country he actually lives 
in. His happiest moments come when his 
experience fuses with his literary imagi¬ 
nation. riding towards Thingvellier — 
“most storied place of Iceland" — or 
hearing a farmer say, as Morris brushes 
himself off after an ignominious fail from 
his horse- **The skjaid is not quite used to 
riding then!" Morris would have under¬ 
gone numberless indignities to be named 
bard by a man of Iceland. 


ANATOLI RYBAKOV has 
one advantage over Jeffrey 
Archer, with whose blockbust¬ 
ers foe Children of the Arbat 
trilogy ought to be compared. 
Reviewers in Britain are much 
too delicate to treat a novel by 
a Russian writer who has been 
exiled to Siberia under Stalin 
with the hauteur they reserve 
for their lowbrow, slick and 
inexplicably successful 
compatriots. 

Dust ' and Ashes is the 
concluding volume of Ryba¬ 
kov’s trilogy, which follows 
foe destinies of a group of 
childhood friends from the 
Arbat. Moscow’s benign an¬ 
swer to Sloane Square, in foe 
decade before the war with 
Germany. Upsetting slightly 
foe proposition that the recipe 
for a Russian bestseller is one 
part Harold Robbins to four 
parts Thomas Mann, it in¬ 
dudes a single decorously 
steamy sex scene among the 
hundreds of pages used to 
describe foe ruminating lead¬ 
ers of mankind. Hitler and 
Stalin. 

Of Stalin's purported rumi¬ 
nations. which are the book’s 
intellectual core, one can say 
that at their best they are 
inferior to foe benchmark 


Stalin, by Mann 
out of Robbins 


Andrei Navrozov 

DUST AND ASHES 
By Anatoli Rybakov 
Translated by Antonina 
W.Bouis 

Hutchinson, £16.99 
ISBN0091746329 


standard in Vasily Gross¬ 
man'S period novel Life and 
Fate. But where Grossman's 
Stalin is foe magic wand of 
totalitarianism that focuses 
the energies of a nation on a 
goal of world domination, 
here he is portrayed as a kind 
of angry pensioner, unfit for 
power and occupying the 
Kremlin because of a cosmic 
error. It was the Russian 
people that won it according 
to Rybakov — and, funnily 
enough, according to the hist¬ 
ory myth inculcated into 
Rybakov’s and another hun¬ 
dred million heads by Statin. 


Russian readers are justifi¬ 
ably addicted to their writers’ 
insights into the mind of the 
man who almost lost the 
world to Nazism but ended up 
conquering Europe. A serious 
answer to such questions in 
foe form of a highly 
specialised study of Stalin'S 
armaments programme. Ice¬ 
breaker by Viktor Suvorov, 
has recently sold five million 
copies in Russia. For Rybakov 
now to base a sweeping his¬ 
torical interpretation of the 
great tyrant on little more than 
gossip, intuition and his own, 
necessarily subjective and lim¬ 
ited experience of the war, is 
sheer hubris. 

Where Rybakov is quite as 
formidable as Grossman is in 
period detail. Here Vadim is 
trying to provoke his father, a 
famous doctor, into condemn¬ 
ing an ongoing show trial: 

“Gnawing on a chicken leg 
... Vadim said: 'I was at the 
trial at foe House of Unions. A 


creepy spectacle. I must tell 
you.' 

“His father ate in silence. 

“Bukharin. Rykov, and 
Yagoda are lousy; political 
vipers, and 1 understand their 
story. But the doctors — Levin. 
Kazakov, and most of all, 
Dmitri Dmitriyevich Pletnev. 
I couldn’t believe my own ears, 
what he was confessing to.’ 

"His father, bent over his 
plate, continued eating. 

“I don't understand. What 
made him do it? Murdering 
Kuibyshev and Maxim Gorky 

“Andrei Andreyevich put 
down his knife and fork, 
wiped his mouth with a nap¬ 
kin, leaned back in his chair, 
and. looking past Vadim, said 
calmly. ‘Dmitri Dmitriyevich 
did not treat Kuibyshev."* 

It is historic moments and 
domestic microcosms like this 
dining room scene — tense, 
historically accurate and ex¬ 
tremely convincing in the 
good, old-fashioned sort of 
way — that lend Rybakov’s 
blockbusters foe intellectual 
respectability which Russian 
readers still require of their 
writers. But one wishes that he 
would leave the political mi¬ 
crocosm to others. 


Springs eternal 


MICHAEL CANNON’S sec¬ 
ond novel. A Conspiracy of 
Hope (Serpent's Tail. £9.99: 
ISBN 1 85242 5172) tells foe 
stories of its two principal 
characters. Jamie and Rachel, 
from school-leaving to when 
Jamie is in his forties and 
Rachel in her thirties. Jamie 
reacts against his working- 
class Scottish family and es¬ 
capes initially to America; 
Rachel completes a university 
degree but then sets out travel¬ 
ling across Europe to find 
herself. Jamie and Rachel first 
meet on a Greek island; in the 
final part of the novel, set 
several years later. Rachel and 
Jamie meet in London. 

Summarised like that this 
novel may sound lame. But 
like the authors striking de¬ 
but, The Borough, it isn't. 
Cannon observes his charac¬ 
ters wryly, but always with a 
profound humanity. A part of 
the deeper power of the book is 
precisely that it deals with 
unexceptional people, in fo e 
factory where he works brief¬ 
ly, Jamie is alienated by his 
workmates: Rachel is ill a t 


rase with the repression and 
hypocrisy of her family. They 
are both undram a tic outcasts 
from their classes and the 
novel vividly succeeds in ex¬ 
ploring their undramatic — 
but hence widely representa- 

nV -ri s ? lse of ^Placement. ■ 
• lie close of foe novel is a 
£T S, ° n of “toy gets girl". But 
overlying melancholy 
with which these lives are 
viewed is not contradicted by 
me relative solace of the 
conclusion. The blurb speaks 
of a fove story “with attitude". 
TTiat makes the story sound 
CTas s w hteh is one thing that 
it certainly isn’t. 

Aidan Day 


NEW AUTH 

mi PUBUSHYOUR Wl 


MINERVA Pm 

ZOdBaingitann 
Lono «] StY? 3DQ £ 


L 







* : 

. - • r -, , 



1 

r 

THE TI MES THrrpors... 



BOOKS 35 



Jonathan Mirskv a 

t balanced examination of the difficulties that face both China and Hong Kon g as 1997 approaches 

Machismo and a moral defence 


nf the handover m cWna™ !“ e 
arresting paraenfh -£ e,lp ' s 
policies on the w n a Pj?’ British 
have not orSr *-ssue 

sense of moral ^ a 

*e welfare™ for 
Kong, but they J?“P ,e of Hong 
fuelled by a 

Kong’S people are '' S on ^ 
qualified In - rhaps better 

than probably an V * emsc,v « 
independent $£*& ?* med 

ggse5S«£ 

co^J Q 3? 0n L l ? k an adva nee 
of this book to Governor 

£hm fatten? Qn July 10. in a 
5*?* in London. he made the 

ahT?Emn n PC Statement “Bril- 

Sirf i** 5 a moraI force 

and one For the good" He thr»« 

trailed that in Dumber vE 

when Mrs Thatcher, as she then 

52? aun l! to Hon B Kong from 
she had signed the 
treaty which returned the colony to 


HONGKONG 
China’s Challenge 
By Michael Yahuda 

Rout ledge, £J7SO 
ISBN 0415140700 


China in fogy, Emily Lau. who 
was then a ferocious journalist and 
snow an equally ferocious legisla- 

’? r ; Pdme Minister if 

sne thought delivering "over five 
million people into the hands of a 
communist dictatorship- was 
morally defensible.” 

During the Hong Kong 
endgame. Mr Patten therefore 
observed. Britain’s policies lo 
wards Hong Kong must be “mor¬ 
ally defensible". 

Nor does China hold every card. 
Mr Yahuda, Reader in Infema- 
nonal Relations at the London 
School of Economics, says that 
while there is a clock in 
Tiananmen Square displaying to 



Margaret Thatcher and Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang toast Hong Kong's future; December 19S4 


the second the lime remaining 
before the change in Hong Kong’s 
sovereignly, “the seconds tick for 
R?king too”. Hence the dual mean¬ 
ing of the word "challenge’’ in the 
book's title. 


If China manages a smooth 
handover, preserving the ex-colo¬ 
ny’s laws and freedoms, he says, 
thus ensuring that the basis and 
practice of its economic success 
remain intact, the mainland's 


economy will continue its rapid 
modernisation and its internation¬ 
al stature (never fully recovered 
from Tiananmen) will improve. 

As Mr Yahuda observes, there 
are considerable obstacles to this 


course. Apart from Hong Kong. 
IQ96-Q7 will be a fateful year for 
China. Deng Xiaoping will proba¬ 
bly die and the leadership struggle 
for succession will emerge openly 
in n party congress. Additionally, 
he says, re-securing Hong Kong 
represents for many Chinese an 
end to ISO years oi colonial 
humiliation. For the new leaders, 
therefore, wielding China* axe or 
scalpel in Hong Kong, rather than 
allotting if the great measure of 
autonomy guaranteed in the 1984 
treaty, would display nationalist 
machismo. 

One of Mr Ya huda's great 
srrengThs is his fairness, which 
over the years has ensured him 
access to British. Chinese, and 
Hong Kong officials. He under¬ 
lines that China and Hong Kong 
"evolved amid deepening igno¬ 
rance of important aspects of each 
others’ ways of life". Whitehall, 
too. is a mystery. Peking, Mr 
Yahuda points out, cannot believe 
the British have sacrificed trade 


advantages “for a moral cause that 
at the end of the day may yield 
Britain precious little". Resonating 
in the brains of China's negotia¬ 
tors is Deng Xiaoping’s precept: 
“Watch those British lest they grab 
Hong Kong's capital”. 

I disagree with Mr Yahuda for 
laying as much stress as he does 
on the steadily improving Sino- 

British relations, which in my \iew 
result not from give-and-take, as 
he suggests, but from British give. 
Pity the Foreign Office foor'sob 
diers in this diplomatic Dunkirk 
where there is no VE-Day in 
prospect 

B ut he is right to say ihat”it is 
impossible to envision cir¬ 
cumstances more conducive 
to undermining confidence in the 
run-up ro the handover” than 
Peking's installation in Hong 
Kong of a parallel government and 
legislature "working on different 
principles and to different agen¬ 
das". In 1997. when you "are 
watching this end of moral empire 
on television, and the transfer of 
six million people to a regime from 
which they or their parents fled, 
keep this book at your side. 


roes 


etern^ 




Daniel 
J- Boorstin 

admires the 
pluck of the 
amateur 

W hen representa¬ 
tives of 26 nations 
met at the Inter¬ 
national Merid¬ 
ian Conference in JS84, they 
voted to make the Greenwich 
Meridian the universal refer¬ 
ence point for measuring lon¬ 
gitude and time. But the 
French, who of course would 
not admit that Paris was not 
the centre of the world, insist¬ 
ed that the base meridian 
should instead run through 
their Paris Observatory, two 
degrees east of Greenwich. 
Still the world (and eventually 
die French) aoquiesced to 
Greenwich Mean Time, which 
now extends into niter space. 

We seem to have forgotten 
that time is longitude and 
longitude is time. For the time- 
rones of the world are mea¬ 
sured m heuirs (and degree* of 
longitude) east and west of 
Greenwich. Dava Sobel’s 
graceful and lively little book, 
will help us see how Green¬ 
wich attained its universal 
eminence. It also puts the 
spotlight on a neglected hero 
in the saga of the British 
Empire. Few others did as 
much as the lonely, inventive 
John Harrison (1693-1776) to 
help the British find their 
bearings on the sea. Other 
notables in this story include 
Sir Isaac Newton. Captain 
James Cook, and Captain 
William Bligh of the Bounty. 

The British obsession with 
“the longitude problem” was 
inspired by a catastrophe on 
October 22. 1707. when four 
home bound British warships 
ran aground at the Isles of 
Sciily with a loss of some 2JXX) 
men. The captain had no 
reliable way of finding his 
whereabouts and the islands 
had loomed unexpectedly. 

Latitude — bearings north 
and south of the Equator, 
marked by the northern and 
southern boundaries of the 
sun’s apparent motion over 
the year — had posed a 
manageable problem. But lon¬ 
gitude, the east-west marker, 
was far more difficult to 
distinguish at sea. So the 
British Parliament in a fam¬ 
ous Longitude Act of 1714. 
offered a reward of £20.000 \for 
a “Practicable and Useful" 
means of determining longi¬ 
tude at sea. The prize was to be 
awarded by a Board of Longi¬ 
tude, which offered an attrac¬ 
tive stage for personal 
posturing, bureaucratic delay, 
academic envy, and profes¬ 
sional malice. Harrison would 

suffer all these before he 
received his reward. 

The grand rivalry was be¬ 
tween the astronomical meth- 


A clockwork genius 


NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM 



Finding time and place: Harrison’s first submission for the longitude prize. “HI” which nearly won the bounty in 1736 


od (based on measurement of 
lunar distances and moon-to- 
star distances) and the chrono- 
metric method using some 
kind of dock. The former 
enjoyed the enthusiasm of the 
Board's famous scientists and 
astronomers royal, who had a 
vested interest in its technical¬ 
ity. But it was difficult on a 
roiling ship, required much 
auxiliary data and mathemati¬ 
cal expertise and might take 
hours to calculate. 

I n melodramatic contrast 
to the members of the 
Board, John Harrison 
had no formal education 
and had never even been 
apprenticed to a watchmaker, 
but. had the passion and 
imagination of the amateur. 
The word “chronometer" first 
came into English usage about 
1714 to describe a timekeeper 
designed for precision at sea. 

Apart from the obvious 
problems of the pitch and roll 
of a ship, an effective time¬ 
keeper at sea had to remain 
accurate despite wide varia¬ 
tions of temperature which 
made the parts expand and 
contract and so affected their 
rate of movement. Hamson 


— in one 


liad already solved this prob¬ 
lem for pendulum clocks by 
his clever “gridiron" design. 
When the pendulums in clocks 
expanded with the heat they 
grew longer and Ticked more 
slowly. Knowing that every 
metal expands at its own 
characteristic rate, he inge¬ 
niously combined long and 
short strips of two metals — 
brass and steel 
pendulum. The 
strips counteract¬ 
ed each other’s 
changes as tem¬ 
perature varied, 
and so the pen¬ 
dulum kept a __ 

constant length. “ 

A chronometer 

on a rolling ship could not 
depend on a moving pendu¬ 
lum but had to be activated 
and controlled by springs. For 
this purpose Harrison devised 
his own "grasshopper” escape¬ 
ment- Lubrication was also a 
problem for a timekeeper in 
widely varying temperatures: 
machines needed oil in their 
gears, bui lubricants got 
thicker or thinner with 
changes In temperature dur¬ 
ing a voyage, and so made the 
dock run slower or faster. 


LONGITUDE 
By Dava SobH 

Fnunh Fm/e. £12 
ISBN IS5702S024 


Freezing temperatures might 
stop the clock altogether. Har¬ 
rison. the master carpenter, 
devised a clock that never 
needed lubrication. The parts 
that normally needed lubrica¬ 
tion he carved of lignum vitae, 
a tropical hardwood that ex¬ 
udes its own grease. 

In his early tower clock in 
Brocklesby Park (built in 1722 
and still running today) Harri¬ 
son had made 

- the gears from 

oak. But he used 
oak only from 
fast-growing 
trees with a wide 

_ grain that was 

especially strong 
because of the 
high percentage of new wood. 

Harrison’s struggle for the 
Longitude Prize is a parable of 
the inspired amateur. Acute in 
self-criticism, he never ceased 
to see better ways of doing the 
job. Which makes Dava 
Sobel’s well-crafted story a 
history nor of one invention, 
bur of a series. 

In 1735. William Hogarth, 
the artist who had begun life 
as an engraver of watch cases, 
in his popular Rake's Progress 
showed a "longitude lunatic” 


sketching his own wild sol¬ 
ution on the walls of Bedlam 
Asylum. By the time of Harri¬ 
son's death, the chronometer 
for finding longitude was stan¬ 
dard equipment for captains 
of the East India Company. In 
1791, when the Company is¬ 
sued new’ logbooks, the print¬ 
ed pages showed a special 
column for “Longitude by 
Chronometer”. 

It was John Harrison, more 
than anyone else, who had 
perfected the device that would 
give these empire-builders 
their bearings. He had led the 
way for the chronometer as the 
only “Practicable and Useful" 
solution to the longitude prob¬ 
lem. In a nation built on a 
seaborne empire he had creat¬ 
ed a new industry of marine 
timekeeping which made 
Greenwich Mean Time in the 
late 20th century still an 
appropriate symbol of British 
conquest of the oceans. And 
we can thank Dava Sobel for 
rescuing this suspenserale of 
technology and seafaring for 
ail us armchair discoverers. 

Daniel J. Boorstin is 
Librarian of Congress 
Emeritus. 


I n 1814. Thomas Kendall 
set sail for New Zealand to 
make Christians of the 
cannibals. Armed with faith 
and muskets, he helped to 
establish the first Christian 
Mission and later founded a 
school house for Maori child¬ 
ren. But Kendall soon earned 
the rancour of his fellow 
missionaries by openly trad¬ 
ing in guns and powder, 
drinking too much and taking 
a Maori woman as his second 
wife. Reports of the man* 
outlandish behaviour eventu¬ 
ally reached London, and the 
Church Missionary Society 
suspended him in 1S23. 

Kendall* diaries and letters, 
along with other sources of the 
period, provide the inspiration 
for Judy Corbaiis's ambitious 
first novel. (She has also 
written several stories for 
children.) In the voices of its 
protagonists — Kendall, Iris 
illiterate wife. Jane, a convict, 
Richard StockweU. and the 
Maori chieftain Hongi Hika 
— Tapu tells the story of the 
missionary group* struggle 
for survival among the Noble 
Savages Kendall planned to 
civilise. 

For the most part, Corbalis 
convincingly evokes narra¬ 
tors. The self-righteous Ken¬ 
dall longs for the intellectual 
company London once afford¬ 
ed him and dismisses his 
unschooled wife* sturdy prag¬ 
matism. But it is Jane* simple 
clear-sightedness that domi¬ 
nates the novel. With a brood 

Frances Stead 
Sellers 

TAPU 

By Judy Corbalis 

Sindarr-Srevenson, £14.99 
ISBN 185619 330 X 


of small children to feed and a 
steadfast memory of the harsh 
realities of the rural life she 
once led in England, she has 
little time for her husband* 
theological sophistry: "Thy 
God that flogs a poor man if he 
steals a hare? Transports a 
man for pheasants and a 
leveret? Thy God that hangs 
his children for a loaf of 
bread?" Abandoned by Ken¬ 
dall when he escorts Hongi 
Hika to London, Jane accepts 
from the Maori the gift of a 
meal that saves her and her 
children from certain starva¬ 
tion: "And I still remembers 
the taste of that pork, like to 
nowt 1 have tasted all me life 
... Delicate it were, the crack¬ 
ling crisp and foil, the fat 
dripping down me chin and 
the sweet white soft flesh 
beneath so good to taste it 
would make me mither* best 
Lincoln pork to taste like 
swamp hen... No bar to me it 
were a human soul. And do it 
again I would. I swears, if it 
were that or perish.” Barba¬ 
rism. it seems, is in die eye of 
the beholder. 

But this is more than an 
elaborate reworking of the 
well-worn theme of cultural 
relativism. Corbalis* consis¬ 
tent sympathy for her charac¬ 
ters makes their individual 
stories engaging. She traces 
Kendall* growing friendship 
with Hongi Hika, and his new 


IN OCTOBER Robert Parker, 
the classical literary don at 
Oriel College, Oxford, will 
transfer to New College as 
Wvkehara Professor of An¬ 
cient History- What! A literary 

ShrEunerely mffi* 

Sspaws in the mire ofaneKmt 

sfeSSJS K 

sbssKSss 

^b.H.dii.era^or 

out the incumtentprofe; 
sJrt agenda With impress'™ 

^uT/worth emphasising that 

Farter* book i S no bypners 

^Wmns. undent^ 
that at abnost no po™ ^ 
Greek religion intersect witn 


Rituals of bureaucratic gods 


Peter Jones 

ATHENIAN 
RELIGION 
A History 
By Robert Parker 

Clarendon Press, £40 
ISBN 0 N S1497Q4 

(say) Christianity. Bibles, 
creeds and concepts like love 
and sin play no part- 

demanding paruotiar behav¬ 
iour or belief. Greek gods 
primarily required acknow- 
ledgement, in some nfoal 
form. Priests did not solve 
tricky theological problems or 


provide moral exhortation but 
ensured correct procedure. 
The required effort of imagi¬ 
nation is considerable. Reli¬ 
gion is like language: self- 
explanatory to speakers, an 
illogical, babel nonsense to 
non-speakers. 

Parker* title is carefully 
chosen. He points out that 
scholars tend to study Greek 
religion as a panhellenic phe¬ 
nomenon. and admits that, for 
example, the Greeks' strong 
sense of common cultural 
identity gives them grounds. 
Nevertheless, he argues that 
our evidence for Athenian 
religious practice is sufficient 
to permit intensive study of 


Athens alone, and here sets 
out to show’ how religion 
intersects with Athenian hist¬ 
ory and society from the 8th to 
3rd centuries BC. 

The notorious execution of 
Socrates in 399 BC for "impi- 
ety"lnoi believing in the city* 
gods, introducing new gods 
and corrupting the young) 
illustrates Parker* methods 
well. 

He points out that “corrup¬ 
tion of the young" was the 
main charge that the various 
surviving “defences of Socra¬ 
tes" tried to counteract, and 
uses the comic poet Aristopha¬ 
nes' parody Clouds to show 
thai (however wrongly) Socra¬ 


tes was commonly perceived 
as a sophist and atheist. He 
goes on to argue that, especial¬ 
ly in the late 5th century BC 
(possibly as a result of Athens’ 
political demise), the finger 
was increasingly pointed at 
the corrupting influence of 
these thinkers. The charges 
relating to gods simply added 
to the gravity of the offence, 
since in democratic Athens 
only the people could 
authorise their introduction. 

PARKER'S connections range 
far and wide. He argues, for 
example, that the main func¬ 
tion of the great calendar of 
sacrifices drawn up by Solon 


in the 6th century BC was to 
determine how much state 
money should be spent on 
what gods, and when (religion 
and economics); that the aris¬ 
tocratic rich used religious 
show to demonstrate their 
status (religion and power); 
and that the invention of 
democracy led to the elevation 
of Athens itself as an object of 
worship second only to the 
gods, and to that extent, 
religion was therefore not so 
much a mechanism for con¬ 
trolling the world as for cele¬ 
brating Athenian achieve¬ 
ments within it (religion and 
stale). 

It all bodes exceedingly well 
for andent history at Oxford. 

Dr Peter Jones helps run 
Friends of Classics at 
Newcastle University. 


Armed 

with 

faith 

and 

muskets 


fascination with the Maori 
gods and system of belief. She 
reveals Hongi Hika* determ¬ 
ination to befriend the English 
— and to acquire from them 
the muskets that will allow 


him to conquer rival tribes 
and exact revenge for his 
brothers' deaths. 

StockweU, meanwhile, pro¬ 
vides the navel’s philosophical 
underpinnings. An appren¬ 
ticed printer whose crime was 
to possess Thomas Paine* 
seditious treatise The Rights of 
Man . he re-examines his En¬ 
lightenment ideals of equality 
and atheism in the light of his 
experiences on the transport 
ships and among the Maori. 
Alive with historical detail and 
drama. Tapu invites us to re¬ 
examine our own definitions 
of civilisation. It is a remark¬ 
ably successful first novel. 

Frances Stead Sellers is 
Deputy Editor of Civilization. 
the Washington-based 
magazine of the Library of 
Congress. 


ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 



Barbarism in the eye of the beholden Maori chief, 1880s 



TIMES 

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36 LAW _ 

House of Lords _ Law Report August 15 1996 

Two rules of reinsurance contracts 


Hill and Others v M ercantile 
and General Reinsurance Co 
pic 

Reny and Others v Same 

Before laid Mackay of Clash fern. 
Lord Chancellor. Lord Goff of 
Chievefcy. Lord MustilL Lord 
Slynn of Hadley and Lord Hoff¬ 
mann 

{Speeches July 24J 
There were only wo rules, first 
that the reinsurer was nor liable 
unless the loss fell within the policy 
reinsured and the cover created by 
the reinsurance and. second, that 
the parties were free to agree on 
ways of proving that the require¬ 
ments were saris bed. 

Since under the contracts be¬ 
tween the parties there were issues, 
such as. whether there was a loss 
settlement or compromise settle¬ 
ment and since there might be 
arguable defences, there was an 
issue or question which ought to be 
tried that was sufficient to exdude 
the possibility of summary judg¬ 
ment under Order 14 of (he Rules 
of the Supreme Court. 

The House of Lords so held 
allowing appeals by the defen¬ 
dants, Mercantile and General 
Reinsurance Co pic rMSCl 
from a decision dated July 7. 1994 
of the Cou rt of Appeal (Lord Justice 
Nourse. Lord Justice Hirst and 
Lord Justice Waite) {The Times 
July 25: [19951 LRLR 160). whereby 
the court allowed appeals of the 
plaintiffs in one action. Mr Clar¬ 
ence Roy Hill and members of 
Lloyd's Syndicates 2, 176 and 372 
and Mr John Robert Cbarman and 
members of Lloyd's Syndicates 488 
and 532. and of the plaintiffs in the 
other action. Mr Tony Robert 
Berry and members of Lloyd's 
Syndicates S36 and 539 and other 
plaintiIT members of 22 other 
syndicates, from a decision dated 
January 31.1994 of Mr Justice Rix. 

The syndicates issued writs seek¬ 
ing orders against M & G for, enter 
alia, payment of the appropriate 
proportions of the full insured 
value under reinsurance contracts 
in respect of damage to 15 aircraft 
owned by the Kuwait Airways 

Council duty 
to assess 
special needs 

Regina v Berkshire County 
Council, Ex parte P 
The duty of a local authority to 
assess a disabled applicant's spe¬ 
cial needs, pursuant to section 47(11 
of the National Health Service and 
Community Care Act 1990. was not 
conditional upon its being shown 
(hat the local authority in question 
had in place existing arrange¬ 
ments to proride services of a kind 
which, in the light of the assess¬ 
ment. the applicant might need 
Mr Justice Laws so held in the 
Queen's Bench Division on July 9 
when allowing an application by 
P. through his mother and next 
friend, for judicial review and 
making orders of (i) certiorari to 
quash a derision of Ihe respondent, 
the County of Berkshire on 
November 30. 1995 assessing (he 
applicant's special needs, and (u) 
mandamus requiring the respon¬ 
dent to carry out a proper assess¬ 
ment of those needs in accordance 
with section 470) of the 1990 Act. 

HIS LORDSHIP said that sec¬ 
tion 47(1) contemplated not only 
the provision of community care 
services but also arrangement by 
the authority for such provision, 
and that the authority's duty to 
assess was not conditional on its 
being shown that there were in 
existence arrangements to provide 
the relevant services. 


Corporation (KAC). in August 
1990. in consequence of Iraqi 
invasion of Kuwait and takin g 
over those aircraft. 

The syndicates took out sum¬ 
monses under Order 14 of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court for 
summary judgments. The judge 
derided that the cases were not 
proper for summary judgments 
and gave M & G unconditional 
leave to defend. 

Mr V. V. Veeder, QC and Mr 
George Leggatt for M&G: Mr 
Jonathan Sumption, QC and Mr 
Andrew Poppleweil for the 
syndicates. 

LORD MLTSTILL said that the 
issues arose on assumed facts for 
summary judgments. Four sets of 
contracts were involved. 

First there was a contract be¬ 
tween KAC and a number of 
Kuwaiti insurance companies 
whereby the latter insured KAC 
against loss or damage to 15 
aircraft for the period between July 
1.1990and June 30. 1991 caused by. 
inter alia, "(a) War. invasion, acts 
of foreign enemies, hostilities 
(whether war be declared or not) 
... (e) Confiscation, nationalisa¬ 
tion, seizure, restraint, detention, 
appropiation. requisition for title 
or use by or under the order of any 
government.. ." 

The aircraft were insured on 
agreed values totalling US $692 
million. The policy also provided 
that “die maximum sum insured 
in respect of ground risks is US 
$300 million any one 
occurrence.. 

The second contract was a policy 
whereby syndicates or companies 
in the London marker, the primary 
reinsurers, reinsured the Kuwaiti 
insurers in respect of the direct 
insurances on terms said to be 
identical (o those or the direct 
insurance. The contract gave the 
primary reinsurers complete con¬ 
trol over negotiations and settle¬ 
ment of losses. 

Next, there were chains of excess 
of loss reinsurances, the intermedi¬ 
ate reinsurances, which started 
with the primary reinsurers and 
came to rest, evidently after many 

Discretion 
must not 
be fettered 

Regina v Secretary of State 
for the Home Department, 
Ex parte Hastrup 
A minister of the Crown would 
fetter his discretion unlawfully if 
he laid down a policy which had to 
be applied rigidly in particular 
cases. 

It was not unlawful for the 
Home Secretary to deport a man 
with a bad record of immigration 
offences even though he was 
married to a British citizen and 
they had a British child. Thai was 
so despite internal Home Office 
policy guidance that in such cases 
immigration history was rarely 
relevant. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Russell. Lord Justice Peter 
Gibson and Lord Justice 
Hutchison) so held on July 17 when 
allowing an appeal by the Home 
Secretary from a decision of Mr 
Justice Hidden on November 28. 
1995 quashing a decision to deport 
Adeyemi Hastrup as an illegal 
immigrant. 

LORD JUSTICE RUSSELL said 
nothing in the policy guidance 
document Marriage and Children 
(DP/2/931 fettered the Home Sec¬ 
retary's discretion although it did 
give him guidance. The policy did 
not say that immigration history 
was never significant. 


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circles through the spiral, with 

ceain syndicates or companies, 

the inward reinsured. 

The penultimate set of contracts 
comprised further excess of kiss 
reinsurances made between the 
inward reinsured and certain 
sydicates repre sen ted in the cur¬ 
rent litigation by the individual 
respondents u the two conjoined 
appeals now before the House, die 
inward contracts. 

Thai contract included the 
following term, described as 
“settlements clause... in respect of 
aviation business": “All loss settle¬ 
ments by the reassured including 
compromise settlements and the 
establishment of funds for the 
settlement of lasses shall be bind¬ 
ing upon the reinsurers, providing 
such settlements are within (he 
terms and conditions of the orig¬ 
inal policies and/or contracts ... 
and within the terms and con¬ 
ditions of this reinsurance." 

Finally, there were the “outward 
contracts". They were excess of loss 
policies, made by the syndicates 
with various companies and syn¬ 
dicates. including M&G. in re¬ 
spect of the risks reinsured under 
the inward policies. It was under 
those contracts that the present 
dispute had arisen. It was agreed 
(hat they all incorporated the 
settlements clause. 

The events which were said to 
found claims under the policies 
along the chain were that on 
August 2. 1990 Iraqi invading 
forces seized control of the 15 
aircraft on the ground at Kuwait 
airport. Within the following few 
days, the aircraft were flown to 
Iraq. Subsequently, they suffered 
damage. Those events took place 
during the cover of the direct 
contracts and of all the 
reinsurances. 

On any view of the facts, the 
losses occurred while the aircraft 
were on-risk under the direct 
contracts. Further, on the basis 
that the origin of the ultimate 
destruction was the invasion of 
Kuwait and the removal of the 
aircraft it would be arguable that 
the whole mailer constituted “any 


one occurrence" for the purposes of 
the aggregate limit of the direct 
contract insurance or reinsurance. 

As to die outward contracts, if 
the aircraft should be regarded as 
lost when they were seized in 
Kuwait and soon afterwards taken 
away to Iraq the losses happened 
whilst the aircraft were on-risk 
under the outward contracts and ft 
would be arguable that the losses 
were “arising from any one event", 
within joint excess loss clauses, for 
the purpose of calculating the net 
kiss. 

The syndicates were not satisfied 
with the way the claims were being 
handled. They issued writs under 
the outward contracts seeking the 
appropriate proportions of the full 
insured value of the relevant 
aircraft and certain declarations 
against M&G. 

There were only two rules, both 
obvious. 

First, that (he reinsurer could 
rvit be held liable unless the loss 
fell within the cover of the policy 
reinsured and within the cover 
created by the reinsurance. 

Second, that the parties were 
bee to agree on ways of proving 
whether those requirements were 
satisfied. 

Beyond that, all the problems 
came from the efforts of those in 
the market to strike a workable 
balance between conflicting prac¬ 
tical demands and then to express 
the balance in words. 

The crucial words in the settle¬ 
ments dause were “within the 
terms and conditions" of the 
original policies and of the reinsur¬ 
ance. Those words drew a distinc¬ 
tion between the facts which 
generated claims under the two 
contracts, and the legal extent of 
die respective covers. 

The purpose of the distinction 
was to ensure that the reinsurer's 
original assessment and rating of 
the risks assumed were not fal¬ 
sified by a settlement which, even 
if soundly based on the facts, 
transferred into the inward or 
outward policies, or both, risks 
which properly lay outside them. 

That restriction was perhaps 


more dearly visualised in relation 
to the second provisa Here, the 
reinsurers were entitled to say that 
they rated the policy by reference 
to its chronological and geographi¬ 
cal extent, to the types of casually 
insured, to the boundaries of the 
insured layer, the mode of calculat¬ 
ing the less, and so forth. Those 
variables, defined by the terms of 
the policy, founded the bargain 
between reinsurers and reinsured 
cm the basis of which the premium 
and other terms were set. 

The purpose of the second 
proviso was to keep that founda¬ 
tion intact and it would be under¬ 
mined if an honest attempt by 
those further down the chain to 
ascertain the legal consequences of 
the fads could impose on the 
reinsurers responsibilities beyond 
those expressed in the policies. 

So also with the first proviso. 
The reinsurers undertook to pro¬ 
tea the reinsured against risks 
which they had written, not risks 
which they had not written. 

To allow even an honest and 
conscientious appraisal of the legal 
implications of the facts embodied 
in an agreement between the 
parties down the chain to impose 
on the reinsurers risks beyond 
those which they had undertaken 
and those which the reinsured had 
undertaken would effectively re¬ 
write the outward contract It was 
that which the provisos were 
designed to forestall. 

That opinion, combined with the 
existence of arguable defences, was 
sufficient to exdude the possibility 
of summary judgment, based on 
any settlements which could be 
alleged to have been made. Quite 
apart from that there was the 
question whether there was a "loss 
settlement ... or compromise 
settlement" within the settlement 
dause. 

Under the dause there was an 
issue or question in dispute which 
ought to be tried. 

The Lord Chancellor, Lord Go ft 
Lord Slynn and Lord Hoffmann 
agreed. 

Solidlors: Barlow Lyde & Gil¬ 
bert; Clyde & Co: Manches & Co. 


Union’s opposition was 
not industrial action 


Knowles and Another v Fire 

Brigades Union 

Before Lord Justice Neill, Lord 

Justice Milled and Lord Justice 

Phillips 

[Judgment July 31| 

The fire Brigades Union's oppo¬ 
sition to full-time fire fighters 
being additionally employed on 
retained fire fighting contracts did 
not constitute other industrial ac¬ 
tion within the meaning of section 
66(2)(a) of the Trade Union and 
Labour Relations (Consolidation) 
Act 1992. 

Therefore full-time employees 
who were disciplined by the union 
for entering into retained contracts 
had not been unjustifiably disci¬ 
plined for failing to participate in 
or sujipon a strike or other 
industrial action. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
when unanimously dismissing an 
appeal by Michael Knowles and 
David Johnson, two full-time fire 
fighters employed by Shropshire 
County Council, from a derision 
dated December S. 1995 of the 
Employment Appeal Tribunal 
overruling a decision of an indus¬ 
trial tribunal sitting in South 
London on October 20. 1993 that 
the Fire Brigades Union's oppo¬ 
sition constituted other industrial 
action. 

Mr Jeremy McMullen, QC and 
Mr Jonathan Gavaghan for die 
employees; Mrs Laura Cox, QC 
and Mr Nicholas Randall for the 
union. 

LORD JUSTICE NEILL said 
that retained fire fighters were not 
in full-time employment but were 
paid a fee each year to be ready 
and on standby to be called out for 
fires. They received an extra fee for 


each fire to which they were 
summoned. 

For about 15 years from 1961 a 
system was in force whereby full¬ 
time fire fighters were eligible to 
undertake duties similar to those 
of retained fire fighters. That 
system was not favoured by tire 
union and by 1977 it was derided to 
phase it out. in I9S6. however, due 
to difficulties with recruitment of 
retained fire fighters, the employ¬ 
ers proposed to reintroduce full¬ 
time retained duties. 

That was unanimously rejected 
by the union at its annual con¬ 
ference and members were in¬ 
formed. The union recommended 
the rejection of retained contracts 
for fid 1-time fire fighters and a 
campaign do eradicate the whole 
time/retained duty system. 

On April 15,1992 both appellants 
enrolled as retained fire fighters. 
In October 1992 the union's disci¬ 
plinary committee resolved that 
the appellants should be expelled. 
They commenced the present 
proceedings. 

His Lordship said that indus¬ 
trial action could take many forms, 
but in the absence of any statutory 
definition, any attempt at a para¬ 
phrase was unlikely to be useful. 

The question of what was indus¬ 
trial action for the purposes of 
section 65 was a mixed question of 
fact and law. In large measure it 
was a question of fact but the fads 
had to be judged in the context of 
the 1992 An which plainly contem¬ 
plated that industrial action was a 
serious step. 

It was necessary to look at all the 
circumstances which included the 
contracts of employment of the 
employees and whether any 
breach of or departure from the 


terms of the contract were in¬ 
volved. the effect on the employer 
of what was done or omitted and 
the object which the union or the 
employees sought to achieve. 

In the present case the relevant 
factors were: 

1 At the date the appellants were 
expelled from the union the policy 
had been in force for over IS 
months. The object to be achieved 
by the union* policy was to- 
prevent a unilateral departure 
from the terms which had been 
agreed in 1977. 

2 The policy did not require full¬ 
time workers to break or depart 
from the terms of their existing 
con tracts. It merely required Ore 
fighters not to undertake addi¬ 
tional new contracts, 

3There was no evidence to suggest 
that richer (he county council or (he 
union contemplated that the pres¬ 
sure exerted by the union required 
the support of a ballot 
4 It was reasonable to assume that 
some of the 45 other fire fighters 
had refused offers of retained 
contracts. But (heir compliance 
with the union's polity did not on 
the facts of the case amount to a 
dear indication that the union and 
its members had crossed the 
threshold into taking industrial 
action within the meaning of 
section 65. 

The Employment Appeal Tri¬ 
bunal was justified in concluding 
that the industrial tribunal had 
misdirected itself in treating pres¬ 
sure plus inhibition resulting from 
pressure as a sufficient test of 
industrial action. 

Lord Justice Millett and Lord 
Justice Phillips agreed. 

Solicitors: Free Representation 
Unit; Robin Thompson & Partners. 


Dishonest failure to seek 
VAT registration 


Commissioners of Customs 
and Excise v Stevenson 
A dishonest failure to apply for 
registration for value-added tax 
was conduct capable of engaging 
liability to a penalty under section 
13(11 of ihe Finance Act 19S5, and 
subsection (3) provided how “the 
amount of tax evaded or... sought 
to be evaded" was to be calculated 
in particular cases. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Evans. Lord Justice PWer 
Gibson and Lord Justice Brooke) 


so held on July 16 in a reserved 
judgment dismissing (he appeal of 
Mr C. S. Stevenson, managing 
director of Telford Building and 
Design Ltd. against die judgment 
of Mr Justice Buxton (|1995| STC 
667) when he allowed the appeal of 
ihe commissioners against the 
derision on February 10.1994. of a 
London VAT tribunal which 
allowed the appellant's appeal 
against the imposition by the 
commissioners of a penalty for 
evasion of VAT by dishonest 


omission under section 13(1). 

LORD JUSTICE BROOKE said 
that Parliament dearly intended 
the present type of lax evasion to be 
caught by the wide words of 
section 13(1). 

If Parliament had intended, as 
submitted, to penalise tax evasion 
only when it was achieved follow¬ 
ing a dishonest declaration to the 
VAT authorities, it would have 
done so and not used the words 
"where... a person does any act or 
omits to take any action..." 


THE TIMES THURSDAYj^^|£liL^^ 

-- Co urt of Appeal 

School should consider 
effect on victim 


£ 


Regina v Camden London 
Borough CoundL Ex parte H 
(a Minor) 

Before Lord Justice Kennedy. Lord 
Justice Auld and Lord Justice 
Thorpe 

(Judgment July 30j 

In considering whether to reinstate 
two pupils permanently excluded 
from school by their headteacher 
for their involvement in the shoot¬ 
ing of another pupil with a pellet 
gun, the school governors and 
local education authority repre¬ 
sentative acted unlawfully in fail¬ 
ing properly to investigate 
inculpatory accounts of the'in¬ 
cident and in flailing properly (u 
investigate the effect on the victim 
of the excluded pupils' return. 

The Court of Appeal so held in a 
reserved judgment, allowing H's 
appeal, by his father and next 
friend, against Mr Justice Tucker'S 
dismissal of H's application for 
judicial review on May 14. and 
remitting for rehearing the de¬ 
rision of Camden London Borough 
Council, by their local education 
authority representative, and 
school governors on April 23 not 
permanently to exclude rwo pupils. 
A and B. from the school. 

Mr Rabinder Singh for H: Ms 
Sarah Forster for the Iccal edu¬ 
cation authority and governors: 
Mr Anthony Bradley for A and B. 

LORD JUSTICE KENNEDY 
said that H, a child with special 
needs, suffered from impaired 
hearing which resulted in bullying 
at a previous school and caused 
emotional vulnerability. He 
moved to his current school in 
December 1995 and settled well. 

In March 1996 while playing at 
school he was hit behind his' ear by 
a pellet fired from a BB Air Sport 
gun by A The weapon, of a type 
which could be bought in a toy 
shop, looked Hke a firearm. It had 
been brought into school the 
previous day by B. H lost 
consciousness lor a short time and 
went (o hospital with his father 
where he was kepi under observa¬ 
tion for four hours. 

The headteacher excluded A and 
B from the school for 12 days and 
subsequently decided to make that 
exclusion permanent At a sub¬ 
sequent governors’ meeting on 
April 23. to which A’s and B's but 
not H's parents were invited, the 
governors and representative of 
the local education authority de¬ 
cided to reinstate A and B. 


Section 24 of the Education (No 
2) Act 19tSn and the arndes or 
Government of the school pro* idea 
for it (o be the duty of the governors 
and of the local education au¬ 
thority separately to consider 
whether each pupil 
should be reinstated. Trte DEt 
Circular Exclusions front school 
N o 10/94 (May 1994) gave guid¬ 
ance as to the proper use of the 
exclusion sanction. 

There were two significant 
grounds of challenge (t> that the 
governing body and the local 
education authority, unlike the 
headteacher, considered it im¬ 
portant to deride whether A delib¬ 
erately fired the gun at H and that 
they nude insufficient inquiries 
before resolving that issue: and (if) 
that the governors and local edu¬ 
cation authority paid so much 
attention to the needs of A and B 
that other important matters, such 
as the effect of the derision on H. 
on other children and on the 
maintenance of discipline in the 
school, did not receive proper 
consideration. 

The governors considered that 
m relation to A the crux of the 
matter was whether he intended to 
do H harm. If that was to be 
regarded as a critical issue then it 
was important to give careful and 
even-handed consideration to all of 
the available evidence in relation 
to it. 

The exculpatory accounts of A 
and B were carefully considered, 
the boys were questioned and A 
was given an opportunity to re¬ 
enact. but potentially inculpatory 
accounts were not investigated in 
the same way. Nor was any 
attempt made to find out what 
pupils said in the police 
investigations. 

The critical effect of that lack of 
balance was that the governors 
were satisfied that the incident was 
not premeditated. 

Governors and local education 
authority repr e s en tatives did not 
on every occasion have to carry out 
searching inquiries involving call¬ 
ing oral evidence: but having 
decided what factual issues they 
had to resolve and what inquiries 
they could reasonably make to 
resolve them, die governors and 
local education authority had to 
make sure that the 'inquiries 
proposed were reasonably thor¬ 
ough and were not open to the 
criticism justifiably levelled in this 
case that (hey were unbalanced. 

The governors and local edu¬ 


cation authority were right to give 
considerable weight to the back¬ 
ground of A and B. including djmr 
individual problems, and to their 
apparent comrition. But where, as 
here, there was a chiM victim the 
overall case requiredI some renous 
investigation °[ ,heeD ^L vvt ^ h 

d setting aside of the 
hSSSdier-s decision would have 
on die injured boy 

The governors assumed that it 
the permanent exclusion of A and 
B Jere lifted H would remain at 
the school and be able to come to 
ternis with what had occurred.But 
that was something about which 
the governors and local education 
authority could quire easily. 

I Wore shou'd have ^mjed 
more information from H and H'S 
father, the headteacher, education 
social worker, educational 
psychologist and perhaps also HS 
doctor. 

The evidence might have in¬ 
dicated that in reality a choice had 
to be made between maintaining 
H in the school and revering the 
headteacher's decision m relation 
to A and B. 

If that was the case the gov¬ 
ernor* and local education au¬ 
thority might well have concluded 
that in justice to H. and in order to 
maintain discipline and good con¬ 
duct to secure an orderly ieanung 
environment in the school, they 
should not interfere with the 
decisions made by the 
headteacher. 

The procedure in relation to the 
inquiry 35 a whole w-as flawed m 
two respects: first, by an inad¬ 
equate investigation as to what 
happened when H was injured; 
and second, by an inadequate 
investigation of the probable effect 
of any interference with the 
headteacher's derisions on the 
future of H and thus on the future 
of the school. 

The matter would be sent back 
for re-determination by a dif¬ 
ferently constituted committee of 
the governing body with a dif¬ 
ferent local education authority 
representative. His Lordship 
reached that conclusion with re¬ 
gret. recognising that those who 
fell into error nevertheless acted 
conscientiously in good faith with 
a desire to do their best for all 
concerned. 

Lord Justice Auld and Lord 
Justice Thorpe agreed. 

Solicitors: Bind man & Partners: 
Ms Amanda Kelly. Camden: 
Teacher Stem Selby. 


Foster parent has right to 
appeal over special needs 


Fairpo v Humberside County 
Council 

Before Mr Justice Laws 
(Judgment July 16] 

A local- authority- foster parent 
came within the definition of 
"parent" for the purposes of mak¬ 
ing an appeal in relation to a child 
m her care for whom the local 
authority had declined to make a 
statement of special educational 
needs. 

Mr Justice Laws so stated in the 
Queen's Bench Division when 
adjudicating on a preliminary 
issue raised in an appeal by Jean 
Fairpo against a decision of the 
special educational needs tribunal 
of April 26. 1995 not to make a 
statement of special educational 
needs in respect of D, a child 
subject to a care order, to Humber¬ 
side County Council placed with 
her as a local authority foster 
parent. 

Mr Paul Greaney for Mrs 
Fairpo: Mr Roger McCarthy. QC, 
for the council. 

MR JUSTICE LAWS said that 
an issue raised by the council was 
of some substance and perhaps of 
some general importance in the 
context of the statutory regimes 
relating to die education and care 
of children. 

Mr McCarthy submined that 
the appellant had no legal right to 
appeal to the tribunal: only a 
parent enjoyed such a right and 
she was not within the meaning of 
(he term "parent" as defined for the 
purposes of the Education Act 
1993. 

If that were correct, she had no 
locus standi since an appeal under 
the Tribunal and Inquiries Act 
1992 could only be brought by a 
party to the proceedings below and 
“party" had to mean a proper 
party having regard to the statu¬ 
tory measures relating to locus 
before the tribunal whose derision 
was sought to be appealed. 

Mr Greaney accepted that only a 


parent could appeal to the tribunal 
under section 169 of the 1993 Act 
and having regard to subsection (Z) 
that was plainly right The tri¬ 
bunal had no general jurisdiction, 
only that which was c on ferred by 
the subsection. . 

However, he submitted that the 
appellant fell within the statutory 
definition of "parent", and even if 
she did not, she was nevertheless a 
proper party before the court 
under the terms of the 1992 Acl 
H is Lordship addressed the 
sense to be attributed to “party" in 
[Ik 1992 Acl 

Section 11 provided: “(I)... if any 
party to proceedings before any 
tribunal specified... is dissatisfied 
in point of law with a derision of 
the tribunal he may ... appeal." 

The premise of the scheme 
outlined in Order 55. rule 7 of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court which 
regulated the court's powers on a 
statutory appeal, was that die 
proceedings below were properly 
constituted in the first place. 

In those circumstances it was 
plain that a "party" entitled to 
appeal under the 1992 Act must be 
a person who was properly before 
the tribunal: see 5 fa Minori v 
Special Educational Needs Tri¬ 
bunal (The Times December IS, 
1995: |1996| I WLR 382). 

His Lordship rejected the argu¬ 
ment that even if Mrs Fairpo was 
not entitled to appeal to the 
tribunal, nevertheless she was 
entitled to appeal to the court 
The real question was whether 
she had any legal right to go to the 
tribunal under section 169 of the 
1993 Act. That depended if she fell 
within the statutory definition of 
“parent". 

The definition was found in 
section ])4{)D) of the Education 
Act 1944. as inserted by Schedule 
13 to the Children Act 1989, and 
was incorporated into the 1993 Act 
by section 305(3) of that Art 
It provided: “In this Act unless 
the context otherwise requires, 
■parent', in relation to a child or 


young person, indudes any person 
— fa) who is not a parent of his but 
who has parental responsibility for 
him. or (b) who has care of him.. 

His Lordship rejected the argu¬ 
ment that the active exercise- of 
parental YepsonstbUfty by another, 
whether natural parent or local 
authority, must be taken to dis¬ 
place a person in Mrs Fairpo's 
position from the section 114(1 D)(b) 
definition. 

His Lordship could see no policy 
reasons for exduding such a 
person. Had ft been intended to 
di&saply the definition in such 
circumstances one would have 
expected the 1993 Act to say so. 

In their natural sense the words 
of section 114(10} were apt to apply 
to a person in Mrs Fairpo's 
position. 

Without wishing to commit the 
solecism of re-defining the statu¬ 
tory definition, his Lordship appre¬ 
hended that the reference in the 
subsection must be to someone 
involved in the full time care of the 
child on a settled basis. 

His Lordship acknowledged that 
was itself a formulation without 
hard edges, but it seemed to 
represent the thrust of whar Par¬ 
liament intended and to conform 
to the ordinary meaning of the 
words used. 

On that footing the potential for 
conflict might be modest in prac¬ 
tice in relation to the child's 
natural parents. 

As regards the local authority 
having parental responsibility, it 
was by no means obvious having 
regard to the whole of the statutory 
background, that where the au¬ 
thority disagreed with the foster 
parent about a matter touching the 
child's education, capable of 
resolution by the special educa¬ 
tional needs tribunal, it was un¬ 
desirable that the foster parent 
should be allowed ro test the issue 
before the tribunal. 

Solicitors: Langleys, York; Mr 
Ivor Davies. Beverley. 


Convention does not apply when proceedings discontinued 


Internationale Nederlanden 
Aviation Lease BV and Oth¬ 
ers v Civil Aviation Authority 
and Another 

Before M r Justice Morison 
(Judgment June 13] 

As a court which was first seised of 
an action did not remain first 
seised oooe proceedings had been 
discontinued, articles 21 and 22 of 
the Brussels Convention 1968, 
which were concerned with 
concurrent proceedings, had no 
application when a party had 
property discontinued the first set 
of proceedings. 

Mr Justice Mori son so stated in 
the Commercial Court of the 
Queen's Bench Division, in a 
judgment given in open court 
following a hearing in chambers, 
when dismissing an application by 
Internationale Nederlanden Avi¬ 
ation Lease BV. a corporation 
established under the laws of Hie 
Netherlands, and EAL (Delaware) 
III Corporation, a corporation 
established under the laws of 
Delaware, and Air Operations of 
Europe AB. a corporation estab¬ 
lished under the laws of Sweden, to 
discontinue, proceedings arising 
out of the detention of an aircraft 
on October 22. 1993 by the Civil 
Aviation Authority on behalf of 
Eurocontrol, the European Org¬ 


anisation for the Safety of Air 
Navigation. 

Mr Andrew Lydiard for the 
plaintiffs; Mr Mkiiae) Bekjff. QC 
and Mr David Wolfe for 
Eurocontrol. 

MR JUSTICE MORISON said 
that proceedings had commenced 
on November 9. 1993 when the 
plaintiffs, who were the mort¬ 
gagee. owner and lessee of the 
aircraft, alleged that the detention 
was unlawful. 

Proceedings were later brought 
by the CAA concerning the right to 
sell the aircraft. Judge Diamond 
was required to rule on the 
question as to whether the deten¬ 
tion of the aircraft was lawful or 
unlawful. He ruled that it was 
lawful. 

Those proceedings were not 
directly concerned with the merits 
of the plaintiffs* action against the 
CAA and E ur o c ontrol, although 
the overlap was dear. Effectively, 
although not formally, the judge's 
ruling rendered further proceed¬ 
ings in the action somewhat 
academic 

On August I. 1995 the plain tiffs 
commenced proceedings against 
Eurocontrol in Belgium- An issue 
had been raised in the Belgian 
court under article 21 of the 
Brussels Convention. 


The case pleaded against 
Eurocontrol m the Bdgian 
proceedings comprised a daim for 
damages for "reckless and vexa- 
tious seizure of the aircraft". 

I t was dear that the nature of the 

daim in the Brussels action was 
equivalent to the tort of wrongful 
interference with property. In 
other words the plaintiffs were 
seeking from the Belgian court a 
finding that the detention was 
unlawful and if successful the 
judgment would be inconsistent 
with the judgment of the English 
court. 

His Lordship approached the 
question of the extent that the court 
could properly say anything about 
the Bdgian proceedings and the 
way in which that court would 
approach artides 21 and 22: see 
Overseas Union Insurance Ltd 
and Others v New Hampshire 
Insurance Company (Case C- 
351/89) (|I991| ECR 3317,3348-9). 

It was not (he court's function to 
"second guess" let alone dedde 
how the Brussels court would 
decide issues relating to artides 
under d ie Convention. It would be 
impertinent and wrong in prin¬ 
ciple for the court to expires any 
views as to how the Belgian court 
would rule. 

However, the position was com¬ 
plicated because the present 


application involved the exercise of 
a general discretion. One of rhe 
factors to weigh was the counter¬ 
vailing injustices to the parties 
were the application (o be granted 
or refused. 

Further, his Lordship was en¬ 
titled. if not obliged, to have regard 
to the Convention in striking Ihe 
balance. 

His Lordship could not entirely 
disregard the position in the 
Brussels action and the application 
of the Convention to the two sets of 
proceedings. 

The position was yet further 
complicated by the question as to 
whether a court which was first 
seised remained first seised even if 
the proceedings had been dis¬ 
continued. 

The aim of the Convention was 
to promote the recognition and 
enforcement of judgments in stares 
other than those in which they 
were delivered and it was therefore 
indispensable to limit the risk of 
irreconcilable derisions. To that 
end the Convention laid down 
rules which determined the place 
where the only litigation should be 
commenced. 

If proceedings were commenced • 
in more than one country, artides 
21 and 22 enabled the courts to 
make orders which sought to 
ensure that different derisions 


were nor given on the same issues: 
the second set of proceedings were 
stayed so as m permit the first in 
lime to be brought to judgment. 

It seemed reasonably dear that 
if articles 21 and 22 were directed at 
ihe problems caused by lis alibi 
pendens, once the lis had ceased, 
so that ihe court was no longer 
seised of the matter, the artides 
had no application. 

The pnxxedings must both be 
current so that they can be said to 
be concurrent To that extern his 
Lordship was folly in agreement 
with whai Mr Justice Potter had 
deaded in Gamlestaden pic Casa 
dcSueda SA »Hans Thulin (IIOQ 41 
Lloyd's Rep 433). 1 

However, with respect, the 
judge* reasoning could not be 
accepted. The question whether 
jurisdiction was established was 
not pertinent. The question was 
whether the court was still seised 
A court might still be seised of a 
case although its jurisdiction was 
not established. 

Therefore, his Lordship would 
respectfully suggest that the judge 
obviously meant that where there 
were no longer proceedings in the 
first court it was no longer seised of 
the matter and the second court 
need not decline jurisdiction in 
favour of iL 

His Lordship regarded the de¬ 


cision or Mr Justice Potter and the 
case on which he relied as persua¬ 
sive and compelling authority that 
articles 21 and 22 were concerned 
wiOi concurrent proceedings and 
had no application when a party 
had property discontinued the first 
set of proceedings. 

q i!? s ? on arose, therefore, 
Lordship should allow 
the p laintiffs to discontinue so as to 
remove the objection to the Brus- 
sels courts jurisdiction. 

.JJf. k’rdship would think it 
unjust ^ foe 

Praent proceedings should be 
<jj*Donfinued now before the mak- 
|ng of a formal judgment which 
sten f 8 y 311 administrative 
10 U* li B ht of the 
H" 8 ,? ajld w hich could 

and having 

regard to the Tact that the case had 
gone too far to be capable of beine 
fairly unscrambled. 8 

Furthermore it would, in general 

contracting stS?™ 3 d,fferent 
reibSd. appllcaUon would be 








1 






Search 


Law Report August 15 1996 


LAW 37 
Queen’s Bench Division 


-3* 


- 'p--- * 


? - r-i 


'I 


* 


4 * 


Another, Ex paiteCofie ° d 

£Sr Beij ™ « 

pudgment July 31] 

S ijy'T’S? r ,ms .» 

i SL S<Para “ J 35 
»hST. l S, , U!* 

£W?*S= 

*•* the apphca [ion was far a 
warrant so limited. a 

The Queen’s Bench Divisional 
SJJJ *? sta f^ , wtle n allowing an 
aftSV.i^ioal review bj 
^ Janet Cofie of the issue of a 

the South 

Western Magistrates' Court on 
24 ’^? S au| honsing Metro- 
pohtan Police officers to search 
Premises at 7S Oxford Gardens 
The court made a declaration that 
me warrant did not comply with 

inal Evidence Act IQ& 4 . 

Section IS of the 1984 Act 
proves: “(b) A warrant—(a) shall 
specify — (i) die name of the person 
who applies for fc (ii) the dare on 


warrant must be specific Revenue disregarded injunction 


Which jj is issued; fifi) [he enacr 

S5the ™* hith h is issued; “™* 
p , Premiss to be searched.. - 

Section 23 provides: ”.. 

premises' includes any place.. .* 

rJrJ S**™* c,a y , °n for Ms 
Cc.ric; Mr Nicholas Ainfcy for the 

«*rmussioner of Police of die 

™? X1,S ; *** i ustices d w "« 

appear and were not represented. 
IXJRDJUS-nCE BELDAM said 
Mr Clayton had submitted 
E* ^ "**»■* for the execu- 
hon of snaroh warrants contained 
in section 15 and 16 or the 1984 An 
were ,. nDl complied with and 
accordingly the entry and search of 
? e Premises was unlawful 
Poause the warrant did not am- 
PV w«h section I5{£>). 

Mr Clayton submitted that the 
warrant did not comply with die 
requirement or section 15 that it 
should specify “the premises to be 
searched". 

The section had to be strictly 
construed and where it was known 
that premises consisted of a num¬ 
ber of separate dwellings, it was 
necessary to specify the dwelling in 
question. 

His Lordship stated that not¬ 


withstanding the definition of 
-pn.Tni.se5" in section 23. where a 
constable knew that premises in¬ 
cluded or consisted of dwellings in 
separate occupation, in the context 
of suction 150(b) a constable was 
required to specify the premises 
which it was desired to enter and 
search. 

In section 15(6)(a)(iv) the warrant 
was to specify premises to be 
searched. Bearing in mind the 
purpose of the section, to specify 
was to describe in explicit terms 
the particular premises which it 
was desired to search. 

So interpreted, (he section did 
require the constable to describe 
only that part of the premises he 
desired to enter and search. 

Section 17 conferred powers of 
entry and search lor the purpose of 
arrest irrespective of who was the 
occupip provided the constable 
executing the warrant reasonably 
suspected the person whom he 
wished to arrest to be on the 
premises. 

A constable applying for a 
warrant to search for property 
might, but not necessarily, would 
be in a better position to state what 
part of the property in multiple 


occupation he desired to search 
than a constable who was going to 
execute a warrant of arrest. 

Nevertheless, the provisions of 
section |5 and 16 appeared la apply 
in warrants generally and to 
indude warrants to search for 
property as well as for persons. 

Section l7(lKb). W, (d) were 
situations in which a constable 
could exercise powers withour a 

warrant and it might be that the 
draftsman included the provisions 
of 17(3 to cover cases in which 
there was no warrant although 
that would not explain why limita¬ 
tions were conferred in cases 
under section 17(l)(al. 

Be that as it may, where a 
constable's desire was only io 
search a pan of premises which 
was divided into separaie dwell¬ 
ings and the common pans of the 
premises, it seemed to his Lordship 
that section 15 required that the 
constable applying for the warrant 
had to make dear to the justices in 
the information that die applica¬ 
tion was for a warrant so limited. 

Mrs Justice Smith agreed. 

Solicitors; Mr Carlos Da braes. 
North Kensington: Solicitor. 
Metropolitan Police. 


No time extension without good reason 




l \ . , J 


*■“ r ' '' 






Phillips v Taunton and Som¬ 
erset National Health Trust 
and Another 

Before Lord Justice Leggan, Lord 
Justice Morrill and Lord Justice 
Brooke 

(Judgment July 19] 

A court should not accede to an 
application by a party to proceed¬ 
ings. made ex parte, for an 
extension of time in which to file 
and serve particulars of claim and 
documents accompanying that 
pleading, without a written record, 
usually an affidavit, or the good 
reason that had to exist before any 
such extension would be granted. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
allowing the appeal of the defen¬ 
dants. Taunton and Somerset Nat¬ 
ional Health Trust and Henry 
Adrian Rainey, against the order 
of Judge Collins in Wandsworth 
County Court on August 21, 1995. 
when he allowed the appeal of die 
plaintiff, Alan Russell Phillips, 
from the order of District Judge 
Walker on July 4.1995, which had 
set aside the order of Deputy 
District Judge Lawrence an 
November 25,1994. 

The deputy district judge had 
granted the plaintiffs application 
ex pane for an extension of time for 
the service of particulars of daim. 
medical report and schedule of 
special damage; 

The Court of Appeal restored 


District Judge Walker's order 
which had so aside the plaintiffs 
claim for damages for personal 
injuries and loss suffered as a 
result of negligent medical treat¬ 
ment allegedly received from the 
defendants. 

Mr David L Evans for the 
defendants; Mr Simon King for 
the plaintiff. 

LORD JUSTICE LEGGATT 
said that the plaintiff, a promising 
cricketer when a boy. sustained an 
injury to his back on which was 
operated in September 1991. He 
claimed that delay in his treatment 
led to his inability to become a 
professional cricketer. 

Having originally consulted 
solicitors in Somerset, his present 
firm were substituted for them in 
October 1993. but they allowed 
proceedings to be deferred, with¬ 
out explanation, until just before 
expiry of die limitation period in 
1994. 

The solicitors applied ex parte 
without affidavit to a district judge 
and were granted an order permit¬ 
ting issue of proceedings with 
service of particulars of daim. 
medical report and schedule of 
spedal damage, required by Order 
6 of the County Court Rules, 
deferred for four months. 

There was evidence before the 
present court of how. in order to 
ease the firm's heavy practice in 


Wandsworth County Court, mat¬ 
ters were conducted by district 
judges in the Inner part of 1994. 
including an arrangement known 
as “Friday’s List" when an outdoor 
derk attended the district judge 
and informed him what orders 
were sought in relation to the 
firm’s matters. 

If he was satisfied with (he order 
sought (he judge granted the order 
without, h seemed, any affidavit 
evidence in support It looked as 
though the relationship between 
the district judges and the firm's 
outdoor derks had become much 
loo cosy. 

In circumstances where al¬ 
though themselves instructed in 

1993 the firm had by September 

1994 not yet instructed a doctor to 
prepare a report, there did not 
seem, in his Lordship'S view, to 
have been any case for permitting 
deferment of the particulars of 
daim. 

Certainly no such order should 
have been made without an affida¬ 
vit giving the reasons why it was 
necessary. It was thus difficult for 
the present court to assess the 
reasonableness of die order made. 

Having considered further 
circumstances, his Lordship said 
that the necessary documents 
deariy could have been available 
within die time originally allowed. 
Thus it was for the plaintiffs 
solidtors to justify the further 


extension sought and granted in 
November 1994. 

No good reason hod been given 
by counsel to explain the gram of 
the extension. 

Ir was on the judge (hat respon¬ 
sibility, at feast in part, rested for 
the slipshod practices adapted by 
the district judges. He recognised 
those practices were defective and 
presumably would have taken 
steps to rectify them. 

If in an emergency it was 
necessary to accept oral state¬ 
ments. that should only be done 
upon the applicant undertaking to 
file on affidavit the evidence to 
support the statements. 

In the present case there was no 
such record and nothing to provide 
an adequate explanation for the 
need to extend time at all. 

His Lordship expressed doubt 
whether the County Court Rules 
gave the court any power to extend 
rime for service of the particulars 
of daim as was done in the present 
case. Senyonjo v East London and 
City Health Authority (un¬ 
repaired. CA. November 17. 1995. 
Transcript No 1729 of 1995) a rwo- 
judge Court of Appeal was to the 
contrary but for present purposes 
it was not necessajy for the courtto 
hold whether it was wrongly 
decided. 

Solidtors: Le Brasseur J. Tickle: 
Rowley Ashworth. Wimbledon. 


Regina v Commissioners of 
Inland Revenue and Others, 
Ex parte Kingston Smith 
Before Mr Justice Buxton 
(Judgment July 30] 

It was not open to officers of the 
Inland Revenue ro disregard the 
terms of an injunction obtained by 
telephone from the duty judge at 
the Royal Courts of Justice, nor 
was it possible for those officers to 
seek to negotiate away the effect of 
that injunction with the applicants. 

Mr Justice Buxton so held in the 

Queen's Bench Division in con¬ 
tempt of court proceedings initi¬ 
ated by the court of its own motion 
arising out of an application for 
leave to move for judicial review 
made by Kingston Smith, a firm of 
chartered accountants. 

Mr David Goldberg. QC. Mr 
John Wallers and Mr Hugh Mc¬ 
Kay for the applicants; Mr John 
Gold ring. QC and Mr Charles 
Mis kin for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE BUXTON said 
that the proceedings had a pro¬ 
found effect and their implications 
would be far (lung. The court had 
found itself in the unwelcome 
position of haring to pursue seri¬ 
ous breaches of one of its orders. It 
was to be understood that in so 
doing it was acting under its duty 
to uphold the rule or law. 

On July 9. 199b the Commis¬ 
sioners of Inland Revenue ob¬ 
tained 13 search warrants from a 
circuit judge at the Central Crim¬ 
inal Court under section 20C of the 
Taxes Management Act 1970. as 
inserted by Schedule 6 io the 
Finance Aa 1976 and amended by 
section 146 of the Finance Aa 1989. 
in connection with an investigation 
into tax frauds alleged to have 
been committed by two named 
individuals. 

The warrants entitled officers of 
the Inland Revenue special compli¬ 
ance office to enter and search 


premises including those of the 
applicants. No suggestion hod 
been made that the applicants 
were in any way involved with the 
alleged tax’ frauds. 

The warrants were executed on 
July U. 1996. On that day a further 
nine warrants were obtained and 
executed. 

During the search the Revenue 
proposed to seize computer lock¬ 
up rapes or the computer lard 
disk. 

The applicants were concerned 
that material irrel evant to the 
investigation was to be scrutinised 
and that actual programs and 

records of (he firm were to be 
removed. 

Accordingly, an application was 
made by telephone to his Lordship 
who was the duly judge on July 11. 
1996. His Lordship granted an 
injunction with unmedtate effect 
and expedited the hearing for leave 
to apply for judicial review. 

It seemed to his Lordship appro¬ 
priate at thai stage to make an 
order to put the hard disk and 
back-up rapes into the applicant's 
solicitor's custody, for the ap¬ 
plicants to give undertakings and 
for the search to cease. 

There was to be an inter panes 
hearing the following day so that 
the appropriate position could be 
established. 

However, although the Rev¬ 
enue’s solicitor knew there was an 
injunction the search continued 
until 9.00pm. A Revenue officer 
had threatened the applicants with 
proceedings for obstruction if they 
did not allow die search to con¬ 
tinue. In his Lordship's view no 
citizen should have been put in that 
position. 

At an earlier hearing the Rev¬ 
enue had not sought to justify what 
had taken place although there 
had been a great deal of justifi¬ 
catory material in the Revenue's 
affidavits. Only a legal officer had 
offered an apology to the court. It 


was dear to his Lordship that the 
seriousness of what had transpired 
had nnf struck home. 

Since the applicants, under¬ 
standably. did not seek to apply to 
commit ihe commissioners, the 
court found itself in the difficult 
position of acting on its own 
motion to pursue the contempt. 
The court's remedy in such situa¬ 
tions included committal and 
sequestration. That was an 
extraordinary and most un¬ 
welcome position for the court to 

find itself in. 

A great deal of further evidence 
had been put before his Lordship 
from die commissioners and their 
employees. In an affidavit the 
Deputy Chairman of the Board of 
Inland Revenue. Mr Sieve 
Matheson. had apologised to the 
court. His Lordship accepted the 
apology but noted that if it had 
been offered earlier, it would have 
not been necessary to rake further 
action. 

There had been a misunder- 
sianding by the Revenue of the 
procedure and the nature of the ex 
parte relief granted by telephone. 

When a telephone application 
was made to the duty judge the 
applicant was told to inform the 
party subject id the injunction of 
the security number at the Royal 
Courts of Justice. The purpose of 
that was twofold: 

First, the judge would always 
seek to ensure (hat his clerk was 
aware of such an order and its 
terms, so that he could verify' the 
order upon request. 

Second, even with a very early 
dale for a substantive hearing it 
was open to the other party to 
apply for the injunction to be lifted. 

Before parting with the matter 
his Lordship took the liberty of 
drawing the Revenue’s attention to 
what went wrong so that the 
Revenue could review matters 
further. 

It was a large operation and it 


should have been more clovrfy 
controlled. The arrangements for 
legal advice were not satisfactory. 
Thai fed to non-lawyers aaing in 
conditions of stress and ihey had 
made'two errors. 

The first was that the Revenue 
officers did no! think that they 
were obliged to act on an injunc¬ 
tion without formal service of an 
engrossed document. 

That was a dear error, although 
it was to an extent understandable 
that a layman could make that 

error. 

By the time that was corrected 
the second error was being made. 
The official in charge of the search 
thought that the way forward was 
to negotiate with the senior partner 
of the applicants to continue the 
search. 

His Lordship accepted that she 
believed that she could come to an 
agreement with the applicant. The 
important point was ih3t she was 
wrong to think that she could 
resolve the mailer by agreement. 

Once a court order applied the 
applicant could not give per¬ 
mission for the other pany to aa in 
breach of iL 

It was a pity rhat she hod not 
been told in (he strongest terms 
that a court order was not open to 
negotiation. She should have been 
told thai the correct course was io 
return to the court. Thai course 
was considered but it had not been 
token. 

The story' was one of multiple 

errors and mistakes and had 
caused the wholly unjustified use 
of much of the valuable time of the 
court. The powers dial Parliament 
had conferred on the Revenue were 
important powers and his Lord- 
ship was fully confident that such 
errors would not be committed 
again in the exercise of those 
powers. 

Solicitors: Beach croft Stanleys: 
Solicitor of Inland Revenue. 


Court of Appeal can supply reasons 


No power to detain restricted patient 


Regina v North West London 
Mental Health NH(S Trust, 
Ex parte Stewart : 

Before Mr Justice Harrison 
{Judgment July 19] 

There was power under section 3 of 
the Mental Health Act 1963 to 
detain a restricted patient who had 
been conditionally discharged. 

Mr Justice Harrison so stated in 
the Queen's Bench Division in a 
reserved judgment when dismiss¬ 
ing an application by Cleveland 
Stewart for judicial review of a 
derision of the North West LondtRi 
Mental Health NHS Trust made 
on June I. 1995 to detain him in 
hospital compulsorily pursuant to 
section 3 of the 1983 Acl 

Mr Richard Gordon. QC and 
Miss Alison Foster for the ap¬ 
plicant: Mr Steven Kovals for the 
NHS Trust: Mr Michael Kent, 
QC as amicus curiae: the Sec¬ 
retary Df State for the Home 
Department and Secretary of State 
for Health were joined as respon¬ 
dents but did not appear and were 
not represented. 

MR JUSTICE HARRISON said 
that Part 111 of the 1983 Act 


contained provisions relating to 
the detention in hospital of patients 
concerned in criminal proceedings 
or-under sentence. 

Section 37 gave power to make a 
hospital order authorising the 
detention in hospital of a person 
convicted of an imprisonahle of¬ 
fence and section 41 gave power to 
make a restriction order placing 
certain restrictions on his dis¬ 
charge from hospital. 

The applicant was the subject of 
an order under section 37. He was 
also subject to a restriction order 
under section 41. As a restricted 
patient he had been conditionally 
discharged but not recalled when 
he was detained pursuant to 
section 3 under Part fl of the 1983 
Act Part U provided for the 
compulsory admission of patients 
to hospital for treatment 

In addressing the main issue as 
to whether a conditionally dis¬ 
charged restricted patient could 
lawfully be detained under section 
3 of the 1983 Act the rival 
contentions were whether, as the 
applicant contended, the two Parts 
of the 1983 Act were mutually 
exclusive or whether the two Parts 


could operate independently of 
each other. 

His Lordship noted that there 
was no authority on the point but 
that it had hitherto been common 
practice to detain conditionally 
discharged restricted patients 
under section 3 in appropriate 


That practice was endorsed by 
the Home Secretary and Health 
Secretary in notes for guidance 
and a code of practice issued 
pursuant to section IIS of the 1983 
Act 

While the case gave rise to a 
difficult and arguable point, due. 
in part, to imperfections in the 
drafting of the 1983 Act his 
Lordship fell that if Parliamem 
had intended that the exercise of 
the Part Ill powers should exclude 
the operation of the Part II powers, 
the legislation would have ex¬ 
pressly so provided. There was 
nothing in the Act which expressly 
excluded the operation of Part II in 
the case of a restricted patient. 

His Lordship considered the 
various relevant provisions and 
concluded that they did not dem¬ 
onstrate an intention on the part of 


Defendant cannot challenge 
leave to vexatious litigant 


Jones v Vans Cofina 
Before Lord Justice Nourse, Lord 
Justice Roch and Lord Justice 
Schiemann 
(Judgment July 30J 
Where a vexatious litigant hod 
been given leave, ex parte, under 
section 42(3) of the Suprem e Court 
Act 1981 m institute legal proceed¬ 
ings. the defendant to those 
proceedings could not apply *° 
court to set the leave aside. 

The Cburt of Appeal so held m 
^served judgments dismissing an 
appeal by the defendant. Gordon 
Charles Vans Colin a, from a 
derision of Sir John Wood, sitting 
as a judge of the Quern's Bench 
SvisWn April 

no powrio set aside the 

pjvjns leave to issue legal 
^ the pfointiff.Maxcus David 

Jones. 

Mr William Crowth er, QC and 
Mr Paul Storey for the defendant: 

Mr Jones in person. 

LORD JUSTICE NOURSE 

1989 a civil proceed^ 


Sir John Wood on a summons by 
the defendant, then seeking an 
amendment, and it was held that 
there was no power in the court to 
to set aside the leave given by Mr 
Justice TutJcey so thai Mr Justice 
Ognall-s order was a nullity. 

Relying on order 32, rule 6 of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court and 
observations of Sir John 
Donaldson. Master or the Rolls, m 
WEA Records Ltd v Visions Chan¬ 
nel 4 Ltd 01983] I WLR 721. 727) 
and mi Becker v Noel (Note) fll971| 
2 All ER 1248). Mr Crowther 

submitted that it was a fim- 
damentai rule of jusnee that an 
otder made ex parte could he 

aside on the application of the 
party against whom U had been 

Hie power expressed in order 32, 
rule 6, could only apply * f order 
made in proceedings m which the 
person seeking to have nj ** 
was either a party or soiled to be 
made one. The court could not 
accede to an applicant* made V a 
person who had no locus standi to 
make it. 


posed defendant was not entitled to 
be made a party to the application 
under section 42(3). 

There remained the Court of 
Appeal derision in Becker v Noel, a 
case that could not be distin¬ 
guished on the ground suggested 
by the judge and which Mr 
Crowther submined was binding 
on this court, where Lord Den¬ 
ning. Master of the Rolls, had said: 

“Not only may the court set aside 
an order made ex parte, but where 
leave is given ex parte it is always 
wjihin the inherent jurisdiction of 
the court to revoke that leave if it 
feels that it gave its original leave 
under a misapprehension on new 
matters being drawn to its 
attention." 

Either it had to be held that that 
was not in reality a binding 
decision, in as much as it was 
given on an interlocutory point 
without the benefit of argument or 
mature consideration, or that it 
was given per inairiam. Either 
way. it should not be followed. 

The circumstances of the instant 
case suggested that a repetition of 
some further observations of Lord 
Justice Davies in Becker v Teale (at 


the legislature to exclude the 
application of section 3 in respect 
of a conditionally discharged re¬ 
stricted patient. 

The Part 11 and Part Mi powers 
could co-exist and operate indepen¬ 
dently of each other. 

The provisions relating to re¬ 
stricted patients relied upon by the 
applicant were, in his Lordship'S 
view, dealing solely with patients 
in their capacity as restricted 
patients liable to be detained 
pursuant to a hospital order, a 
capacity which was not applicable 
to the power of admission and 
detention under section 3. 

That power was not excluded by 
the provisions of Part Ml. and the 
rights of a patient detained under 
that power existed, including those 
of access to the tribunal under 
section 66. whether or not he 
happened also to be a conditionally 
discharged restricted patient. 

If he were discharged by the 
tribunal, it would be a discharge in 
relation tu his liability to detention 
under section 3 which would in no 
way affect the secretary of stated 
powers to recall him as a restricted 
patient. Such a conclusion ensured 
that patients and those treating 
them could rake advantage of the 
benefits of treatment for the pur¬ 
poses mentioned in section 3(2)(c). 

His Lordship did not accept that 
the provisions were ambiguous, so 
as to dictate an interpretation in 
favour if the liberty of the subject. 
Furthermore, that conclusion did 
not involve the patient being 
deprived of his right to apply to the 
tribunal under section 66. so that 
the question of a breach of the 
European Convention on Human 
Rights did not arise. 

Solicitors: Alexander & Partners. 
Willesden: Le Brasseur J. Tickle. 
Treasury Solicitor. 


Regina v Oxen 

Regina v Bozat 

Regina v Kovaydn 

Before Lord Justice Evans. Mr 

Justice Scon Baker and Mr Justice 

Sedley 

[Judgment Juty25| 

Where, in recommending deporta¬ 
tion. a judge had failed to give 
reasons, the Court of Appeal could 
supply the reasons if a recom¬ 
mendation was justified. 

The Court of Appeal Criminal 
Division, so held in allowing in 
part appeals by Zervet Ozen 
against a total sentence of 12 years 
detention in a young offender 
institute and by Htkmet Bozat and 
Cafer Kovaydn against total sen¬ 
tences of 15 years imprisonment 
imposed On August 16,1994. at the 
Central Criminal Pudge Goddard, 
QQ for one count each of conspir¬ 
acy to commit arson with intent to 
endanger life and one substantive 
count each of arson with intent to 
endanger life, and against the 
recommendations for deportation. 

Mr James Wood for Ozen; Mr 
Michael C.rieve for Bozat and 
Kovaydn, both assigned by the 
Registrarof Criminal Appeals; Mr 
Mark Ellison for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE SCOTT BAKER, 
delivering the judgment of the 
court said that all three appellants 
look part in arson attacks against 
Turkish establishments in 
London. 

The trial judge had recom¬ 
mended that each of the appellants 
be deported but she gave no 
reasons for making that recom¬ 
mendation. It might have been 


that she felt that the circumstances 
of the offences were such as to 
make recommendations for 
deportation inevitable but it was 
dear from a line of cases, the most 
recent of which was R v Belaifa 
f The Times February 27.1996) drat 
It was imperative for the judge to 
spell out reasons for making such 
a recommendation. 

Recommendations should not be 
made as a matter of course but 
only after careful consideration of 
the criteria in fairness ro the 
defendant but also for the purpose 
of any appeal and from the 
viewpoint of the secretary of slate 
who would in due course have to 
consider the recommendation. 

He would wish to know Ihe 
reasons without having to try to 
infer them from the documents. 
Where a recommendation for 
deportation was not supported by 
reasons from the judge it was 
fiahle to be quashed: R v Rodney 
(CA. unreported. January IS. 1996). 

The question was whether the 
absence of reasons was necessarily 
fatal to the recommendation or 
whether the Cburt of Appeal could 
supply the reasons if a recom¬ 
mendation was justified. 

Mr Ellis on had drawn the 
court's attention to R v Baverstock 
((1993) 14 Cr App R (S) 471) where a 
statutory obligation to give reasons 
for passing a custodial sentence 
had been overlooked by the judge. 
That did not prevent the Court of 
Appeal from upholding the sen¬ 
tence for hs own reasons. 

Their Lordships did not think 
that Mr Justice Blofeld in R v 
Rodney by using the word “cru- 
rial" meant that when the trial 


judge had failed to give reasons the 
Court of Appeal was powerless to 
state its own. They preferred the 
reasoning in R v Baverstock and 
were satisfied that they had power 
to given their own reasons if they 
thought a recommendation was 
appropriate. 

Moreover, the failure tn give 
reasons did not mean the recom¬ 
mendation was unjustified. If it 
was justified, then it was im¬ 
portant that the Home Secretary 
should have die benefit of the 
coon's view. 

It was dear from R v Secretary of 
State for the Home Department . 
Ex parte Sanrillo ((1980) 2 Cr App 
R (S) 274) that a person against 
whom a recommendation for 
deportation had been made under 
section 316) of the lmmgiration Act 
1971 had no right in make 
representations nor to be heard on 
them by the secretary of state 
before he made an order in 
pursuance of that recommenda¬ 
tion. Nevertheless, their Lordships 
would expect (he secretary of state 
to require and consider representa¬ 
tions that offenders might have 
against deportation before malting 
his final order. That was of 
particular importance where the 
offender was serving a long sen¬ 
tence. 

The court made its recom¬ 
mendations on the basis of (acts 
known to it on the day of sentence 
but things might change and the 
longer the gap between the date of 
the recommendation and the date 
of deportation the greater the 
likelihood of some change of 
circumstances. 

The situation might have 


changed in the offender's country 
of origin, in his personal circum¬ 
stances. or those of his family. Any 
- such change might militate for or 
against deportation. 

Turning to consider the length of 
the sentences, the appellant. Ozen, 
was 18 when the offence was 
committed and had lived and been 
educated in this country since the 
age of 13. His parents lived here 
permanently. 

Their Lordships were satisfied, 
having looked at all the circum¬ 
stances. that his continued pres¬ 
ence in the United Kingdom was 
not to its detriment and accord¬ 
ingly quashed his recommenda¬ 
tion for deportation. 

The other appellants were more 
than 10 years older than Ozen and 
had shown themselves ready to 
commit serious crimes. There was 
nothing to deter their Lordships 
from making a recommendation 
for deportation in their cases. 

Since there was no evidence of 
any overt act on the part of the 
appellants, other than those giving 
rise to the individual's substantive 
offence, their Lordships thought it 
was wrong in principle to pass a 
longer, albeit concurrent, sentence 
for the conspiracy than for (he 
substantive offence. 

The sentences for the conspiracy 
would therefore be reduced Io 
match those for the substantive 
offences. In addition. Ozen* sen¬ 
tence would be reduced to eight 
years since youthful immaturity 
probably played its part in his 
involvement. 

To that extent the appeals would 
be allowed. 

Solicitors: CPS. Headquarters. 


Disclosing hearsay Terror sentence 


Regina v Law 

In deciding whether to order the 
prosecution to disclose informa¬ 
tion requested by the defence, a 
judge was not restricted to consid¬ 
ering only evidence that would be 
admissible in a court of law put 
before him by counsel acting on 
instructions. 

He was entitled to require to see 
additional material even if it 
amounted to hearsay evidence. 

The Court of Appeal. Criminal 
Division (Lord Justice Phillips. Mr 
Justice Jowiu and Mr Justice 
Keene) so stated on July IS in 
dismissing an appeal by Anthony 
Law against his conviction on 
February lb. 199b, at Isleworth 
Crown Court (Judge Connor and a 
jury) of having a counterfeit cur¬ 
rency note with intent contrary to 
section 16(1} of the Forgery and 


Counterfeiting Act 1981 for which 
he was sentenced to five years 
imprisonment and ordered to pay 
£2,000 towards prosecution costs. 

LORD JUSTICE PHILLIPS 
said that the trial judge had 
refused a defence request for 
disclosure of details relating io 
undercover officers or informers. 

On appeal it was contended that 
in making his derison the judge 
might have taken into account 
matters which were not admissible 
but their Lordships did not accept 
that a judge was restricted only to 
considering evidence that would 
be admissible in a court of law. 

It had to be a matter for the 
judge to decide what material he 
required to see in order to satisfy 
himself whether he should allow 
the disclosure requested nr not. 


Regina v Gaskin 

In deciding the proper sentence to 
be imposed on a defendant con¬ 
victed of making a threat to kill, a 
judge was entitled to consider not 
only the short-term terror caused 
to the victim but also whether the 
victim suffered continuing terror 
because of the threat. 

The Cburt of Appeal. Criminal 
Division (Lord Justice Simon 
Brown. Mr Justice Cresswril and 
Judge Allen) so stated on July 18 
when dismissing the appeal of 
Israel Tmy Gaskin against a four 
year prison sentence imposed on 
March 8. J996 by Judge Crabtree 
in York Crown Court following a 
plea of guilty to making a threat to 
kill. 

JUDGE ALLEN said that cases 
of making threats to kill posed 
difficult problems for sentencing 


judges. They ranged from threats 
made in the heat of (he moment to 
cases, such as the present one. 
where the maker of the threat 
caused the victim oft-going con¬ 
cern about potential danger. 

It was proper for a judge, when 
deciding what sentence was 
commensurate with the serious¬ 
ness of a case, to have regard to the 
facts of the threat and also to see 
whether it was a flash in the pan or 
whether the threat, although made 
at a specific time and in specific 
circumstances, caused continuing 
worry to the victim. 

In this case the judge dearly 
passed a sentence which was 
perfectly proper on the facts and he 
was entitled to look, as he did, at 
the full effect on the victim, the 
short-term terror and the fears for 
the future. 


Jurisdiction over foreign banknote patent dispute 


tin an application under section 

that in 1«9 a T^jqg, M for leave » Justice Davies in Becke i 

******* 

amember of the defendant was neither jpg® 

Tproo*! in ' 

JIS5?5sb5Ss SWfJSpWgs 

Is demonstrating 
mat a defendant to proceed 10 ^ 1 for 
the institution of which leave had 
teen given under section 42P) 

Sd ^ripply *0 - «* teve 

“cSrofed widi ^observations of 
Lord Justice Davies in Becker v 
Teale (at 


justice Ttiocey view that 

oceOgnaU ^"^^were 

a device or 5^8® 

SSS-SsW 

sft=Sstt 

BuiiheiYUineraftteb 9 ^_ 


vided a solid basis for affirming 
the judge's dedston. ... 
Morawr the judge's town 


“...the jurisdiction which is 
given by (section 42(3)) to a judge in 
chambers to give leave for the 
institution or continuance of 
proceedings by a vexatious litigant 
is a jurisdiction which should be 
very carefully and sparingly 
exercised." 

Last, it was important to 
emphasise (hat a defendant to 
proceedings for which leave had 
been given under section 42(3) 
would always have the opportu¬ 
nity of effectively impugning the 
leave by making an application 
under Order 13. rule 5 of the 
County Court Rules or under 
Order 18. rule 19 of the Rules of the 
Supreme Court. 

Lord Justice Roch and Lord 
Justice Schiemann agreed. 

Solid lore: Hooper & Wallen. 
Torquay. 


A Ltd v B Bank 

Before Lord Justice LeggatL bird 
Jusnee Motrin and Lord Justice 
Brooke 

(Judgment July 3I| 

The ooun had jurisdiction and had 
ihe duty to determine a dispute 
between parties in which the daim 
alleged infringement of the claim¬ 
ant* product* United Kingdom 
patent used in the manufacture of 
foreign banknotes, such notes 
being kepi for disposal and dis¬ 
posed of by a foreign commercial 
bank in England. 

The court was not being called 
upon to adjudicate upon, or even 
consider the lawfulness of the issue 
of the banknotes by the foreign 
country's state hank, nor was any 
claim made that might interfere 
with the sovereign functions of that 
foreign stare. 

The Court of Appeal so held in a 
reserved judgment allowing (he 
appeal of the plaintiff. A Ltd. 
against the order of Judge Ford on 
October 4. 1995. in the Patents 
County Court, whereby he de¬ 
clared that the oourr had no 
jurisdiction over ihe defendant. B 
Bank, in respect of the subject 
matter of the daim or relief or 
remedy, and set aside the service of 
the summons and statement of 
case on the defendant bank. 

Mr Jonathan Sumption. QC. for 
the plaintiff: Mr David Lloyd 
Jones and Mr Peter Colley few the 
defendant bank: Mr Richard 
Plender. QC, for the central bank 
intervening. 


LORD JUSTICE LEGGATT 
said that the plaintiff was the 
registered proprietor or a UK 
patent relating to the invention of a 
type of security paper suitable for 
use in (he manufacture of bank 
notes. The intervener, the central 
bank of a foreign country, had 
security paper manufactured in 
Italy, primed and issued as lhal 
foreign country's currency, which 
the plaintiff alleged infringed their 
UK patent, contrary to section 
60(])(a) of the Patents Ad 1977. and 
which the defendant bank dis¬ 
posed of in England. 

Because the rights conferred by 
the UK patent were territorial, the 
plaintiff made no allegations of 
infringement against the foreign 
country or the central bank. 

Mr Plender contended that the 
issue of bank notes was relevant 
because it formed (he kernel of the 
dispute: objection was taken to the 
English court adjudicating on the 
alleged infringement. Although 
the central bank could for the 

future alter any paper on which 
their notes were primed, it would 
be impossible to separate currency 
already circulating abroad, if 
proved to infringe ihe patent, from 
that circulating at home. 

His Lordship said that the notes 
were not currency, they were 
commodities. There was nothing 
to show that the central bank 
circulated ihe notes in England, 
and if they had it would not be a 
sovereign aa. No sovereign had 
the right to insist on circulating his 


bank notes in a foreign country. 
The case against the defendant 
bank in no way depended on 
showing that the central hank 
were party to any infringement 

Mr Plender relied on. authority 
to show that the court declined 

jurisdiction when it found that it 
was required to adjudicate on 
transactions of foreign states: see 
Buttes Gas and Oil Co v Hammer 
(11982] AC 888). 

The essential feature of his 
argumenr was that if the court held 
that the defendant hank infringed 
the patent, it would be holding that 
anyone else, such as the central 
bank, who did the same thing 
would similarly have infringed it. 

But in the Buries Gas case, as his 
Lordship held, the issues of sov¬ 
ereignty were raised by the defen¬ 
dants plea of justification and by 
his counterclaim. In the present 
case nothing was relevant except a 
comparison between the paper on 
which the banknotes were printed 
and the patent specification. 

The fallacy in Mr Plenders 
argument about non-justiciability 
was that adjudication on the 
plaintiff's daim would email no 
adjudication on transactions of a 
foreign state nor any inquiry into 
acts done in exercise of the sov¬ 
ereignty of a foreign state within its 
own territory. 

No sovereign aa of the foreign 
state in the UK was railed in 
question by the plaintiffs daim 
since there could be no drculation 
of the foreign state's bank notes in 


the UK as could amount to official 
action by the central bank. 

The notion that the keeping and 
disposal or foreign bank notes for 
commercial purposes in the UK 
should be treated as sovereign acts 
outwith the purview of the English 
courts was not only unattractive 
but was contrary to principle. 

If any notes were printed on 
infringing paper the central bank 
had only themselves to blame for 
any adverse monetary or commer¬ 
cial consequences (hat might have 
ensued. 

Mr Sumption conceded that the 
issue of currency by a foreign state 
was a sovereign ad. recognised as 
such in England for at least 300 
years, but the Issue of currency 
was not material in the present 
case. 

The relevant., acts were the 
keeping for disposal and the 
disposal in the UK of banknote; to 
which die patent was alleged to 
relate. Those acts were commercial 
banking transactions which were 
devoid of govern menial or political 
purpose. 

Second, they were not sovereign 
acts because they did not occur 
within the territory of the sov¬ 
ereign concerned: see Buttes Gas 
(p«3). 

They occurred within the terri¬ 
torial jurisdiction of the English 
courts where, if it did those acts, 
the goverrnnent of the foreign state 
would enjoy no immunity from 
suit: see section 7(b) of the Stale 
Immunity Ad 1975. 


Even if (he disposal of the 
foreign state's bank notes was held 
to have infringed the plaintiffs 
patent, the fad that they could not 
have been disposed of unless they 
were issued by or on behalf of the 
foreign government would not 
avail (he defendant bank or the 
central bank because the court was 
not being called on to adjudicate 
on the lawfulness of the issue of 
currency, nor was any claim made 
that might interfere with the 
foreign state’s sovereign functions. 

His Lordship said that since 
foreign bank notes were not legal 
tender in the UK they circulated 
only in the sense and to the extent 
that they might be bought and sold 
in the UK. 

In principle it was English law 
that determined what might be 
done with foreign bank notes in the 
UK. Were it otherwise, a foreign 
sovereign's right to circulate his 
hank notes in the UK would 
considerably impair the English 
courts’ right to regulate their use in 
the UK. and might even interfere 
with the sovereign prerogative of 
issuing currency in the UK. 

Nor could it be regarded as a 
breach of comity to restrain the use 
in the UK of foreign bank notes 
that infringed a LHC patent 

Lord Justice Merritt gave a 
concurring judgment and Lord 
Justice Brooke agreed with both 
judgments. 

Solidtors: Taylor Joynson Gar¬ 
rett Thomas Cooper & Slibband; 
Thomas Cooper & Stibi^ird, 


vS 


w 



- .W-- 


m 1 c millw 


xtf'ri <-tiirr>iinlrfor« nwrprt fin flies, it) SDeok Inr 27.4 per cent. 




38 SPORT 


the times TH WSD^UGL£TJ£19% 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Billington 
ignores 
the bruises 


Britons take giant leap for disabled sport 


NFWS TEAM INTERNATIONAL 


By Jenny MacArthur 


A BADLY-BRUISED Geoff 
Billington heads the line-up of 
Olympic riders competing at 
the SQk Cut Derby meeting at 
Hickstead, which begins to¬ 
day. The centrepiece of the 
four-day meeting is the Silk 
Cut Derby on Sunday, the 
richest and toughest show- 
jumping event in Britain, 
offering a £40,000 first prize. 

Billington, whose . sixth 
place in the showjumping in 
Atlanta was the best equestri¬ 
an performance by a British 
competitor, is nursing a 
bruised body — and ego — 
after being thrown from a 

novice horse while competing 
at a show on Monday. 

“The horse jumped into a 
double, then stopped dead. 1 
did a somersault over his head 
and poled into the ground like 
a tent peg,'’ Billington said 
yesterday. He has had treat¬ 
ment from a chiropractor and 
intends to compete in the 
Derby. He will ride Mancuso. 
the partnership having fin¬ 
ished eleventhth last year on 
the horse’s first attempt over 
the formidable Derby fences. 

Although his British rivals 
include Nick Skelton and 
Michael Whitaker, former 
winners of the event, the rider 
they all have to beat is John 
Ledingham, of Ireland. The 
army officer. 38, is attempting 
a third successive win with 
Kilbaha, the only horse to 
have jumped two double clear 
rounds over the course. 
Ledingham's resolve is all the 
sharper after his disappoint¬ 
ment last month when 
Kilbaha was withdrawn from 
Ireland's Olympic squad. 
Skelton, who won three times 
from 1987 to 1989. is having his 
first attempt at the Derby for 


three years. He now has 
Cathleea the winner of the 
King George V Gold Cup last 
month and a mare he consid¬ 
ers brave to tackle this de¬ 
manding course. He has built 
his own version of the notori¬ 
ous Devil's Dyke — Fence 10 
on the course — to practise 
over but says there is little that 
can be done to prepare for the 
famous Hickstead Bank with 
its 10ft 6in drop. 

Two notable absentees this 
week are John Whitaker and 
William Funnell. whose Der¬ 
by specialist. Comex, is in¬ 
jured. Whitaker, runner-up 
for the fifth time last year after 
a jump-off with Ledingham. is 
competing in the final of the 
Pulsar Grand Prix in Holland, 
where a £400,000 prize is on 
offer. 

His younger brother, Mich¬ 
ael, was also due to compete 
there but with his top horse. 
Two Step, recovering from tire 
back injury which afflicted 
him in Atlanta, he has 
changed his plans. On Sun¬ 
day. he will ride either Elton 
or Touchdown. James 
Keman's stallion, which has 
been lent to him. 

While Ledingham cannot 
break any records in the 

Derby this year {Michael 

Whitaker and Eddie Macken 
have both won three times 
with the same horse), he can 
do so on Saturday when he 
and Casdepollard attempt a 
fourth win in the Speed 

Derby. 

The oldest rider at the 

meeting, which starts today 
with the Silk Cut Tankard, is 
Nelson Pessoa, of Brazil. Pes- ; 
soa, 61. gained the first of his j 
two Derby wins on Gran | 
Geste 33 years ago. | 


Stephen Wood meets 
two women taking 
water skiing onto 
a different level 


I t is not often that Britain 
can lay daira to pushing 
back the boundaries of 
sport but two of the country’s 
most gifted water skiers mil 
do just that amid the rolling 
hilts of Lancashire this week¬ 
end. Vrv Orchard and Barba¬ 
ra Russell are poles apart as 
people but they have been 
thrown together by their re¬ 
spective disabilities and share 
such determination and hun¬ 
ger for respect that (hey only 
deal in innovation^ 

Orchard. 30. who has had a 
leg amputated, and RusselL 
blind since her early twenties, 
recently became the first dis¬ 
abled women to successfully 
land a jump in water skiing 
competition. That was at the 
British championships in 
June and, over the next four 
days, the rest of the world will 
have to take note. 

They are part of a 14-strong 
Britain team that will defend 
its European disabled water 
sluing championship tide at 
the Cowra reservoir, Whit¬ 
worth, two miles north of 
Rochdale. Britain has won 
the title four times in succes¬ 
sion and, with Orchard and 
Russell performing such re¬ 
markable feats, it is unlikely 
any other country will spoil 
the party. 

Most able-bodied people 
would find it hard to pluck op 
die courage to be pulled along 
at 55km per hour by a 
speedboat then jump off a 
3ft-high ramp ami land per¬ 
fectly in the water. Take away 
the use of one leg or the power 
of sight and the task beames 
all the trickier. 

Orchard, an exhibition 
organiser from Fulham, said: 
“My reason for attempting 
the jump standing on one leg 
is not just because 1 need 
personal respect but because 



RusselL who is blind, lands another jump during practice for the European championship this weekend 


I want people to speak of our 
sport in the same breath as 
the ablehodied efforts. 

_ “People say to me all the 
time how brilliant I am to be 
able to water ski but I wflj 
only accept any praise if it is 
worthy. It’s not amazing if I 
£uL it’s only worthy if I can 
take sport and my own 
performance, to new heights. 
That’s what it is all about” 

She lost her right leg in a 
train accident when she was 
17. “I was running to catch my 
train, tried to jump on board, 
but missed and fell down the 
side of the platform,’'she said. 
“It was unnecessary and I 
wish it hadn't happened, but 
you have just got to get on 
with your life. 

“In a way, more good has 
come of it because I’ve had 
the opportunities with water 


skiing, and some of my 
friends have never been able 
to do the things I have.” She 
had only “dabbled” in water 
skiing before her accident but 
her natural passion for sport 
has undoubtedly helped 


S he said: “Balance is 
everything when you 
go over a ramp with 
only one working leg and I 
wouldn’t be able to do it if I 
was not sporty or fit 
“The water skiing has tak¬ 
en over from my other 
passions, like hockey. With 
water skiing, I knew I could 
improve and improve the 
sport as a whole So pride 
does come into it some¬ 
where." 

RusseU, 40, from Bourne¬ 
mouth. was born partially 


sighted but lost her right 
completely in her early twen¬ 
ties. She never water skied 
before that, which makes her 
subsequent achievements all 
the more remarkable. 

When she is on the water, a 
guide skies with her until 30 
metres before the ramp then 
moves off leaving her alone. 
By then she should be on line 
and, if she is not. the conse¬ 
quences are not worth think¬ 
ing about. 

“It is the most exciting 
thing when my guide leaves 
me.” she said. “From then 
until I hit the water again. I’m 
in a world of my own — it’s 
like I’m suspended in time 
and I've lost myself. It is 
dangerous, but those few 
seconds are thrilling and why 
I was hooked as soon as I 
tried the sport.” 


Both will increase the 
height of the ramp in future 
competitions as they strive for 
greater recognition. For the 
moment, though, they are 
aiming to improve on their 
record distances. Orchard of 
7.6 metres and RusseU of 12.4 
metres. 

This year is the first time 
Britain has hosted the Euro¬ 
pean championship and, as a 
setting, Cowm is perfect, it is 
picturesque and calm, but 
today Orchard and RusseU 
will create the storm that 
should make the rest of 
Europe worry intensely. 
Some foreign competitors 
have already heard of their 
new technique and want to 
copy it hut cannot 

“The fear factor is too 
strong for them.” Russell 
said. 


^ IN brief >1 

Barbarians 

to be led 

by Roumat 

OLIVIER ROUMAT, the 
France lock, who has re¬ 
mained with Dax despite 
being linked with various 
English rugby union dubs, 
will lead the Bartemans 
against Wales in Cardiff on 
August 24. He become the 
first Frenchman to lead 
invitation team. The Barbar¬ 
ians. who play Scotland in the 
Dunblane international on 
Saturday, include two un¬ 
capped Fijians, Marika 
Gasuna. a flanker, _ and 
Aparama Bose on the wing. 

BAR BAHIANS: 

SStSTand Watesl. P SS 

AuMraEa). A Pehet {San ., ^ 2 ru li 

SIE&'&Z&b "£££» 

Roumat (Dax and capta»jLO 

Gorkery (Bristol and Ireland). A Pan* 
(Toshiba and New Zealand) 

Lendl tees off 

Golf: Ivan Lendl, who was 
twice a Wimbledon runner-up 
and who won more than £135 
million in prize-money in a 
distinguished tennis career, 
competes in the Chemapol 
Czech Open in Marianske 
Lazne. starting today, his first 
leading Tour event. The 
Czech-born Lendl, who is now 
a United States citizen, said: 
“My big ambition is not to 
embarrass myself." 

Henman departs 

Tennis: Tim Henman, the 
British No L lost 6 -2, 2-6.6-4 to 
the unseeded doubles special¬ 
ist. Marie Knowles, of the 
Bahamas, in the first round of 
the RCA championships in 
Indianapolis. 

Athens lines up 

Olympic Games: Athens, the 
dty that staged the first 
Games of the modem era in 
1896. yesterday submitted its 
bid to stage the 2004 Games to 
tiie International Olympic 
Committee at its headquarters 
in Lausanne. 


THE LEADING 


Pos Team (Raya's name)_...__ 

1 Eatons Gerais 2 {J Eaton). 

2 Scolfchre A (P Scha&ekfl. 

3 Eatons Goats (J Eaton).... 

4 Eatons Goals 3 U Eaton). 

5 SpreadEagteteMX |PStewart) 

6 Opportrewts4th XI (PStewart).. .. 

7 Opportunists 3rd XI (Slswarl)........... 

8 Katos Centers 2 (N Kab] . 

9 Csofine A (A Ludrfust). 

TO Teddy 3 (B Bear). 

11 The Tan Macttine IN Kafo). 

12 K P Alstors 3 (KR Patel). 

13 The Run Rats (Mrs L Tattoo).. 

14 Opportwists1st XI (P Stewart). 

15 Bowted Manlyn (H Paul). 

J6 Carokne 1 (A Lucfchusl) . 

17 Cheadfe School (M Roberts)... 

18 Caroline 0 (A LockhursJ). 

19 Watering Wonders [D Bart) ..... 

20 CaroSne C |A LadtusQ. 

21 Sr Utters (N Mansart). 

22 Tcmdge Tops (C Hubvt).. 

23 Fteds Team IR Price).. 


24 Heavens 5thX)(RJWai) . 

25 Comtans Bate 2 (0 Blackburn) . 

26 Sandech Stag (I Efc)._. 

27 Oteraey 4 JM urig)_ 

28 Tatrton A (J Hunt) . . 

29 Odfty 2 (M Long) . - 

30 Primesfart (CHotourt)... 

31 RuvanssB XI (W Rebanshan). 

3? ftc a rdo s Marvels (R WShtts) . . 

33 Barbta Rogers (JS Hut ch ers o n). 

34 Indas loosen (L Taftoo) . _ . 

35 MCM (M PoswaQ.. 

36 Holraates (M Ward) „. 

37 Ta)fs Tigers (J Short)... . ... 


7/ TBF. times ” 


39 Hrrt4St0.000A(JHurO. 

« G B s First XI (G Brooks) ... 

41 Oh Jtffy Six (M Long).. 

42 Perth Fnders A (P Stewart)... . 

43 Pamal Beaters (JS Hutchinson) 

44 Du* Donald (H Pail).. 

45 Lkely Lads {L Mates)__ 

46 John Hum X 1 (J Hunt)__ 

47 Martina McBride (S Vale)... 



48 Ortesy Three (M Long) -. 

49 The Runwfcks (J Davenport) 

50 AtSfly 1 (M Long). 

51 » Gfexfetorr (□ Frngfey). 


52 M J S Team 1 (R Stem).. 

53 Aiaturfcs (P Stewart)..... 

54 Webbies Wombtes (AR Howse)_ 

55 Johnson's First XI (RJ Johnson)_ 

56 Johns Bays 3 (M Jonas).. - 

87 The Oerters (T Hurt).__.. 

58 Hunt 4 SI0,000 E(J Hunt). 

59 Teddy Two |B Bear)__ 

80 Spire Thomas X (TE Webb). 

61 Wedn etda yshsa ft Kbbenfl. _. 

62 PJM1 (PJMead).___ 

63 Brooks Bmm Bunnys (G Brookes] .. 

64 Breakfast Boys (J Goodman) - 

65 Hunt 4 $10,000 F (J Hunt)_.. 

66 Sily Mid Mficksts (J Tracy)_ 

67 Stas Ware 3 (Z AD-.. 

68 Made Water's XI (A Wright). 

69 Have Bates Ol A Tme (JR Stanley) . 

70 Thtogy Bob (AZAGhari)_ 

71 Leatoer WBovre (K Bocsh) .. . 

72 Kims Krafarc (K Dowsed)... 

=73 {p After).... . 

-73 Jones XI Wonders (Dr M Jaseja) ... 

75 □ J N 6 (DJ Mead) —.. 


76 Bong Beck Botham (K Booth). 

77 Berne's Aflsarts 11 (3EHowes|._ .. 

78 Torridge Champs [C Hubert).. 

79 The Spoiled Dog (A Hibbetd)_ 

->80 Wig's Wonders (A W«tey-Jwws) . . 
=80 Sw Loves Other Sui (DA Jacfcscnj 

82 CeroSnes B (A Luckhura)_ 

63 Jones Boys Ore (ML Jones)_ 

B4 (RJ Hutchinson) ... . 

BS GT Old Boys (MA TroveO) ....- 

86 DeTs Demons (D Hoiterd)- 

87 Outstrip Edge (G Brooks)_ 

88 Webbies Wallies (AR Howse).. ... 

89 Heavens Fouth XI {RJ Wad].. _ 

90 Must Be Pay Day (F Panayfi_ 

91 Teddy Fora (B Spare)..... 

=B2 The Lynwood Lotties (D Tattoo)- 

=92 Qatoy ASstars 8 (5 Roberts)- 

94 Jones Boys Two (M Jones) 

95 O Danny Boys (DJ Hornsby] . . _ 

-96 Mies » (N Evans)...--- 

=96 EARLY BIRDS 2 (M Whtfey)__ 

=96 Amphsamre Kids (M Eves)_ . 

99 The Islanders (G Evans)_ 

100 (M Barham)___ 


- r ;pvr 


\ >:v 


The scores in brackets are the points scored in the last 
week; the other scores are the cumulative paints scored 
since the start of the season. The figures include all 
matches completed by August 12. Overseas players are 
shown in bold type, rising stars in italic. 

Player (No) Rune wide Total 

Batsmen (001-135) 

CJ Adams (001). 1223 (44) 0 

GFArdwr (0021.. 494 P 0 

MAArherton (003)_... . 752 ii2) t 

CWJAIhey (004) .... 807 (251 0 

MAzhanrddin (005).. 439 (ffl 0 

R J Bailey (006)_ 500 (0) 2 

KJBarnett(007)_ 978 (72) II 

M R Benson (008)_ 0 (0) 0 

M Q Bevan (009)-1225 (0) 4 0 1305 

DJBk*PeB(0lQ|. 653 (54) 13 (0) 913 

DABtenUron (011)- 296 (0) 0 

PO Bowler (0121_ 961 (104) 0 

N E Boers (013)_ 0 (0) 0 

A D Brown (014) . 403 (1) O 

D Byas (015) _ .... 772 (Ol 0 

SLCait*Jto*l (016)_ 892 (73) 0 


(0) 1223 
$ 494 
(1 772 

TO 807 
(0) 439 
(0) 540 
to) 1198 

(0) 1305 
(0) 913 
(0) 296 
961 
0 
403 
772 


Mjawrfijma) _ 


J PCrawley (021) 547 

C 0 Crowe (022).._... 0 

R J Curtate (023) ... 252 

TSCumsI0B4).. 617 

JADaleytp25). 199 

A J Dalton (026). 37 

RI Dawson (027).-. 79 

M P Dowman (028)- 88 

N H Fakbtolher (029). 513 

A FSntcfl (030)._ 2 

A Fordham (031)- 495 

D P Fliton (032).. .. 701 

J E R Grttan (033). 832 

M W Gatling (034).. .. 659 

NAGra(U35)-- 0 

G A Gooch (036).. .. 1318 

K Greenfield (037)_ 688 

A l-fctofc (038) .. 689 

J W Ha# (039)- 330 

THC Hancock (040)_ 657 

RJ Harden |041)_ 239 

ME Haney (043...- 0 

ANHayhuretfi*)- 224 

GR Haynes (044)_ 0 

DL Hemp (045).— 138 

GAFBck(ti46)- 99S 

AJHoiioate (047)- 1137 

N Hussain (0481 - . - 651 

S Hutton .-. 600 

kaz Ahmed (050). 534 | 

jnamam-ul-Haq (051). .. 651 

SPJames (062)- 1167 

P Johnson (053). 613 

DM Jones (054)- 1071 

VKamb*(OSS). O 

MKeechfOBG)- 615 i 

W S KendaSJ057)-- 574 i 

G J Kerrts (058)- 3 

WG Khrei (059)- 447i 

NVKniB«lO0O)- 839 | 

JS Lanay ftKIL.- «B 

M N Lethweli (ife) - 745 

S a Urn (063)- 1361 

DALflBtherdale(064). 328 

NJLanham (066) - 508 

J JBLavrfs (06*3. 157 

NJUong<P67)... 477 

G D Llovd (068)—.— 852 

J I Lorpgtoy (0601- 6 

M 0 Loye (070) - - 

g niaSn!£r^72)."is 

DLMaddy (073)- 708 

STSSSSff -.:- iSS 

A McGratfi (07tB . 857 

A A Mstcalle (D77)- 712 

A JMQfc to (078).. 758 I 
R R Montaomene (079).... 887 

T ** Moody (080)- 1175 

HMonfa [Ml).- 11® I 

J E Morris mzi . 410 

R S M Morris [083)- 195 

MD Moron (084)... 712 


NJLanham | 
j JBLawisK 

NJUongfl* 

G D Uoyd (M 
J I Lorpgtoy (C 
MB Loye (07 


K Newd (08SJ- 

TJG Q'Gorman (081 
DP Ostler 1087).... 
JEOwen (088) ... 
KAParaonsJpag)- 

TL Pwiney (t»0j. 

PRPb&sdKSI). 

J C Pootay (092).... 


.. 166 

(386). 326 

.. 785 

... 499 

4. 221 

.. 875 

.. . 6S5 

. 580 




The transfer One wA open at Bam each Tuesday and wfl 
dose at 6pm the following Monday. All transfers mule 
durin g thfe period wfflbe appfed to team s e l e ctors' teams 
prior to the commencement of the next fiiet-cisss match 
(transfer rimes may be altered sSghtty to accommodate 
scheckile of Ite-dess matches anapriar notification wg be 
published in The Times) Transfers may only be made by 
telephone by calBrtg 

0891 866 964 


261 
875 
655 
580 121) 


PJ Prichard (093)- 

M R Ramprakaah (094)._ 

JDRaKtfte (D85)_ 

DDJRobtosonflMSJ- 

P E Robnson (097)_ 

RT Robinson [098)_ 

ASRoOns (099)_ . 

M A Rosebeny (ICO)_ 

Sneed Anwar (101)- 

OA Shah (102)_ 

N Shahid (103)_ 

Sefrn Matte (104)_ 

DJ Safes (105)__ 

NS SHhu (108)_ 

P V Stantons (107)_ 

AStngh(IOB) _ 

B F Smfli (109). .. ..._ 

RASmahfTiO)__ 

N J Speak (111)__ 

M P Spaigttt (112)__ 

A J Stewart (113)_ 

I JSutcflOe (114._ 

A Symonds (116) . 

N M Taylor Mlig_ 

S R TovMar (117)- 

VP Tory (118)- 

GP7horpe(119).. 

SPTitchaa(i20). 

M E TiescotfJck (121)- 

T A Tweab (122)__ 

MP Vaughan (123)_ 

M J Water (124). 

T C WaJon (125).... 

DM Ward M26). 

TR Ward (125- 

A P Weis (128)_ 

RMS Weston (129)_ 

WPC Weston (130)- 

GW White (1311... 

J J Whisker (132)___ 

PRWhte#»p33). 

MGNWindows(134) . 

AJWhgtt (135)... 


All-rounders (150-203) 

Aamto Sohal (150)- 166 (U) 

M W Afeyne (151)_- 578 f62] 

I 0 Austin (152)_ 419 (40) 

PBarabrtdge (153)- 606 (6ij 

DRSrottn (154)- 498 <B3 

U ABtfCher (155)..,.._.. . 1345 (70 

CL Calms (156)_ 7S2 {78) 

D J Gapei (157). 658 (1) 

DG Cork (ism.-- SOI (30 

RDBCroc (159)- 400 @ 

KMCuran (103?_ 842 (94) 

A Date (161) . 422 (« 

PA JDeFrBtes (1B2)- 237 (2l) 

VC Drakes (163)_ 282 (2) 

M A Esteem (164) . .. 469 (O) 

S C Eccfesrone (T65)- 119 m 

K P Evens (168) -- 336 (23) 

M A Fetlham (167)- 14 (ft 

MV Fleming (168)- 746 MO) 

A P Grayson (169)- 772 (14) 

O D Gibson (170)_ 314 (13» 

F A Grtflllh (171).... 0 (0) 

C L Hooper (1725 - 87D (41) 

RCuarH(t73)-- 67S (8 n 

A D Jwtefa (174). ... 489 (TO 

K O James (1 Tv - 70b (02) 

BPJuflan07Q._.. 4S0 (1M 

J H KaSfe (177V.... 128 (rt 

SRLar**(ire)--- 568 W 

CCb9WtS(18(fl- 398 

GWWb (181) . 25 (5) 

AC Morris (tag... 189 (IB 

Muskteo Ahmed (183) _. 78 (26) 

.— 15 (°) 

DAFtos (187)- 35! (0) 


188 

235 
171 
785 (1 
675 

992 pun 
803 (103) 
497 (73) 
496 (123) 
841 (170) 
427 (0) 

680 111 - 
0 
707 
379 
1381 
700 
51B 
130 

835 ... 

123 (Si) 
186 (15) 
81 
867 
789 
27 
945 
235 
781 
397 
327 
415 


580 
934 
5QB 
554 
0 

1021 
784 
671 
832 
S3 
449 
208 
235 
171 

1485 
675 
992 
803 
487 
496 
841 
487 
980 
0 
727 
379 

1421 
700 
519 
130 

1015 
123 
206 
81 
907 
789 
27 
94S 
235 
761 

557 ... 

327 (33) 
415 (0) 


lies 

119 
816 
94 
986 
1032 
434 
20 
1270 
1415 
480 
1185 
1330 
248 
1378 

143E 
1078 
105 
2B9 
878 
3S 
821 
T193 
531 W 


XI Wonders [Dr M Jaseja) ... 13579 99 The Islanders (G Evans) .I 12 

S (DJ Mead)... 13577 | lOOfMBotham)__ 12 

- KE Cooper (305). S (0) 5 (0) IQS 

__ D M Cousins (30S. 0 (0) 0 (0* 0 

A P Cowan (307) 99 14) 21 (1) 519 

DM Cox (306). 226 (55) 23 69? C. 


A team selector may transfer up to two players In higher 
team per transfer period. Whether you are trans f erring ana 
or two players, your team must be rendered correct 
accordng to the formal of live batsmen, one aU-rounder, 
one wicketkeeper and four bowlers and including ana 
rising star and one overseas player (but no more than ana 
of either) by the end of the caiL You may check your team 
score and position in rTC by raffing the fTC check Gne on 
0891 774 779 


G D Rose (188)-- 

VSSoterto (139)__ 

AW SmHh (190) . 

N M K Srtto (191)_ 

PASmuh (132).. 

J N Snap? (193) . 

J P Sfeprienson (194)_ 

CM Totey (195)_ 

Waste Akram (198)_ 

M Wfektoson (197)_...... 

G Welch (198)_ 

CM Walls (199)- 

VJWtesCOm_ 

P N Weefces (201)- 

C White (202)_ 

JRWBeman (203)... 


Wicketkeepers (225-256) 


395 (58) 
397 (43) 
23 (D) 

436 (84) 

23 (0) 

167 116) 
540 (0) 

112 m 
171 (1^ 
390 (80) 
152 (0) 

580 (24) 


39 (3 1175 

16 jO) 717 

0 M 23 

29 (6) 1016 

2 (Of 63 

14 11) 447 


1020 (i 
252 f 
691 (7. 

790 (8 
852 0 


S 770 (84) 

1336 (lira 
(3) 1254 [11Q 


AN Aymes £225)... 

R J Btakay Sq __ 

K R Brown §27).. 

M Bum B2Bi . ... 

SPGrlfBtos (229)... 

WK Hogg (230)- 

P C L Hwa wy (231). —. 

J A 

K M KrMtSn (234).. 

DGCUgerTwood (23S).... 

C P Meison (237)_ 

P Moores p3Si . . 

N R Mongta (239) ... 

PAfteonp«5™.. 

W M Noon (241)- 

s7»wdte®!?.r.Lrj;;: 

R C RusseU (247)_ 

N F Sargeam (248).. 

CWSoon<249)_ 

A D Shat* 1250} _ 

R J TUrner (251)- 

L N Wafer (352) -..... 

R JWarran (253)- 

P Whfiflcase (2S4)- 

RC JVWnams (255).. 

S C WHs (256).. 

Bowlers (275-404) 

F R Adams (PS)- 

J A Afford (278)- 

U Afaaa) (277)- 

P Akkad (278)... 

CE LArnbross (279}- 

S J WAndrew C8Q).. 

Arte Jwwd (291)7- 

MC J Bel £283.. 

S R BartMCk £283).. 

S J Base P841-- 

RT Bates (28^_ 

jDBany (2&3).. 

M — 

M M Betts (290)_II 

M P BteknalCZaj)- 

S D BHrack £292.- 

DJPBo^npM) - 

MT|rteson^»i'I!!ir!II' 

JEBiWdeyja^..... 

S J E Brown (298)__ 

ARCaddUr^)..... 

R J OHpman (300)__ 

G Chappie [301) .. 

J H Oiids (302)__ . 

V P Oaks (303)___ 

C A Connor (304)- . .. 


582 (7) 

491 (0) 


306 (39 
382 <01 


53 Cl 
671 (64) 

384 (O) 

040 (C9) 

iGo to*i 

£ | 

687 (51) 

3! (8 

500 (9) 

0 (0) 
208 (0) 
120 ID) 

^ « 

-o 8 

133 (17) 
140 (7Q 


805 (50) 

B09 (l£*i 

260 (0) 

i^ ( i8 

$ 8 
2S9 id 
540 (21) 

^o *8 

1685 (102) 
1164 (124) 
120 ( 0 ) 


1175 (98) 
717 (43) 

23 (0) 

10 63 ^ 


KE Cooper (305).. 

D M Cousins (306).. 

A P Cowan (307) _ 

DM Co* (308). 

RP Davis (30EQ... 

J M De La Pena (310). 

NAOerbysteropit)_ 

RR Otodon (312). .. 

M Ormond (313).. 

A D Edwards (314)......... 

S WK Efis (315)- 

SEhvorthy (316}.. 

ARC Baser (317)...... 

ESHGkUnsPm ■— 

A F Gtes (319) . 

OGough (320). .... 

RJ Green (321)_ 

JCHaSeC (322) . _ 

G M Hamilton (373).— 

A J Hams (324).. 

PJ Hartley (325)... 

D W HcacJoy (328)_ 

JEHfedsonggh.. 

M *SSSi f33W - ' 

P W Jarvis (3321... 

RLJohnson(333).. .... 

G Needy (334)717 .. 

N U Kendrick (336)_ 

S G Kan lock (336) ... 

J ID Kerr (337). 

A A Khan (338).—. 

N KBeen 039)--- 

R J Kirttey (340)_ ._ 

A KUmbfe (341).. 

R P Letabvre (342). 

J Lews (343).. 

JO Lowry (344).... 

M J McCooue (345)_ 

O E Matoota (346). _ 

N A lAtltrOer (34/).. 

PJ Martin 040..— 

RSCMorwKfentans (349) 

R J Maru (360)_ 

SHUtamN.. 

D J Mfris (353)... 

A D MuMy (354).. 

T AMkrton (355).. 

PJ Newport (253) . .... 

R WNowail (to?).. 

J Ormond (356)___ 

G J Parsons (359) _ ■ 

MM Patel pm... . 

RM Pearson (3611_ 

D B PamaB (362). 

N C Pimps (383) .. 

R A feck (364)... 

ARKfeeraon (305)_ 

ACSPtaaitpaa)__ 

V J Ptio 067].. 

SLVRaju (368).. 

A R Roberta (369).. 

M A Robinson (370)_ 

I D K Safebisy (371).. 

J P Searie (374)... 

O J SracBtrt (375). 

K P Shae rot (37 g).. 

A Shertyar (377) .......- 

K J Srtne (370).... 

CEW Stverwood (329) .... 

GCSmoVOaO) _ 

AMSnvth (381).. 

O J Spencer (382) - - 

JSrtnadi (383).... 


3 S 

99 (4) 

226 (55) 
198 (43) 

2 a 

? <9 
1 10 ) 
0 If!) 
0 ( 0 ) 

£ M 

tao (9) 

55 (4) 

218 (19) 
472 (0| 

14 to) 
0 (CT 

75 (a 
381 P 
188 

’2 I 

319 (0) 

IS *3 

35 (0) 

eo y 

38 (S 

112 raj 

119 (9 

113 $ 

314 (1) 

94 p5) 
31 (0) 

139 (ij 
20 (A 

137 (Ifl 
1B0 Kfl 
327 (17) 
150 (9) 

n fa) 

142 (0) 

28 fcn 

216 (SI 
222 (31) 
134 (28) 
27 (0) 

s & 

195 (13) 

0 ( 0 ) 

0 ( 0 ) 
33 CT 
141 vh 
0 ( 0 ) 


EJ Stanford (384). 12 CT S (01 112 (O) 

R D Stsnp (385). 2S3 to) » ® 833 CT 

P M Such peg.. 128 (3 55 (13 1228 (24fi 

J P Taylor (387). 178 (d 42 ® 1018 (80) 

S D Thomas (38tfl.. 199 (17) 20 (3) 59? (77) 

J B Thompson (389)_ 88 (0) 9 (0) 269 (0) 

MJ Tlusfield (390).. ... 67 (0) 5 (pi 167 (t) 

H R J Trump (381)_ O (CD 1 (0| 20 (D| 

A J Tudor (30?)__ 0(0) 0(0} 0(0} 

P C R Tulne* (393).. 160 (13) St (611180(133) 

SDUda){394)._._ 385 pS) 27 905 (138) 

APvenTrooct09S)_ IS (4) 7 (*i « M 

C A Walsh (386)... 79 (O) 54 (0) 1159 (160) 

A Water (307). . __ 0 (0) 0 (1? 0 tol 

A E Warner (396). 0 (® 1 {3 * 0 

SLWaftnCtffl).... 97 fffl 41 TO 917 m 

Waqor Yaunfe (400). IS (7) 19 TO 338 «7) 

NFWIfetm(401).... 195 (11) 19 f»l 575 (31) 

J Wood (402)._ 97 [6) 56 0 617 |46) 

TNtthn(4d3)^... 15 TO B TO 1^(1^ 

G Yates (404)_ 5 TO 0 TO 5 TO 

□ One port Is awarded tor each run. 20 points tor each wfcteL 
wickets include caSches and EtunalngE tVMritakccnra. but no* 
catches by Beiders. □ Source. TCC&PA Cnchst Round 


5 (0) 105 (Of 

0 TO 0 TO 

21 (1) 519 (24i 

23 (IQ) 686 (255) 
IB (4) 558 (123) 

0 TO 0 (0| 

1 (0) 20 TO 

2 TO 41 TO 

0 TO 0 TO 

o TO o TO 

10 (1) 231 (37) 

25 (3) 784 (77) 

33 (3) B40 (69) 

48 (3) 1015 (64) 

39 TO 998 (179) 

43 TO 1332 (0) 

6 TO <34 (0) 

o to» 0 TO 

4 to) 81 TO 

36 TO 795 (0J 

47 (0) 1321 (0) 

34 (1) 668 (39) 

o to o (oi 

1 TO 34 TO 

o to o to 

36 TO 1039 TO 

33 TO 938 (13) 

19 TO 544 JO 

16 (7) 456 (155) 

13 |T» 321 (Of 

17 (0) 375 TO 

3 TO 120 (4* 

'll TO 258 (4g 

6 (3) 127 (67) 

13 TO 372 TO 

18 (2) 479 (46) 

38 TO 873 (Ol 

51 TO <334 (121) 

61 (Iffl 1314 (2^ 

31 (4) 750 (Bit 


48 (1} 1287 £37) 

53 Ol 1210 (49) 

18 (3) 451 (1231 

19 TO 522 TO 

2 TO 68 TO 

0 TO 0 (01 

33 TO 876 TO 

30 p) 822 (91) 

26 (1) 654 (48) 

7 TO 187 (0) 

5 TO 200 (D) 

7 p 206 (0) 

32 (3) 835 (73) 

□ TO 0 p 

0 TO 0 TO 

5 p 133 TO 

10 TO 341 [0) 

0 TO 0 TO 

22 (4) 829 (113) 

13 TO 354 TO 

6 (0) 132 to) 

S iSI s I 

1 TO 23 TO 

23 TO 481 TO 

31 (0) 740 TO 

34 TO 864 to 

11 TO 259 (0> 

41 TO 10^1 P 

20 TO 528 TO 

S (0) 112 TO 

2B TO 833 TO 

55 (12) 1228 (245) 

42 TO 1018 ran 

20 (3) 589 (77) 

9 TO 268 (0) 

! n s 

0 To 0 TO 

SI TO 1180 (133) 

27 (5) 905 (138) 

7 (4) 155 (84) 

54 (0) 1158 (160) 

0 P 0 (0) 

1 TO 20 TO 

41 TO 917 TO 

16 TO 338 W) 

10 (1) 575 pT) 

26 (2) 617 (46) 

! 8 17 5 ^ 


_ BASEBALL _ 

AMERCAN LEAGUE: Baltimcre 4 HMwau- 
kee 3; Boston 7 Toronto 5: Crvcsgo 8 Now 
Yonc 4: Tens 6 Decent 2: Caraomra 4 
Cleveland 2r. Mrerasota 6 Oakland 2; 
Ses»e 9 Kansas Cay S. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Atlanta 2 PhtedeJ- 
prua o (first game): AOanta 5 PhDadelptife 2 
l second game). Florida 5 Cotarado 0: 
Cnsvraii 10 San Drago 4: Montreal 7 
Houston 4. San Franasco 12 POsbugh 10: 
Chnago 3 New York Z Los Angeles 8 St 
Louis 4. 

_ BOWLS _ 

LEAMINGTON SPA: Woman's world out¬ 
door championships: Sfogtas: Seventh 
maid: Group one: J Undoes (Scot) bt W 
Ire (Eng) 25-19; C Howard-WaamsGim) 
bt M Taylor (HoB) 25-10: B Anderson (Bots 
ta L Ttoisuva (Fiji) 25-19; M Johnson Rrej 
St M Swadknv (tart 25-22: M Vasquez (Ara) 
bt JJoubert (Nam) 25-14; J Howat (NZ) UN 
Ismail fMaO 25-19: M Bums [Ken) bt R 
Banares (US) 25-23; M Lite fa ml bt D 
Parnate (Cook Islands) 25-21 Group two: L 
James (SwaSbtJ Peacock (5A) 25-21; LK 
Ohuk (PNG) bt M Porter (W Samoa) 25-14; 
A Nwate (Can) bl R Pereira (Sing) 25-10; C 
Anderson (Norfolk Island) bt W rang (Aus) 
25-21; A Staon (Gueri br N Yo*molo 
(Japan) 25-1: A Chau (HK) bt D has (Sp) 
25-10 Sfegtes: Eighth round; Group one: 
Smdow bt Banares 25-18: Psrnri bt 
Vasquaz 25-13; Line M Joubart 25-14; 
Undores ta TVaasuva 25-17; Like bt Howat 
25-11: Anderson ta Johnston 2S-13; (smaS 
bl Howard-WBCams 25-24; Taytor bt Bums 
25-19. Group two: Andaman bt Ives 25-9; 
Peacock b( Jones 25-10; Mvala bt Jamas 
25-11; Ssnon bl Stead 25-20. Pons U 
Chow 25-21; Fong bt Peraria 2519. Fours; 
Seventh round Grocro one: South Akkra bl 
Malaysia 50-3; Israel br Holland 33-11; 
Swaziland bl United Sutee 17-15: Scotland 
bt Ireland 24-22; Zambia bt Sln^pore 25 
23. Cook Islands bt Hong Kong 20-17; 
Kama be Bcaswena 21-19. Group two: 
Auarafe bl Wales 29-18; Canada M 
Western Samoa 29-13; Aigenena ta Span 
22-21: Nanba bt New Zealand 26-13, 
Norfolk Island bt Guernsey 17-14; Jersey bl 
Japan 29-11: India ta RJ 22-19. Bghth 
rawx± Group one: iretnd tfi Botswana 30- 
10: Cook lEfende bl Sfegapjie 20-15; Souih 
Akkra bt Zsmbfe 2515; United Stales bl 
Malaysia 29-20: England bt Hong Kong 24- 
14; Kenya bl Holland 27-15: Saaland br 
Swraafend 1516. Group two: Fiji ta 
Namibia 1511: Marie*. Island bl Japan 30- 
7; Wales bt Guernsey 24-13; Australia bt 
Spain 24-9; Jersey bt Papua New Gunae 
21-15: Western Samoa bt India 38-13 New 
Zealand ta Argentina 33-8. 

CRICKET 

SECOND XI CHAMPIONSHIP (final day o( 
three): SoOi* Sure y 138 end 284 (6 j 
KenrSB 8^; WmtcWira 272 (K J Pipv 99: 
RWNowofl 5-44) and 155-1 (A Singh 61 not 

oTO- 

LOMBARD WORLD CHALLENGE 
UNDER-15 CHAMPIONSHIP: Groin A: 
Wrist inctes 187 (M Sanuels 55, S Gangs 
55): En^and 188-7. 

NAYC COUNTY FESTIVAL; Oiesfwe 144: 
Lsrcesfershte 145-5 Bedfordshire 155 (M 
Hasaman 71); Yorkshfee 158-2 (A Bourive 
69, C Wbriers 58). Durham 233-4 (H Hifober 
64 net ml I Jones 50 noi ate; Lincolnshire 
134 Northamptonshire 137; Cumbrta 138-3 
(A Read 92 not out). OHordshire 187-7 (S 
as 52); Lefoster 183-9 1 

FOOTBALL 

Tuesday's tea rasidts 

Sccttsh Coca-Cola Cup Saoond round 

Atadrle 3 Rotth 2 (aert; 2-2 after 90minj 

Brectin 0 Htransan 2 Dundee 2 Dwifoar- 

Wn 1: East FUe 1 SI Johnstano 5. FdkkK 2 
Aitaon 3-. Groonod, Morton 1 Harrrton 1 
feet. 1-1 at 9QTVn; Greenock Morton won 4- 
3 on pens); Kimamock 0 Ayr 1; Motherwell 
0 Aloa 0(asi;ABoa won 4?on pens); Par- 
bde 3 Forfar 0; Queen's Parti OAtranfeen 2 

ajOran 4 Berwick 0: String 1 Qundoa 
umevz. 




CRICKET 

Britannic Assuranca 
county c ha mpionship 
11 0, ter day of tow. 104 overs rrmtaum 
DE RBY: QerOyshlre v Nottfngftjnsfvre 
BRISTOL: Gtouceslereferei v YortcstVm 
CANTER BURY:iK art v Somersel 
OLDTRAFFORD: Lancashire v 
Hampshire 

LORD'S: MMttasax v Worcestershire 
EDGBASTTW: Wawfckdiire v 
Glamorgan 

Tetley's ChaBenge Series 
IT 0, second day of three 
LEICESTER; Leicestershire v PaWstanc 
Tour match 
I l&tofcty affair 

CHESTHTLE-STREET: TCCB XJ v South 
AlncsA 


PRE-SEASON MATCTCS: Aldershot Town 

1 MBwsfl 1; Altrincham 0 Huddersfield 0. 
Dagenham and Redbridge 3 Layton Orient 
3; EnMd 2 Bounemouth 3; Northampton 3 
Arsenal 1; Ncrthwch 4 Tnmmere I; 
Maidenhead United 0 Mfealdstone 1; 
Manchester Untied 0 Hsnazionato 1. 
YflLKNSON SWORD LEAGUE CUP: Sec¬ 
ond round: Ards 0 Crusaders 3; Baitydare 

2 Cteagh Town 4; Cotertene 3 Qenann 2 
tet; 2-2 at 90min); H and W Wrikfan 2 
Csmcfc 3 (aet 1-1 at 9Qmin); Portadown 2 
Newry 1: Loughga* OLMMd 5. 


LfTTLESTONE: British boys' dnmpton 
ship: ThW round; M PBangton (Nefynlbr. 
HopWn [Pyle and Kerflg) 2 and i; J Rose 
(North hfents) br C Bang (Mitton) 7 and 6 
P OTtanneS (Sand Mcwr) bt I Robensor 
(Wrist Hfarida] 3 and 2: S Chapman (S 
Enodoc) bt M Vafan (Swit) one hole; . 
Cockcroft (kteison) br J Sharp (CowaQ J 
and 4; A Mate (Sp) bt A ward (Whdringtor 
Heath) 5 and 4; C Peterason (Sure) bt U 


(Newcaste 5 and 4: S Home (TuHaBani b 
P Dtrton (East Sussex NMfona) 3 and 2. C 
Cox (Wanfagton) bt L BoxaH (Wrist Surrey); 
holes: S.Garela [Sp) bl P Kyteuwn (Fin| ‘ 
and 3: M Baderm Sure) tx J Bel 
(Renishaw Parir) 6 and 4; R Donovar 
(jJantrisant) bt S Momson (DuUaturt 4 are 
3; C Roeke (Genards Cross) bt R HacSei 
(Canons Brook) 2 hotes: 0 Wbcon (Enmon 
Park) btJ Edwards (Knowte Park) 4 and 2: £ 
Yoreig (Seascala) bt A Raynor (Dartmouth 
3 and 1:0 Cole (Henbury) bt R Qurtra (Sp 
at 19th; I Panrafay (Durham City) bt i 
rtjghes (Catokoss) 1 hole: P Rows (Wes 
ComwaH) fat P Bradshaw (Gainsborough) £ 
and 4; L Orofvmfc (Broadstorra) bt □ Foster 
(Brtdportl 5 and 4; M Cempbel 
(Stacfcaown) bl A Dicite (Gerl 1 hoSTj 
Urton (Middfesbrough) W A Lynch (North 
amptonsh ro County^ at 20tn; K Fenie 
(AfamouTO bt J Hendry (Elgn) 1 hole: C 
WAams (Qrtspiau) bt R Dee (Orsstl) 5 are) 
jl. _ M . (Forfitaj bt L Dalton 

(Waterford) 4 and 3. F McLaughtan 
(Wh haw) bt S Buchan (Royal Aberdeen) 1 
hol^A irtuchod (Swtef bt M Water 
(Garionh) 8 and 4; N Tldder (Romford) bl □ 
KjrtonfWorkay) 3 ato 2: K CBtfe (Sattron 
Wakfon) bt N Burrows (Mrchrtiiampton) 6 
aid 5; C Ntisson (Sweden) bt D Oarks 
(ftchrrrand) 1 hole; A Delves (Padeswood 
and Buddey) UCGH (Exeter) 3 and 2. 
FORMBY: Brrihh girts home In te m a lfcmaf 
^ampjonsfep: Scotland 8 Ireland 3 
^ Fowsomes: L Mollat 

and O Chewfej 7 and 6; F Prior and A 

ffissea.'iissffiKi 

"W.’fi*: P»***«y tot fo smyft b 

^a^r 3mdi - 

_ hockey _ 

VUGHr. Ho**nd: Four Nations Undar-2i 


RUGBY UNION 

PORT ELIZABETH: Tourmtect- 
Prownce 23 New Zealand XV 31. 

POOLS DIVIDEND 

IgffiSKrS&dB 

awavr 1 * 

12 Mama s £2 50 10 eways El ,3s 
chance: 24pta 

homes void SI 
£1320. Li*5y rxrtwre 10 34 31 


*COND UNOSV 
g^fouOWorc 


msvor COUNTC! 
•toy °l hw)- Stone: 
NAYC UNDSLii 
•wHtab (at Oxft 

OTHE 
g gWA- Wome 
^ am P*or^hips (Le 
CrtajNG :SkySp 

®^WAY: Prsrr 

^«onvf 


r 





































































Vr 




THE TIMES T H UR , nAY 

RACING: 


AUGUST J5 1996 



SPORT 39 


__ P- U ijg^gHTRAjt\J E R AIMS TO EXTEND RECORD OF INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS 

Weld excels as man of the world 






b>oi Ir1rish Racjng 

L-ORR£s PONDliNT 

SAFE in The knowledge thai 
another insh trainers' title is 
ft*® 1 * all but assured 
Dermot Weld's horizons for 
the remainder or the season 

Zagreb’s surprising but 
stuimmg Budweiser Irish 
■ in June complet- 

«1 Weld s Irish classic eollee- 
n ™' “ U E with possibly the 
strongest team of horses he 

w ^ d n WeId is iuoking 

abroad. Responsible for Gn 

B *i l T nt Slakesi 

m 900 and Vintage Crop's 

Me/boumeCup triumph three 
years later, he has yet more 
foreign targets in mind. 

On Sunday week, last year's 
Lnsh Derby runner-up," Defi¬ 
nite Article, will face the 
starter tni the Arlington Mil¬ 
lion in Chicago. On the same 
card. Pro Trader and Dancing 
Fred go fo r the grade one 
Secretariat Stakes. They are 
simply the early representa¬ 
tives of an ambitious autumn 
agenda. 

Zagreb has the Pnx de 1'Arc 
tfo Tnomphe in Paris as his 
objective; the Irish Oaks win¬ 
ner, Dance Design, has sound 
prospects in the Breeders' Cup 
Distaff at Woodbine. Toronto: 
the Queen's Vase winner, 
Gordi. is being aimed at the St 
Leger at Doncaster; and the 
evergreen Vintage Crop is set 
to run in the Melbourne Cup 
for the fourth time. 

Weld's impressive record of 
forays abroad mean each of 
his runners will be feared, 
whatever the opposition. In 
Uie light of the poor record of 
British-trained horses in ihe 
Breeders' and Melbourne 
Cups, how does the 48-year- 
old Irishman get the elusive 
balance of travel and perfor¬ 
mance so consistently right? 
What does he do differently? 

[That's for me to know," he 
said, but images of mystical 
Irish wizardry are off the 



IRELAND'S GLOBETROTTER GOES TO THE RACES 


Weld's stable 
Curragh 
Rep of Ireland 


vT\ 


n 


V ri\k * 


j October 2ft Toronto 
\ Dance Design 
j Breeders’ Cup Distaff 


August 25: Chicago 


- — , ■ 

t 



September 14: Doncaster 

Gordi 

St Leger 

=55 




October 6: Paris 
Zagreb 

r r Prix d e I’Arc de Triomphe 




mark. Concentrating on the 
seemingly minute details is 
what counts. There's nothing 
magical, no magic formula, no 
must dos or don Is." he said. ”1 
tend to have the horses' prepa¬ 
rations done before we go 
abroad, so we're not depend¬ 
ing on getting a horse ready 
when we arrive. It's about 
keeping the horse fresh, men¬ 
tally fresh.” 

TTie results speak for them¬ 
selves. and not only the high- 
profile victories. Three years 
ago. Osman, the winner of a 
humble Galway maiden, fin¬ 
ished fourth in the Secretariat 
at Arlington, in front of Colo¬ 
nel Collins, placed in three 
European classics. Weld con¬ 
siders Pro Trader and Danc¬ 


ing Fred to be better than 
Osman. 

“Both are superior and that 
gives me hope," he said. 
"Definite Article is in good 
form and. depending hnw he 
runs in the Million, may stay 
in America for the Turf Classic 
at Belmont two weeks later.” 

Plans are also being kepi 
fluid regarding preparation 
races for the other sta ble sta rs. 
but Weld is excited by Za¬ 
greb’s potential. "He may not 
have a prep for the Arc, but 
whatever happens about this 
year's Arc 1 think he oould be 
awesome as a four-year-old. 

"Zagreb has outstanding 
potential and is maturing 
well. He is an easy horse to get 
fit so I'm noi worried about a 


warm-up race for the Are. 
Dance Design may go in the 
Irish Champion Stakes, but 
the Breeders’ Cup Distaff over 
nine furlongs in Toronro is a 
definite end-of-year target/ 
With the pace they go in 
America a horse has to stay 
well and she proved that in the 
Oaks. 

“Gordi has had a slight 
hold-up and may go straight 
for the St Leger. I can see him 
running well in that race. We 
see him as the ideal replace^ 
mem for Vintage Crop and he 
could go all the way." 

The schedule for Vintage 
Crop, first seventh and third 
in the last three renewals of 
the Melbourne Cup. will be¬ 
come clearer next month. "It's 



2.15 High Cut 
2.45 Supreme Star 
3.75 Celebrant 


THUNDERER 

3.45 Greatest 

4.15 Russian Music . 

4.45 DAWAUB (nap) 

5.15 Consort 


Ourtlewmaiket Correspondent 2.15 SUMMER BEAUTY (nap). 
4.15 Wizard King. " 


GOING: GOOD TO FIRM 

DRAW: 6F-1M. HIGH NUMBfflS BEST 


TOTE JACKPOT MEETING 
SIS 


2.15 BROAD CHALICE MAIDEN STAKES 

(Dm 1:3-Y-O: 61212yd) (11 runners) 


101 

in 

004) 

nr: 

19) 

30 

103 

(5) 

0 

IW 

1*1 

00 

105 

110) 

03 

106 

(3) 

0 

10F 

0 

2-2 

100 

l6l 

30 

TOT 

(7i 

005432 

no 

(B) 

3-24 

n 

nu 

5 


Paul Eddery 
. J Quinn 
. G Hind 
. T Soap 
.. J F Egan 
RCcdraw 


OIM COUNTRY THATCH 14 (Mrs B Sinner) C Nocgan 9-0 
30 MDDAY COWBOY 7 (3 Kami) fi Hnml 94 „ . ... 

SAVWG POWER 33 (The StobterBKfii ? Hanfc 94. 

00 SflVERBBB COURT 63 (WhtaHys (tang) DCteppel 9-0- 

03 STACIsATTACK 20 (B TOmnofl P ffefito 9-0- 

0 ZURS 30 (Btaflotd Rnjroid*ra<te) Mas G Kefcwr 9-0 - 

J-2 H6H CUT82IJ SmiT) I felling _ ...T Gum §8 

30 PRESS ON NICKY 65 IS MPSyndxalB) Iff Mito 0-9-Dane OM (3) 97 

0QM32 REDSKIN LADY 14 (WMaxnM lim| D Dsealh W .. Pal Eddery 07 

3-24 RUWY64iHMIMNun)CBrntadM -- WCarcan 97 

5 SUMMER BEAUTY 21 (S Hate) J Beaten6-9..-lfWd 97 

Sc77wa- .’-J Summer Braft. 11-4 mfi&tMIta. 9-1 «dfey Cota*. 10-1 tehfa Ufly. lM Press On 
Ncn 14-1 Tin. 16-1 other. 

1995: POLAR OUEEN 6-11 6 Ftart (5-11 J Rosden 13 fan 

FORM FOCUS 


94 


MODAV COWBOY 85il 3rd ol 15 to High Stmnjf 
in iterate! al Warwick (71. good Id firm) » powj; 
nutefflfl. will SAVING TOWER 9SI 10ft TUB 
O'-I M, ri 20 10 Kettoi tnnuitei a Neatwy (1m. 
itKj to tsnA. HK5H CUT 31 2ndU13toferaW« 
mnwteiaiHaviloticn.goodiosoO). PRESS DM 
IBCKY 2*41 3rd d 16 to Poetoy tn mantel a) 


Gontand (71. good) on penuflinate start RH> 
SKIN LADY 212nd dI 76 lo Hightad Rhapsody m 
■Wien him (61. pood id firm) HUWY 6! **i of 7 
to Titeulhr tn mate to Yarmouth (71. ftm) SWA- 
MfR BEAUTY 6>J 5th ri 12 10 Valla m mantel to 
Sandman (1m. oood to tom). 

Selection: HIGH CUT (nap) 


2.45 VIOLET APPUN CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP 

(£3.158:1m 6f) (8 runners) 

™ (6) WKEfifl SUPREME STAR 12 (COF.Gt U Wteari P^"“PJ 
>02 8 243615 MPffBSAM 19 (B.GI (Mis C Fararterl J ®»4po 34-5. - ’ 

1 2 fesafiffiisarife:.:--. sag 

j<-, sinere 1 9 g 5 ; DISPUTED CALL 6-1-8 U Heny (6-1) J «Wv-«me8 f*r 

FORM FOCUS _ 




GU1DETO OUR RACECARD 


103 (12) 00432 GOOD TBJES 74 |CO.BFJ.GSi .Ite D Ffe&nscn! 9 Halt 9-10-0 . B Wes) (4) 88 


Raocad ii/nba [haw m Orzizk So-Sgiae 
(t*m (F —(ell P — piifeiJ ifli u — oneaix 
rttfor. B — hcujtt down S—sirped m 3 — 
/efetal D — Hone's max Cays 

ana 1^1 ouwg. j if jtnpv F e Os 'E — 
bittai V — Mar H—ftxd f— c,b.1i£s 
C — awn* winner. C — ioJara »:ar«. —— 


ouw and iitoia sire,. BF — beaten 
fj.oume m ass ran). Gong Dn wWcti horse has 
«n (F — fan. qaod lo tarn hard. G —goad. 
S — sofLgoodliaii y). Owner u tuadffiE. 
Taxer AgpjEfnagtt Rider ptes xif aftowanse 
The Tm*; Pr.a* Hanioaptf i ralmj 


3.45 TOTE BOOKMAKERS HANDICAP (£6.026 im) (14 runnersl 

®1 (9j 31231-2 AU40WJR0CMU'CD 2? G.Si :T =^ng,; D Hamson 91 

462 ill) 100210 Lflii CLAIRE 13 iCOF.Gl .1 Lere: ^ =«* :-S-a .. S Santera 96 

403 (5) 634211 SAIEIMH IS A: J ?J”?| i-9-1 W Canon 95 

404 HO) 0-00434 CONSPICUOUS 19 lV.F.G> -'Vrarons, L CnraB 6-J-l .. . . JClUMt 96 

405 (Bi 3110 VICiORIAIl ST-lf 15 |D.9F.r.Sl W AMetei 4 3-9-1. T Sprate 94 

406 (131 04U10 CATCH THE LIGHTS 15 iCO/.G) " xmaBii fi Harmct 3-9-0 Dane ONed (3) 98 

(3) 0-06000 COMANCHE CW.PA’OON 16 iD.f.G5) T Tte^rean 6-8-13 . Paul Edday 94 

(71 035 PHONETIC 38 <ULz 9 'i«e‘ 5 3ac«g 2-8-7 . . .. S DfOWte W 

(1) 60-0004 TONH DE Ctld Id iC9.F) •• dftyj A tUmf 3-8-6. T Oum @ 

(4| 120-020 BRKHTBN ROAD 4Q |3Fit U Saigaotf) G Baiiteg 3-8-6 PPttiphyrS) 90 

(01 214.45- SHAMROCK FA21419 (r) •9 Bniiani ltU Hoi'ingdon *-6-8 . W Woods - 

(2) 00-3044 PRIZE PUPtt. 54 if) ;5 fefci •: Wall 4-t-E . .Pal Edday 98 

413 (14) 0041025 GREATEST 30 lORPi.G) ibwSir*i 0 KMea»; 5-7-10 MalJn Dwya (5| W 

414 (1?) 060546 SUMMEHH1LL SPECIAL 31 |D.F) lUra H tknfeW' Ur ? DuffteW >7-10 C RUQer 96 
Long handcap: ScrmatnH 7-' 

BETTMG: 5-2 Sateemah. 3-1 yrrcrt) fbci. 7-: Lilli Cbm S-1 Catch The Lights 10-1 Vlflaian Stjrfe 12-1 
Rem De Cool. 14-1 Conspiaimc 16-1 :tfwr, 

1905: HORN DE COOL 4-S-:2 T Oumn i9-’i r tiehra-3 8 ian 


407 

itSt 

409 

410 

411 

412 


FORM FOCUS 


ALMOND ROCK hi 2nd pM fl » Star ttaragei r 
handioc at Santtwn ilqi good) 11LI CLAIRE 
heal Mss Rhwa 1‘4I n 10-nmtei handicap at 
Newnoriet (71. good) SALEEUAH heal famua 
3WI it 5-nmw hsulicap at LingfiflM lit i40fl 
torn) CONSPICUOUS about 51 48, pi 12 n iuci 
it handicap d Ascot dm. good tn (mm. VICTORI¬ 


AN STYLE * 7ft o# 11 to Rsrab ffl tewifap at 
Goodeoad dm 11. good to Iami CATCH THE 
LIGHTS beat tfinstarpa ned in 64uma hantftap 
at SandiMO (71. good id firmL BONN 06 COOL 
attoul ?l 4iji ol i/ m Ataurr Ctne> m handicap at 
Goodwood (1m good to Rim). 

Sefeuwn. SALBldAH 


4.1 5 WHITCHURCH CONDITIONS STAKES 

(£5.112:61212yd) (8 Turners) 


SUPREME STAR AoU 6t 6ft of 9 •IfflfE 

(n at Sandom llm 6l gDd to 

m fennw hanficap to Fotteste* ( ,m 4,1 
Handicap to Wndso (tm it 135yd. goftfl CR»T 


ST WttEHT M 4th *14 to .SP" « 
imdrcap a) Kampton (1m 41. pww lo JO w) 
»«RMN6 HU 2nd «IW » 
c® al Epsom (1m 41. good) STRERL WG FELL OW 
3 2 nd ol6 to OU School House m handicap al 
Bz&i (2m 1I.JWS to ftm) 

S flWhtw SUPTOtE STAR 


3.15 TATTERSALLS MAflJEN AUCTION STAKES 

(2-Y-0: £3.262:60(13 tunnefs) 

■ BKSSSa’SW’- 

6 SSfflS SSS ijS!mu t '-• 

•> rn rnflANT 17 iCtearejev Fart Stud) R Hftwto 6-> — 
n IWX 35 a IWtoll P Mftn « 

...m-JESSS"--"- 

14-1 1995: HURTLEBtRRY 74J M hwy 17 2) Left 10 w 






FicJ 




pg 






rg 


rj 











PaolEtktey 
C Runo 
Dane ONeJ (3) 
.... PaiEddwy 
CUuxSay 
T ttrnr 

. JPEoan 
5 Sandais 
AUcGtow 
T Sprate 
Main Dwyer (S) 
... JOidW 
.. WCareon 


83 


«V® GffliWRGER^Ig JMJ”kK 
Concerto m mdder S wtel m mantel 4l 
MARK HW “J'*Jf sPlY JET '»«' 

mantel to Ntfunston w 


form focus _ 

WARLET CRESCSfT 21 3rd UtfU OF MAGIC 
ol 7 to Head Ora Heel! m maiden to 
glia randrUj.DHZ»tH.LV4’4l4h 
g^rl^to WarmcL (71W » P™^ 

GBL fit 3rd » Dm BUN# 


k.. 


SAUSBURY 
BEVERLEY . 
YARMOUTH 
N. ABBOT! 




tdalkjprS' D Loder. 3 winners trom 0 

™5Sf»‘wiS* N wfcto - 3 ‘T 

fSj Gosden. 11 wn f- 
27 & Lord HunOm^on _15 (r^ y 
23 8%: J hn»»- 7 7 *gSt 1 ' 

RChartic 10 - H l ,0fn 71 

.rvudPVS- Dane O'NhI*. 12 ««“ 

Sj^sswaass-s 

gSS.,^.1^ 


501 

502 

503 
MM 

505 

506 

507 

508 


0123-51 WICARD HHG 11 (DJ.G.3) |A Al IWJoum) M Pisscoh 5-9-10 . W Woods 93 

315040 LOCH PATRICK 12 (F.fi5l rite E Collar* U Uad^ncF 6-9-9 JReld 95 

3-1 LCWIY LEADER 46 (D.F) (5 W841 R Hmm 3-9-0 - . Dare (TNeffl (3) J7 
3-12332 WJESIAN CPSC12 (□ F| i5ewn» Heaven! Ste G 3-9-0 R CKhraw Eg 
40-1330 BEWITOONG 16 [CJ371 iP Coibyi J Tolto 3-8-11 _. . - S Sander: 97 

004)600 BRIEF GLIMPSE <6 IB.D/.G) (Wtwewr- feong) D Otspprf 4-9-11 W Canon 98 
36213-4 1R1A KEMATA 131 (DBF S) (Hesnurat aBjO) J [Wap 3-B-10 .. T Oumn 88 

1- POLSKA 327 (G) (S*e^ OLodo 38-5 . . PalEditey 92 

BETTING: Evens Worn 5-1 Rtsw" Uusk. 7-1 Bewilthmg. 8-1 Lonely lutte. M Polska. 10-1 Tiu 

lanan. 12-1 Mhon 

1995: KMGHT COMMAhOER 3M2 U Rooens (100-30/ R Hanon 6 ran 


FORM FOCUS 


WIZARD KING beJ Chnkamcka 51 <n 4-nmna 
conditions race a Cheste (7L good to ten/ LOCH 
PATRICK about 3M 4ih to Evcningwlonnance n 
listed race to SandOMi (Si good lo -Ml LONELY 
LEADS! beto Presm Gencmlicn 2SI in 8-unra 
nwtei al Chepstoa (71. good lo firm) 


RUSSIAN MU SC l»l 2nd ol 9 lo Hammerdejn at 
Goodwood lint firm) BRIEF GLMFSE 81 9f> ol 
14 lo Thrilling Dav u Icted race at Goodwcd (71. 
good » Srmi POLSKA beto 7ameem ihUAscol 
l» good) 

Scteciion. WIZARD KING 


4.45 FRESHWATER HANDICAP (£4.159:61) (16 runners) 

601 (21 0120 CROSS DE VALOUR 13 (Of) (P DaU»,i J Tods 3-9-17 - 

602 (5) 8-33231 LA PETITE FUSEE 35 (Di.G.8) lU Bewni 3 0‘Stolnra 54-1' 

603 (HO 100-263 PURPLE FLKG 35 AFjGtfS Uounyi L CoBek 5-9-10 . . 

E04 (13) DMXE5 PAWT n BLACK 21 (B.G| |U Petcod) R Harren i-9-9 - - 

60S i6| 0-54523 NLHSHARPA 14 (W) ;T Holtmd-Manm) J FwSura 3-9-8 

60b |11) 500385 MASTER MHIHfLD 7 (OJ£l lJ Hdi) R feta 4-9-7. .. . 

607 (IS) 21-2545 TRORDtS 23 ID.Sf.F) (2 WheehoiMl P Matei 3-9-4 

608 (14) 0-00312 WW7E SETIlfR 14 (F) iJ Newntti R Hodge; 3-M . . - 

609 (3) 0400-00 UASRtf 14 (D.F) (E Ftow<l I Inefrew jmkj 4-9-2 

bio (9) ©4041 WHSQStf WOOSTER 14 (C.0.F.G.SI P ttjfphy 5-9-t 

Ml {61 120404 SIDNEY END 16 (D.fl (M LVer.l M Charaw 3-9-0 . 

812 (12) 230045 DAWAUB 14 (D/.G) IJ Brown) (i Harm Jones 6-8-13 

6U (16) 0-44 AZWAH 40 IH Al MaMota) P WsNryn 3-8-11 . ------ -- 

614 (4) 006)3-6 CHU tCJGHTS 27 tV.D.G.5) (B Anentoiougn) 6 6-8-f P P Maphy (5) 90 

615 II) 103114 P08flER22(CD.BFi S)ih Fra The Cfai)ttsP[Utietd 4-8-6 ANlWBC4K* (S) S3 

61b |7| 00484)0 BRIGHT DIAMOND 110 (1 Stuhbmgs) J AiiioM 3-6-4 C Rutter 95 

EjETTNG £-1 kurchaipi. C-1 La Pelie ?us«. '-1 WMflme Wocrjfl 8-1 Pant I Bbd. 10-1 CruJS 01 Wftf. 
12-1 (Mine Seta. 14-> omen 

1995 LAW COMMISE40N 5-9-11 U Roberts (14-1) C nsworth »2 w 

FORM FOCUS 


S fendare S5 
i . D Biggs 97 
.. . JOutei 34 
Dane OUe* (3) 37 
j Reid. 97 
R Cochrane 98 
D Hamson 95 
1 Sprakc 96 
.. TIW6 88 
SDnwne S 
. AEdttey (7) 97 

._ Paul Edday 95 

WCtoWd 98 


CR0S5 Of VALOUR 3«l 2nd ol 5 to Syla Paia- 
( W m hantoeap to Yjmoufii 161 . Bmu on penulli- 
mtc sltot LA PETITE FUSEE beat Ansethun 'll 
n fennnei conduon: race at Chepstoa iGX good 
loEimi MASTER MALftLD afioul 1--.15ft ol 10 
to Artful Dane In ttmtoq al Baft llm. good id 
ftn.) WHTE SETTLER 2*1 2nd ol U to Spun 
Prtncez. to hanJcap tee llm. good to wmi 


WW50ME WOOSTER Deal Zrida Zonk 31 n i«- 
nuns hmdicap hem (71. good to firm) rah 
NUNSHARPA Bfc Oete OH) W 3m ST0NEX 
END 4'*[ 4Ih of i to Royal Dome in conltUore aa 
to terateir (57. good to tom) POKIER beto 
Rebellion hi m il-nmer handtap ora enuru 
and distance (good to turn) on paultiinale SOIL 
SetodHL CROSS Of VALOUR 


5.15 BROAD CHALKE MAIDEN STAKES 

(Div II: 3-Y-O P3,?62- 61212yd) |10 (unners) 


220203 ALPINE HDEAWAY 40 (Us M Sieslmi B Itanbunr 9-0 
53 ALRAYYW 13 (H Al lAMaumi J Gotdai M _ . 

0 BOLDER SHU- 31 (Ura J WWlrmfi) R FWI.pi 9-0 
2 CONSORT 121 % Aodallal C Hai»ood 9-0 
0 UGHLY SPWTED 1" fCorta; Rk- 1) N Lampaid 3-0 . 

5 RMERBOURNE 145 (Ur W Cm*) M Chmm 9-0 
500602 SEA DANZIG 11 iP Lot*) Jatog-M 

NHMAT1QN (BtandtonJ TteBaWi'Ms. 1 J late 8-9 . 

D RAPID RETREAT 12 01 y Ma^oumi E Duntop 8-9 
M SANDPIPER 87 ill EmffOH h Cunmngham-Brawi 8-9 
BETTffG. 6-4 Aliayytt 1(00-30 Alslns Hidtawv. 7-2 Canmt :£M Farahoume fepid teiof 14-1 humaHon 
lb-1 DOteD 

1995. POLAR QUEEN ;-:i C Hmj (5-H J Sd'.dcn I? ran 


13l 
(9) 
<11 
lb) 
14) 
IT) 
(71 
(5; 
18 ) 
(lOl 


..... M Rknaw 
WC*5M 
C (tuner 
T a*m 
. TF«ai7) 
P P Mmphy (5) 
. D Hanson 
S Sander: 
JFWd 
. CUunday 


FORM FOCUS 


ALPWE HDEAWAY SI jffl ol 7 to Bate-' Etox m 
tunbap to taydeft ibi. good) AlRAYflH E^-i 
3id ol 7 to Ron) Resuli si irwHn at Thn> i im 
good to tom). CONSORT M 2nd ol 12 w SandaU 
ii maiden al FoOetotm* (7!. good i; 5rmi 
RIWBOURNE 10SI 4th el 15 to Green Bsmec m 


maatei to DoncaHer 461. sod| SEA DANflG n«* 
2nd c4 6 la rme; ut TimB in handic^i to Ltogfield 
(Cl good lo lam) 

SANDPIPB1201 Wt dl 18 In Cttv i3uel v maiden 
to Windy* dm 67«L good I 
SeteJm. CONSORT 


beyond belief lo be running at 
that age. but don't tell (hat to a 
horse like Vintage Crop." 
Weld said. "He’ll run in the 
Irish Leger again and that will 
tell us whether or not to go to 
Melbourne." 

From the Curragh to Aus¬ 
tralia, one end of the globe to 
another. Vintage Crop has 
made the Melbourne Cup an 
oprion for European stayers, a 
preposterous idea until only 
recently. “We tend to be paro¬ 
chial and want to be best in 
our own country, but the 
racing world is getting much 
smaller," Weld added. Before 
the season is over Weld may 
have made it even smaller. 

Obituary, page 19 


Deauville 
prize lures 
British pair 

By Our French Racing 
Correspondent 

CHARNWOOD FOREST 
and Gothenberg carry Brit¬ 
ish hopes in the group one 
Prix du Haras de Fresnay- 

ie-Buffard Jacques le Mar- 
ois over the straight miie at 
Deauville today. 

Godolphin's Chamwood 
Forest, the winner of the 
Queen Anne Stakes al Royal 
Ascot and second to First 
Island in the Sussex Slakes 
at Goodwood, will be ridden 
by Lanfranco Dettori for the 
first time. 

The colt’s former partner. 
Michael Kinane, who step¬ 
ped in while the dual cham¬ 
pion jockey was injured, 
rides the unbeaten Fal¬ 
mouth Stakes winner. Sen¬ 
sation, for Criquette Head. 
Gothenberg will be ridden 
by Jason Weaver. 

Along with Sensation, 
France’s main hopes are the 
Irish 2,000 Guineas winner. 
Spinning World, and 
Shaanxi, the mount of 
Masayoshi Ebina. Shaanxi, 
successful in the Prix 


RICHARD EVANS 


Nap: SPINNING MOUSE 
(5.35 Y’armouth) 

Next best: Znrs 
(2.15 Salisbury) 


d’Astarte over course and 
distance earlier this month, 
is ridden by Ebina at the 
insistence of the filly’s own¬ 
er. Teruya Yoshida. Ebina 
has partnered her in big 
events in Japan this year. 

Kinane has also been 
booked to ride Simon Dow's 
WakeeL the top weight in 
the Handicap de Norman¬ 
die over a mUe. 

Geoff Wragg’s Sasuru, lo 
be ridden by Michael Hills, 
and the Godolphirtowned 
Wall Street (Dettori) take 
their chances in the group 
two Prix Guillaume d’Om* 
ano over ten furlongs on the 
same card. 

Big-race field 

Going: good 

3.05 PfflX DU HARAS DE FRESNAY- 
LE-BUFFARD JACQUES LE MAR 
OfS (Group I £131.752: Im sir) 
(Drumeisj 

312 Chamwood Forest 
S bin Suioor |GB) 4-S-4 l Dettori 7 
335 VetfwuD A Fatre 4-9-4 O Pedef 3 
001 Shaanxi E Letouche 4-9-1 

M Ebina B 

414 Le Triton Mme C Head 3-8-1 1 

F Head 9 

310 Gothonbarg M Johnston (GBl 
3-8-11 J Weaver 1 
111 Grey Risk P Demercastel 

3-6-11 S GuMot 2 

216 Spinning World J Pease 3-8-11 
C Asmureen 5 

1 )2 Zarannda A De Roytt-Ouffp 

S^6GMc«e6 

111 Sensation Mme C Hoad 3-8-8 
M J Kinane 4 
9-4 Sensation. 5-2 Spinning Wond. 
4-t Shaanxi, n-2 Chamwood Forest. 
8-1 Le Triton. 12-1 Zarannda, 
16-1 Grey Risk. K-i other. 


BEVERLEY 


THUNDERER 

2.00 Brodessa. 250 Sleepless. 3.00 Tertkan. 3.30 
Euro Sceptic. 4.00 Saunders Wren. 4.30 Poly Moon. 
The Times Private Handieapper’s top rating: 

3.30 EURO SCEPTIC. 



GOING: GOOD TO FffiM DRAW. 5F. HIGH BEST SIS 


2.00 TOUGAVa SELLING HANDICAP 
(£3,014 2m 35yd) (9 runners) 


(7) -312 
(9) 0012 

tn -ate 

141 0000 
IV 0084 
to oca 

16) 1355 

taj ooo 

IS -002 


BRODESSA BiCOBFJlUnUfa-JfcYiO-iW! ADareg ^ 
FAUGtROto 11 1 D.SFJ^S) H Tata 7-9-n L Ctemort d 
RDfllSLWUT ?1 5 Sz.-p 4-9-2 . lnBW*xS(7) - 


G3ff5C FCUH 8 .&) Its L Kuaa 5-9-8 
EV£RFRt8CS9flta^4^S 
6 HEY SONATA 75P > ESeirctn W7 
DOTS DK 21 (FjjaraSrr 7-6-1 

OWSLAIA 96 T Lwnflj 3-7-1D —__ 

NO MORE HASSLE 17 Vra W 3-7-1D NCafiste 92 
5-4 Bnxferj. 3-1 Fagom 5-' Daz 3u 6-1 Ba U=r Kc-Jp 3-t oshts 


KFaflon 98 
Albdor 97 
UBrati - 
U Birch 98 
fcfeGBEOl B3 


2.30 EUROPEAN BREEDERS FUND WESTWOOD 
MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O i^es: £3.626.5i) (9) 

1 (31 BWCA N£RA D Lxs J-U KDstey 

2 til CAUTION Us J«ta=J3’S-:i . .. KF*m 

4 |J1 H6UA Z Boom 8-11. ... ... . L CturacA 

« It) imflAKIWIB&aiCtfcbicMi . DMcXnan 

5 «si 43 tWVASHA20J5er>8-Tl . J Carol 

6 l7[ 2 SLEfftfSS20 N Eftoara J-11 - WRSMrtun I 

7 (91 3 SOlfEGOTOSOM3eJ(5-H.. _ UFenton 

e I8i S0fcETHWBUSTfctown5.il GDufMO 

9 (5) CO SIM5PeuOW5HH:n.lwea;e-11 F Lynch (3) 


B0 
56 

2-1 Blau Ml i-i fartete: 5-1 Seised, tei nrij. 8-1 ^uion 18 -I gw. 

3.00 RAPID LAD HANDICAP 

(£5.540 im II 207yd) (10) 

1 lit 2205 TEJmiM 5 KLfl 4-1841 JCjnol 96 

2 iiOi 230- VIWlAL0032UQr.&5)JLHm!*-:C^. wflSrtntuni 88 

3 I 2 l MM OHG AltCLStA.*! 19 \DJ) i VJttTci S-9-10 G DutSdd 94 

4 (5f £5! HAZARDASUESSO AletOeates « 

5 (Si 0360 ABtOWMG 14 (Gi 3 KWfitC 5-5-17 A Oart « 

o iH 2011 DAflLJKiCU} , .'S?4.caF)Drjlter)4-6-2 .. H Date-/ 93 
7 tit -202 MAID FOR BAA£YS 8 *4 JtfTSSi 1 WJBarc, 

b (81 5(03 FANYtWfiS IS iCI'/l Its; ferctom J- 6 -? A felon 
9 i4) otKo ocurriA i: iclf.gi v x k . . . ufmoo 


91 

_ ___ 9B 

in 2412 KAAFVt HOT.TU 15 (D.F.G.S) *J Ci^-tr, 5-3-3 G BtotMt 95 
7-2 Coring Dera. 4-1 JJu Fo Saite.c, -viato S Guts J-2 M3hh Hcfnm £-1 
Fauywn*.. 8-t King Amectar 12-1 7elect. 


3.30 EAST RIDING YEOMANRY CHALLENGE 
TROPHY HANDICAP (Amateurs: £3.254: 71100yd) (7) 

(1) 5624 FAME AGAIN 13 (D.3F.G5) !AS J feosflen 4-12-0 

Mu E fencOED <4) 88 

(7) 1201 TMKLERS FOLLY £ (DJ.Gl Denrs Smlh 4-11-3 1 5bl 

MrjsUCttjnH) 84 

3 (3) 0400 KHATIaT 081 (D.S| J A Hvnsfc-ii-1 G Woottranl |7) - 

4 (6) -306 POLLY PECULIAR 105 (G.S) B Snan 5-10-6 

Miss V Manful I (4) 86 

5 (5) 2301 CEE JAY-AY 10 (CD5.G5) J 6?ry 9-10-D |£a) 

MraiPeaet 87 

6 |4j 2621 EURO SCEPItC 3 (B.CDJ5) 1 Eietotoy 4-9-10 

Mss A Dnd (4) §§ 

7 (7) 5000 BREEZED WRl 63 (CJ)J=.G| B Csnuogg 10-9-7 

UoHNocran |4) BO 

3-1 F*n» Agan 7-2 Tiraden folly, 4-1 Ctt Jay-Ay. 9-2 Eua SatAs. 5-1 PoOy 
Prolix. 10-1 WaSto 25-1 Brnod weir 

4.00 H0LDERNESS PONY CLUB CLAIMING 
STAKES (2-Y-0: £3.241:51) (13) 

1 (4) 0 OIIO fiOYALE 10 P rtfc«n 9-2 _ . J Fortune - 

2 P DC DUBIOUS GOOSE MWEasterby 9-2 . Dafc Giaon - 

3 (8) (EDO NOT A LOT BMW Eatatsy 8-12 . . . . G Partfn (5) 91 

4 (91 THUE PERSPECTIVE J Sefiidl B-12 . . GBtodMl - 

5 (131 03 H GOOD IKK MMtl Ebltety 8-11 - L Qtvnocfc 88 

6 (7) 4381 PERPETUAL 10(G)UPiescoU 8-11 ... SDrfteM 88 

7 (5) 0301 SAUCERS WCN 24 (CDJ.6) UraLSWta 8-11 KFftOA 9 

B (101 D SKYBB TRYER 12 Rwta Thw^san 8-11 MCmafeo - 

9 (1) R ttOTCYS GAMBLE BBfen») B-8.. _WUrf - 

TO (6) 6 RUSTY 16 JBeny 8-5 .. JCarato - 

11 (1U 000 SIRAVAN029 B Bwgh 8-3. NCtoHB - 

12 P) 0053 THEYWamWEIDffiGOttqdM3 .. JUwe 85 

13 112) 0 JUST TYRGAL110N letter 7-11 NnTHdef - 

11-4 Strata Wren. 3-t PerptoiBl. 5-1 MX A Ld. In Good fidt. 6-1 attars 

4.30 PUNCH AND JUDY NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-0: £3,620:7! 100yd) (10) 


1 (4) 1203 GRATETMES9 (05)E Weymes9-7.. .. GfbffWO 

2 13) 21 Plft 33 (E] D Uoriey 9-7. J Canto 

3 (10) 31 FOXES TAIL 24 fl)5) ttss S HaB 94 . NCaSUf 

4 (6) 0644 SKELTON SOVERBGN B R HoflKhead 8-13 F Lynch 13) 

5 (5) 4354 RORMAII (B0 Mn J Ftanw)en8-11 .. . KFtoon 

6 ( 1 ) 4504 FLOADNO DEVON 17T Eas&rtfy8-5 - UBXdi 

7 (#? 6325 aOWWWGffU.24(BF)MGra*o8-4 LCtmod 

8 (9) 3241 POLY MOON 22 RLS) U Onmon 8-2 ... F Baton 

9 (7) 4001 SPARKY B (BJF) M W Eastraby 8-2 (5e» (We Goan 

10 (2 5165 RONS REVENGE 23 (COJ) U Ryan B-1 _ G Banted 

4-1 Pm. 9-2 Pdy Uoon. 5-1 Fhmng Devon. 6-1 Soartv. 7-1 ftvww. F«ej 
8-1 otav 


YARMOUTH 


THUNDERER 

5.35 Spinning Mouse. 6.05 Courageous Dancer. 

6.35 Rehaab. 7.05 Perfect Bliss. 7.35 Croft Pool. 
3.05 Charlsse Dancer. 

Newmarket Correspondent 5.35 Spinning Mouse. 


GOING: GOOD TO FIRM 

DRAW; 6F-7F. HIGH NUMBERS BEST 


SIS 


5.35 24TH RUNNING OF THE BUTTON BROTHERS 
HANDICAP (Ladies race: £2,385: Im 6f 17yd) (8 runners) 

1 202D LUCKY COM 33 (F}P Haring r-11-7_tfes A EmbOttOS 5 

2 3523 MtZYAH 8 (CDJ.6) JBafcB-lt-r .. IHSEdiHfy6 

3 MS CW7ME>T5CH0Cft3(F.S/r4aer.MM Its DKtUweSS 
A 2130 a TOUDOR 15 ff.fi) C Allen MO-13 Efts J Soaraters 1 
8 0521 5WWWG UDUSE 9 (D.F) 0 Money 3-10-9140] 

Mss 0)303 Jones 2 

G 0006 DliAAN 7 (B.Gt VI Haggas J-10-7 . . kfiss L We 7 

7 0662 NOSEY WTIW 5(C/ 1 JPearce 3-10-3 UraL PearceS 

6 2554 BRESL 11 (Fj t. Burtr 7-9-9 .. . Iks H Swfflng (3J 8 

f-2 Sprang Uotca 11 -4 r4L->ai 3-1 Diittoi'; C?»x 7-? Nosey ruiiie. 10-1 
Oieai 0 YDteto i2-i pans. 

6.05 DAM GATE LIMITED STAKES 

(£3.828: Im 2121yd) (6) 

1 4432 6LATAXT OUTBURST 2G IBF) G BPWY 5-9-i W R SxsiBini 6 

2 0400 CZARNA 16 IS) C &Wan 5-9-3.. . . J Gotobed (7) 5 

3 0506 COURAGEOUS DANE SI 34 IG) B htrtuy 4-9-0 J Sta* 1 

4 1051 DHAMUT1VE 22 ID/) J IWIi i-i-12 U Hanra p) 2 

5 2124 4LAMBAH 26 (F| P Wtoayn 3-8-10 K Daley 3 

8 -030 ANNECY 36 H C«cd 3-8-5.W Ryan 4 

3-1 AUnoi. 7-2 Dnwan.e CsuagMic Cisco 4-1 Coma 9-2 3taoni 

Outtaa 8-1 Armey 


6.35 ANGLIAN WATER HANDICAP 

(3-Y-O fillies: £3.927. Im 2f 21yd) (9) 

1 -345 SEFOT6 FORTUNE 15 JFjnsfam 9-7 . NKvtey(3lS 

2 3430 DfclARA 15 H Cc&l 9-7. . . . WBvanl 

3 01W) STATELY DANCER 12 ID/) G Wragg 9-5 W Woods 2 

4 4444 P0SSES5IVE ARreTE 21 U Soft M . WR5«iflum3 

5 Zi REHAAB 17 (Of) a Sinx 9-3 . SWImranh4 

t -430 NAVAL GAZER24 |Gl DLnder 9-3 DR UcCX* 5 

7 0-00 BALTIC DREAM 38 If) » ftta 9-3.G Cadet 9 

8 4148 CLASSIC BAUfT 36 IC.F) R ftwr, M A Uartay 6 

9 1630 TEMPTRESS 12 (D/.S) P Wtonyn 8-1? K Dadey 7 

:-i Rtfadi 3-1 Cnua. S-i Scdwrj Fomm. tentM AfWfe S-i rtovsi tot. 

10-1 CteEit tout i?-i Tenures M-l otas 


7.05 SIDEGATE PEUGEOT MOTORS H 
NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-0. £3,438 61 3yd) (7) 


1 2106 OUR KEMK G (B.D.G) S McAiriiffi 9-7 . 

2 1580 AZTEC TRAVELLER G ffLF.G) U Ryan 9-5 

3 1204 HSHRCTKWl3(CBFJ)DCnsguwW 
4112 PERFECT BISS 3 ID.Bf.FI P Bnn 9-1 . 
0010 S4.VHT SPH114 (Vfi J 3»?n 9-1 

IflNCa 


. DRMcCatK6 
- W Ryan I 
Utetui Dwyet ff.) 5 
JFEgan3 
UFenTai7 
RHught52 


6 630 BATTLE GROtMD BO'rf CaUghr 9-0 . 

7 4004 SHGFWfDURSUPPEH9GMagaraon8-12 . . AMxtay4 
S-2 Paled Bus. 3-1 hsh Fulion. 9-2 SmjjftiiwuM«*f. 5-1 On 7-1 
3*m Scdl. 16-1 Aacc Trjrefi*. 20-1 Bank Grama 


7.35 GREAT YARMOUTH STEEL 
CONDITIONS STAKES (£5,110 6f 3yd) (10) 

1 6110 CYRANO'S LAD 12 (DJ.G) C Pwya 7-9-7.... 

2 3233 CROFT POOL 16 (O/.G) J Uwa 5-9-0 . .. 

3 60 M0NAA3SB 35 (bh E Dulop 5-94). .. . 

4 2/D- PRWCELV KUSH 455 (D^) H Bdl 4-M .. . 

5 00-U SHGEYEV15 (Df.G) A htmm 4-9-0 

6 2554 KAFR ALUAYDAN19 (D.BF.F£5) J Dtrtap 3-8-10 K Dtaley 3 

7 0100 KMGDFPERUABtD.FAiAJanb^B-IO . WJO , Ctmnoi7 

8 12-4 RESOUNDBT15(DJ^I JGnaJen3-8-10 - .. Ghtedl 

9 33-6 AMAMY101 (Dri HDunsonJcnK3-8-5 GCtotorlO 
10 6082 DANCE SEQUENCE 19 (D.F) M Soule 3-8-5. ... Pa Eddery 4 

7-2 CnA Pool. 4-1 Dance Sequence. 9-2 Monas*. 7-1 Kata Alfluyttai. 
Cyrano s Lad. Arrowy. 8-1 other-:. 


C Dwyer 5 
SDUMnnsB 
. W Ryan 9 
.. M Fenton 6 
. RHughes? 


COURSE SPECIALISTS 


TRAINERS: D (ate, 16 winner ham 29 nrr&z 552%' M Wane. 3 
ham U. 273% M Belt 8 from 31. 258%: U Dumon. 13 (ran S3. 
22 6%. M Johnston. 24 hum 117. 205%. D Money. 10 hom 49. 20 i\ 
JOCKEYS: Mrc L Ponce. 4 wmai bom 13 rates 30 8V U Fenton 
10 ham 45. 222%. W R Switun. 4 horn lB. 232%. h Dariey 48 
tan 253.190%. G Bsiteeff. 7 horn 38. 


8.05 WiaiAM YOUNGER EAST ESI 
ANGLIA FILLIES HANDICAP (£3.425: 713yd) (12) 

1 3542 D(VK QUEST 12 H Cecfi 3-9-10 .. . Pte Eddery 8 

2 6520 MERULE14JGosdoi3-9-9 .. BFM1 

3 -602 AHR 58 H Ttwnyui Jones 3-9-7. . G Carter 6 

4 0302 BA0GBIBAY28COwver3-9-8 _JoFtunom|7) 11 

5 0500 YEZZA8(V)AJante3-9-2.WJO'ComorlO 

6 6-05 SIZZLING ROMP7 DHum 4-9-0 . . JT»9 

7 -004 INFANTRY DANCER BG Bravery 3-8-12. . .. DR McCabe 7 

B 455 KMC CHORD 20 JFtoetiwc 3-8-11 NVateyp|J2 

9 (»3 CHARBSEDANCBI22C« 3-8-11 . . WV*D«fc5 

10 0-20 POLAR REFRAIN 7 C Caw 3-3-9 TGUcLrt4*n2 

11 0-04 DAFFOOA. EXPRES5 66 U Ryan 3-8-2 .... UBaM(5)3 

12 0006 CHRISTWJFUGHT21 (F)CGdtft5.7-3-1 UFertnn4 

4-1 Ate 5-1 Omw Cwa. 6-’ Tonic Carl 7-1 Cfcgi■se Oarter 6jJyn Bn. 8-1 
DtotoSJ Eshk. feScq Boro 10-1 kt.bt. 


COURSE SPECIALISTS 


TRA1NFRS J Gasdai 21 erraiers mm 27 rurma^ ’41%. H 
Thomson Jones. 20 Iran 84. 23 2%. H Cecil. 20 darn 86. 22.7% D 
Uxta. 10 from 45.22 2% M Ctotejftan. 10 from 53 18 9%. G KYragg. 
12 horn 70.171% 

JOCKEYS: K Daley. 12 aramen bom 43 rite. 250V Pto Eddav. IS 
tocm 67 235V R Hagte. 3 bom 15. 200%. VV fi/m 23 Horn 134. 
172%, D Harmon 9 Horn 57.156'-: G Hnd. 9 Horn 60.150% 


BUNKERED FIRST TIME: Salisbury: 3 4& Conspicuous 4 JSBnoJ 
Gtorpsti Yarmouth; 7.05 Aztec TiaireBer a 06 Yezza 


THUNDKER 
5.50 Gunmaker. 6.20 Always Happy. 
Memory. 7.20 Idiom. 7.50 Too much Ti 
Jenzsoph. 


6.50 Distant 
oosoon. 8^0 


GOING: GOOD TO RRM (GOOD IN PLACES) _SIS 

5.50 JERZEES SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE 

(Amateurs: £1,839:2m IQ (6 runners) 

1 2-0P GUNUAKEH 10 (B.S) B Lleweta 7-1 

2 66-2 SOUTHERN RIDGE 10 RFrart 4-11-5 

3 DPO- N0RDLY5 9FB Lterthm 5-10-9 _. 

4 S>/2 MIAN UNDR 15 RPocw* 12-10-7 . - 

5 ltf> AIR COMMAND 33FCNarii 6-10-0 

6 OOO- IKS NQRWATT147 N Diorrecn 6-ltW) 


7-11-10 J L Uawctyn 15) 
A H tto fewn h |7) 
Mbs E J Jonas (7) 
_ . L Jtflotd (7) 
.. P Phillips (7) 
.... S Darts (7) 


5-4 5wtem Ridge. 3-1 infian Min. 7-2 Gwmtoa. 8-1 No«> lr>. 14-1 otac. 

6.20 AUGUST EVENING JUVENILE HURDLE 

(3-Y-O' £2.148:2m 10 (5) 

1 1 ALWAYS HAPPY 12 (CO.F) U P** 1HZ . ... D Brtdgwta 

2 ARCH BOW 1*»teK Gauge 10-10 . . .. DSkyime 

J 3 BEN BOWDEN 12 MBbnrtnd 10-10 - - DGategher 

4 OJRRBTT LEADER 8F Mfei K George 10-10 JRKaranap 

5 WATER IUSFC MH.ODY 378F T Gretolisad 10-5 W Humphreys 
1-5 AImk Ftevr. 11-2 Ben Bouden. 20-1 ftta Uusk Melody. 25-1 often 

6.50 MISSION IMPOSSIBLE NOVICES CHASE 

(£2.818' 2m 5111 Oyd) (5) 

Mr A Chates-Jones 
R Johnson 


1 6P21 HZAL12 (FjHIftmers MI-5 .. . 

2 3*- AN01H8T COMEDY 109P R Lee 6-10-1? 


3 55-2 DGIANT M94DRY T9 (B.F.G) P Hotfc 7-10-12 . A P McCoy 

4 35-5 GREAT UNCLE 12 ff.fi) J Dufenee 8-10-12. . .. PHenfcy (5) 

5 P03- SARACBTS BDY 298 M Ourdies 8-10-12 . Mrl Jettord 
4-6 DOSS Memory 100-JO HtzaJ. 11-2 Aixxhe Corned?. 10-1 ottos 

7.20 MIDSUMMER MAIDEN HURDLE H3QI 

(£2.190.2m 6f) (8) 

1 0 CROWN IVORY 67 PAfichens 5-11-5 SFra 

2 005- FATHER POWER 77 P Sown 8-f 1-5 . ... RAXnsan 

3 i-42 CBM 12 Mr. J team 9-H-5. JCitoclypI 

4 -404 MRAMARE 15JWdsm 6-11-5. PHfrtay(5l 

3 30-6 M POPPLETW 68 RBroSMen 7-11-5 _ LHmr 

6 KERWER 27F HManMfS 4-11-2-- * A CtataJones 

7 00- F’OU-YAMtA 142 M Muggeridge 5-11-0 — _ . 5 Curran 

8 -P55 LPT« TEMPO 14 FFandl7-!1-0.HGreene 

W Idem. 3-t Up The Tempo. 5-1 Fata Poms. 6-1 Ift PeppWon. 7-1 Wmrao 
18-1 Cumn hoy. 20-1 own 


7.50 NIGHT IS YOUNG HANDICAP 

CHASE (E2.859:2m 11 Oyd) (6) 

1 12P- TOOUUCHTOOSOON30B(COflMhpa B-11-10 D 

2 20P- FEMWKfM49ff.lLS)RHQ(lBes9-10-12- . TDbs 

3 -651 MANAM0UR10 (CD.n R Lee 9-10-9 t7tx) . .. . C 

4 3033 RYWG21AD10<C/.G|HManners 13-10-0 .. ADotrtng 

5 6453 DUKEOFOREAM512 (F)RBato6-1D-0.. BPn 

6 00-4 GAB» 10 (DAG] Br-crtrai 11-104 .... te ft Thornton (7) 
54 Tooredi Toococn. TM Urami. Ferwirt. 7-1 Flpng Zbd. 151 otas. 

8.20 BIRDIE HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£2.699:2m 6f) (5) 

1 2P-1 MAMOND CUT 13 (C.F.G) M Fhpe 8-12-C- DBridgrttat 

2 IM JBCSOPH15IF.5jPHo«H51l-0 .. . _ APUeCoy 

3 2/3 RELDRDGE 35 (C.S) M Ujggendpe7-10-12 ... BPoral 

4 POtP BIT Of A TOUCH 1088 (0.5) HF/wJ 10-10-7 . . .. JFrasi 

5 -063 BEAM HE IP SCOTTY 10(G) NHw*e7-1tM)_. J Citoktoy (3) 
54 Jenanpfi M Dtonond Cut 51 Fisidndge. KM Bern Me Up Stony. 50-1 
Bit 01A Touch. 




Salisbury 


Going: good 

1.45 (61 212ydJ 1. OflONTES (tone 
O'Neil. 2-1 fc»v). 2. JiwSnaflcn (J Oumn. 
25-1). 3. Satabami (M Hdts. 14-1) ALSO 
RAN 11-4 Sword Ami (40H. 9-2 Ras¬ 
mussen (Sih). 10 Ludo. 14 Fantasy Get. 

16 Juflena Mia. F>ataefnon. 33 Hivw Fxig, 
Swan island (6lh) 11 ran. hi 1KI. I'AI. 
nk nl. R Manner al Easl Ewrteigh Tore. 
E290; E1.40.ES 10. £380 OF E1399D 
Tno £17230 (part won. pool o( H06 83 
canted Ityward lo 4 45 ai Salisbuy 
wdayi CSF:E45&2. 

2.15 (6(| 1. MUKADDAR iH Cochrane. 
20-11. 2. Polish Warrior (J Retd. 9-2). 3. 
aeon Power (D Harrison. 9-4 la</) ALSO 
RAN. 6 Hattab (Jlhl. Sudesl (SUl). & 
Anwas (Wi). 12 Arthur's 5eai. Merciless 
Cop. 14 ArHydY Knos. Maiyiavy. Shaip 
Hat. 2S Lite On The Sirwt, Shrer S«saeL 
50 Topps Tno 14 ran 3. 1*1. ite. 3W. 
1 til CBenrlead at Epsom T«e: £27.70; 
£570. £220. PI 90 DF: £50.30. Trio. 
£88.70 CSF-C114 36 

2.45 (50 1. BOWDEN ROSE (J Qutnn. 
9 - 1 ). 2, Ama 2 fng Bay (L Denoti. 7-2). 3. 
My Melody P«ms (J Cairoll. 5-2 f-tavi) 
ALSO RAN 5-2 jMav Bumv Boo (4th). 5 
Welsh Mb! (5th|. 10 Lunar Mist (5th). E 
ian <?(. nt. W. 31. hd M Blanshard at 

Lamboum Tote £10 00; £200. 
:.4Q DF- £1350 CSF'£37.88 

3.15 dm II 209yd) 1. ASHBY WLL (R 
Cochnane. 11-2 lav): 2. Thftchmasw 
[Paul Eddeiy. 10-1): 3. Shatattreno (T 
Sprate. 20-1) ALSO RAN 13-2 Fairy 
Knight [4th) Sweet Pavlova. 7 Indian 
Nectai. 15-2 Law Dancer (6(h). 9 
Monumenr. 11 Mimosa (5th), 14 Runic 
Symbol, 16 Exemption. Racng Hawk, 25 
WarEphe. 33WltuH Lad, SO Rtaenoncr IS 
ran. Wv ‘hi. Hi. 3fcl. M. R Rowe at 
Sftxrington. Tote E6.50: £270 C2.90. 
£5 70 DF: E27E0 Trio. £448.70 CSF 
£56 87 Tricasi £960 68. 

3 45 llm II 20Sryd) 1. ALTAMURA (L 
Defton. 5-1): 2. wn ABiawa (W Carson. 
5-2 lav); 3. Ta Awun (S WNlwoitti. 9-2) 
ALSO RAN- 7-2 Sardonc. 6 Flame VaBey 
(4lh). 14 Carttoan Quest, Parrot Jungle, 
33 Grysda. Vlhghl (6lhl.9ran. 2fel. 21.2£l. 


131 J Gosden at Newmarital. Tote: C4 70: 
£1 50. £1 70. El .80. DF- £920. Tno: 
£2120 CSF £17.67 

4.15 (a 212yd) 1, MISTY CAY a Oum. 
5-2 Ibv|; 2. Marsh Mangold (N Adams. 
33-1); 3. Bmadgote Flyer (A McGfcne. 
7-1) ALSO RAN: 3 Dashing Rocksvilte, 6 
Spondulicks (5th). 7 Abacan. 14 
Grove tail Lad. 16 Fbtra) Flame. 33 Silent 
Valley. 40 Scanots (6*h). W*ys OoutJe, 
50 Rumng Free (4th), 66 Top Tafar. 13 
ran. «l, sh hd, 1*1, iw, 21. S Dow ai 
Epsom. Tote £3 80: £1.60. £4.90. £2.90. 
DF £38 20. Tno- £26010 CSF: £68.82 
4.45 (61212yd) 1. GONZAGA fl Sprate. 
10-1): 2. Anerttar Nigh! (W J Cr Connor. 
33-1): 3. American Whisper (G Hind. 
25-1). ALSO RAN- 11-10 lav Mean Bias) 
(5lh). 9-2 KalaJ. 15-2 Hltfi Edreme (-Uhl, 
9 Chairmans Daughter. 10 BerylUra 20 
Danka (6th). Norman Conquest. Smart 
Prospeo 11 ran Mu h>l. 41. sh hd. 41 J 
Duilop at Aiuidel. Toie £14.20. £3.10. 
£5 BO. £340. DF- £257 60 Trio £401 70 
(pari won. pool ol £336.10 carted lotwaid 
to 4.45 at Salisbury loday) CSF: £238.51. 

5.15 (Im 4fl 1. KRISTAL BREEZE (J 
Reid, 12-1). 2. Rasayd (W R Swrixmi. 
13-2). 3, Shining Dancor (T Ciunn. 13-2) 
ALSO RAN 5-1 lav Dramatic Moment. 7 
Dalwhlnme. 8 Aqa Ot Realty («h). 10 
Ayunli (5th). Hawanala. Rocquame Bay 
(4lh|. 12 Lady Bankas. Turia. (4 Evidence 
to Cttiel. 25 Reilerale. 40 Lcium 14 ran. 
NR- Glow Forum. Sh hd. nk. 1 Kl. 1 '*1. nk. 
W Muirai Lamboum Toie £11 70: £4 80. 
£1.90. E3 BO DF: E23 10 Trio- E25.10 
CSF: £8772 Tncasl' £523.61. 

Plawpot £221.00. Quadpot £42.50. 

Beverley 

Going: good lo firm 

2.0Q(1m 3»216yd| 1. NORTH BEAR (O 
Pears. 15-81, 2. Durham (A Clark, 
100-301. 3. North Ardar (S COpp. Evens 
lav) ALSO RAN 25 Chesters Quest (6th). 
50 Cramberta (4th). Ptmsboy (Slhl 8 ran. 
bl, II, a 41. 20. Mis S Smith at Bmptev. 
Toie- C*80; £130. £1.80. DF £3 80. 
CSF: £8.47. 

230 (Im lOOydl 1. BHOCTUNE GOLD 
(K Parley, i t- 10 lav). 2. SheBas Dream 
(A Clark. 14-1); 3. Stmand (J Tale, 11-2| 


ALSO RAN 4 Parftament Piece (Oh). 9-2 
lnsh Sea (5th) 9 Hi Rock (4ih), 25 Battle 
Cokxrs. 33 Flonle'm. Forget Pans 9 ran 
Til. l%l. HI. W. ital Mrs M Rewetey al 
Ealtbum Toie £2 30. £1.20, £2 60. £1.60 
DF £21.70. Tno E3B90 CSF. £1839 

3.00 (51) 1. BRECONGILL LAD (N 
Cormorion. 8-1). 2. Able Sheriff (G 
Parian. 11-1): 3. Just Dissident (D 
McKeown. S-i) ALSO RAN ii-a lav 
Ned's Bonanza (6th). 4 Captain Carol. 7 
Juwa i5th). Rich Ghw». 0 Premium Gm 
(4lh). 16TheW&d.20RotheriteldParii 10 
ran. hi, i*il. nk. 3. VI Mss S Had al 
Mtddtehain. Tote. £930: £240. £3 60. 
£270 DF £3790 Tno: £253.40 CSF: 
£85.52. Tricast. £674 J9. 

350 (5n 1. FOR OLD TIMES SAKE (M 
Babd, 4-1); 2. Doubled (K Faflon. 5-2 
lav). 3. Person Fund (Dale Gtoson. 3-1) 
ALSO RAN: 5 Largesse (4th), 11-2 Styeif 
Flyer (5thj. 9 Woet Ees Girt (6th). 6 ran. 
Nk. Ld. h\. 1 ui. 71. J Beny atCockarham. 
Tote £500: £300 £180 DF £670 
CSF £14 15. 

4.00 (im It 207yd) 1. CUMBRIAN 
MAESTRO (K Dariey. 16-11; 2. tsitofl (P 
McCabe. 7-1). 3. General Glow (J F 
Eoan. 4-7 lav) ALSO RAN: 7-2 Contract 
Bridge (4th). 12 Galapino (Stfij 5 ran. I>«. 
Fakxn's Flame 2 hi. 21. hd. BI T EasJerby 
at Mafton Tote E9.40: £2.70. £2 50 DF 
£30.70. CSF- £9285 

450 (71100yd) 1. FURTHSt OUTLOOK 
(K Fallon. 5-4 (l4av Richard Evans's 
nap). 2. Stories To Tel! (W Ryan. 5-4 |1- 
fan. 3. Maradl (K Dariey. 5-1) ALSO 
RAN 20 Tnpia Term 33 bin & James 
(4th), Mutahadeth. Secret Pass (6lh). 
Tirage (5th) 6 ran 21. U. hd. K-l, 1V.I. M 
Stoula al Newmarital. Tote. E2J20: £1.10. 
£110. £1 10 DF. £200 CSF. £3.34. 

5.00 (2m 3Sydl 1 RUSHEN RAJDER (L 
Chamodr. 20-11:2. Embryonic (K Fallon. 
6-T). 3, Great Oration (N Ka 
ALSO RAN- 5-2 lav The Swan. 5 i 
Smoke I51hl. 6 Double Agent (4ih). 13-2 
Sea Vidor (Bthl. 11 Ckewt Colleen. 25 
Colege Don (pul- 9 ran. 2KI. 31. sh hd. 71. 
171 KHogq on Isle cA Man. Tde: £14.00. 
E3i». £220. £210 DF £41.30. Tno 
£6610 CSF LI 22 14 Tricasi: £959.00 
Placepat £39280. Quad pot £53.70. 


>5 


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urn. rhsrv>imlHj>rc iunrpri riAitiiK. lo speak for 21 .M per cent. 
































































GOLF: AUSTRALIAN DEFENDS BRITISH OPEN TITLE AGAINST MOST COSMOPOLITAN WOMEN'S FIELD EVER ASSEMBLED 


Webb ready 
to repeat 
her Woburn 
triumph 


ALLSPORT 


By Patricia Davies 


AT THIS time last year. 
Evelyn and Robert Webb were 
at home in Ayr in northern 
Queensland, bleary-eyed and 
disbelieving as the voire on the 
other end of the telephone 
regaled them with details of 
how their daughter. Kanie. 
was winning the Weetabix 
Women’s British Open at Wo¬ 
burn by six shots. 

Twelve months on and the 
Webb family, including youn¬ 
ger daughter. Katie, are at the 
scene of the triumph, able to 
believe their eyes rather than 
their ears as Kanie starts the 
defence of her title on the 
Duke's Course today. 

She has proved that the 
victory, her first as a profes¬ 
sional. was no fluke and that 
she is already, at 21 . one of the 
best women golfers in the 
world. At the end of last year, 
in a typically impressive piece 
of punditry, filter Thomson, 
her fellow Australian, forecast 
that it would not take Webb 
long to become a force and she 
has not let him down. 

In her first three events on 
the LPGA (Ladies’ Profession¬ 
al Golf Association) Tour, 
Webb finished second, first 
and second, and did not finish 
our of the top ten until her 
seventh loumamenL In her 
ninth event, the Sprint Title- 
holders Championship, she 
was first again. 

There is enough money for a 
house in Florida and a car. It 
is a more modest vehicle than 
the Ferrari that Laura Davies, 
a good friend, has just pur- 
chased but Webb was due to 
go for a spin yesterday after¬ 
noon. “I've sat in a couple 
before." she said, “but I’ve 
never been for a drive." 

The only sour note since 
Webb’s win at Wobum has 
been that Todd Haller, the 
fianre who caddied for her. is 
no longer with her. either on 
or off the course. Webb is 
reluctant to discuss the matter 
but she did admit that "it was 
so hard being together 24 
hours a day". To cope so well 
with all the attention, emotion¬ 
al upheaval and a new way of 


life in a strange country is a 
tribute to her resilience and 
composure, and to the help 
and advice she has received 
from other players. 

Although she has now re¬ 
placed Davies as No 1 on the 
US money-list, after finishing 
second in her two most recent 
events, Webb is not favourite 
for the championship. She is 
quoted at 11-1 by William Hill, 
the bookmakers, behind Da¬ 
vies and Annika Sorenstam, 
who are 9-2 joint-favourites. 
LiseJone Neumann and Trish 
Johnson are 14-1, with Dottle 
Pepper and Meg Mallon, of 
the United States, both on a 
tempting 16-1. 

There are players from 22 
countries competing this week 
as the British Open begins to 
take on a truly international 
look. Tony Greer, the statisti¬ 
cian of the International Man¬ 
agement Group (TMG), is 
convinced that it is the mast 
cosmopolitan women’s 
championship ever, any¬ 
where, and has the lists to 
prove it. 

Twenty of the top 30 on the 
LPGA money-list are here, 
including the top five (only one 
of whom. Malian, is Ameri¬ 
can). The top 50 from the 
American Express European 
Tour are here, barring Mardi 
Lunn. Sadly, she and her 
sister Karen, champion in 
1993, had to withdraw because 
of the death of their father. 
There are also seven of the top 
12 from the Japan LPGA 
money-list competing, plus the 
American-based Japanese. 
Mayumi Hirase and Hiromi 
Kobayashi. 

The prize-money is a sub¬ 
stantial £500,000, which 
counts on both the US and 
European money-lists, and 
there are Solheim Cup points 
on offer, a matter of some 
interest to both the Americans 
and the Europeans anxious to 
do tattle against each other at 
St Pierre next month. 

Being an Australian, Webb 
has no such worries and she 
might well triumph again — a 
cereal winner, so to speak. 



Perfect match: Davies, left, believes that she has the natural strength in her game to confront the supremacy of Faldo among British golfers 

Davies measures up to Faldo challenge 


By John Hopktns 

GOLF CORRESPONDENT 

THIS morning Laura Davies 
wfll set out to win the fifth 
major championship of her 
career when she plays the first 
round of the Weetabix Wom¬ 
en’s British Open at Wobum. 
Meanwhile, in Denver, Colo¬ 
rado. Nick Faldo will try to 
forget the disappointment of 
finishing 65th in the US PGA 
Championship last week, the 
final major championship of 
the men’s calendar, and try to 
win his second tournament in 
the United Stales this year. 

Davies MBE, who owns a 
Ferrari among other cars and 
loves sport, and Faldo MBE. 
a fisherman and follower of 
the band, Huey Lems .'and. 
The News, are Britain’s best 
golfers. Davies’s style of play 
is based on enormous power, 
a velvet touch and an uncom¬ 
plicated attitude. Faldo’s on 
the relentless elimination of 
error helped by an intimidat¬ 


ing presence. Davies is 
ranked No 2 in the world 
among women, Faldo fourth 
among the men. If Davies 
were to play Faldo from the 
same tees, who would win? 

"I’d hold my own," Davies 
said. Even without the advan¬ 
tage of driving from the 
ladies* tees? “Oh sure," she 
said. "Length is no problem." 

Indeed it is not as Tom 
Watson, who played with 
Davies in Australia earlier 
this year, confirmed. "She hits 
the bail further than I Ye ever 
seen a woman hit it" he said. 
"She is very strong. She's got 
big long hands and she makes 
a strong move at the balL 
From the same tees, for the 
most part I could out-drive 
her but every now and then, 
she’d out-drive me. With her 
short irons — from wedge to 
seven-iron—she is a good five 
yards longer than I am." 

God has given Davies all 
the levers necessary to help 
her propel a golf ball a long 



By Robert Sheehan, bridge correspondent 

This hand illustrates a point of dummy play, in which the 
declarer plays on a side suit before drawing trumps to avoid 
losing control. 

Dealer South Love all Robber bridge 


*9865 

VKQ104 

♦ J 9 7 6 

♦ 8 



W 


1C 

3S 

4S 


An 


3 C 
4D 


Pass 


Contract: Four Spades by South. Lead king of hearts 


Norths Four Diamonds is a 
cue-bid: however, when South 
rebids Four Spades North 
wisely passes. In cue-bidding 
sequences in which four of a 
major is a possible contract, it 
is usual to play that a bid of 
the major is an anempt to play 
there. 

The defence start with three 
rounds of hearts, and you ruff 
the third round. How should 
you continue? 

The danger in drawing 
trumps immediately is that u 
they are 4-2, you will have 
none left when you start on 
dubs. Then if you lose a dub 
trick the defence will be able to 
cash a heart. 

The solution is to play dubs 
first, while dummy still has a 
trump to look after the heart 
force. It is best to lead low to 
the king of clubs, and continue 
with another towards the ace. 


If East discards on the 
second dub you win the ace 
and play a third round. If East 
fallows to the second dub you 
finesse — whether West wins 
or ruffe, the clubs are now set 
up. In both cases a fourth 
heart lead from the defence 
can be ruffed in dummy, and 
then you draw trumps and 
cash your established clubs. 

Do you see why low to the 
king is the best way to start the 
dubs? It is because that way, if 
the dubs are no worse than 
3-1, you cannot lose both a dub 
ruff and a dub trick. If you 
start with the ace of dubs and 
find West has QIQx, East will 
ruff the king of dubs and you 
will still have a dub to lose. 

□ Robert Sheehan writes on 
bridge Monday to Friday in 
Sport and in the Weekend 
section on Saturday. 




By Philip Howard 


orteguina 

a. A pass 

b. A melancholy serenade 

c. Sweet sherry 

REMUAGE 

a. Crew of oarsmen 

b. Turning bottles 

c. Old age (Remus) 


PSEUDORANDOM 

a. False praying 

b. Not really random 

c. Hypocrisy 
REINGA 

a. A dog sledge 

b. The afterlife 

c. A Norse goddess 

Answers on page 42 



By Raymond Keene 
CHESS CORRESPONDENT 

Vienna stars 

An elite tournament is taking 
place in Vienna, which has 
attracted many of the world’s 
top players, with the exception 
of Garry Kasparov. After four 
rounds the increasingly-suc- 
cessful Bulgarian grand¬ 
master, Veselm Topalov, leads 
with three points, ahead of 
Anatoly Karpov on 2.5. The 
world ranked No 3. Vladimir 
Kramnik, got off to a dreadful 
start, losing his first two 
games. 

White: Boris Gelfand 
Blade Anatoly Karpov 
Bank Austria. Vienna, August 
1996 

Queen's Indian Defence 


1 

N13 

Nf6 

2 

C4 ’ 

b6 

3 

03 

Bb7 

4 

ag2 

e6 

5 

0-0 

Be 7 

6 

Nc3 

0-0 

7 

Pel 

<S5 

8 

cxd5 

exd5 

9 

d4 

Na0 

10 

Bt4 

cS 

11 

dxc5 

NxcS 

12 

Rcl 

a6 

13 

a3 

Re8 

14 

Nd4 

Bd6 

15 

8 x 08 

Qxd6 

16 

Od2 

Rat® 

17 

Redl 

96 

T8 

Qf4 

Qxf4 

19 

Gpft4 . 

Kf8 

20 

83 

Rd6 

21 

b4 

Ne6 

22 

Nco2 

Re7 

23 

a4 

Nd8 

24 

a5 

Bcfi 

25 

Nc3 

Bea 

26 

B11 

bxaS 

27 

tK35 

Rb7 

28 

Ral 

Rc7 

29 

Na2 

Rb7 

30 

13 

Ne6 

31 

Rdbl 

Re7 

n 




32 

Nb4 

Nc5 

33 

Rcl 

Rb7 

34 

Rabl 

N1d7 

35 

Nbc6 

Rc7 

38 

Ne5 

Ke7 

37 

Rc3 

re 

38 

Nxd7 

Kxd7 

39 

Rb8 

Ne6 

40 

Rxc7+ 

Nxc7 

41 

Kf2 

Ke7 

42 

(5 

95 

43 

Kel 

Bb5 

44 

&<b5 

Nxb5 

45 

NxbS 

axb5 

46 

Rxb5 

Rc6 

47 

Rxd5 

Rc3 

48 

Kd2 

Rafl 

49 

Kc2 

Rxe3 

50 

Kb2 

Re2+ 

51 

Kb3 

Rxh2 

52 

a6 

Rhl 

53 

Kb4 

Ral 

54 

Ra5 

Rb1 + 

55 

Kc5 

Rb8 

56 

a7 

Rafl 

57 

Kcb 

H5 

58 

Kb7 

Rxa7+ 

59 

Kxa7 

Kd6 

60 

Kb6 

M 

81 

RcS 

h3 

62 

Rc2 

KeS 

63 

Rh2 

KxT5 

64 

Rxh3 

KI4 

65 

Kc5 

rs 

66 

Kd4 

g4 

67 

txg4 

6tg4 

68 

Rh8 

KJ3 

69 

Kd3 

Black resigns 


Diagram of final position 



CAREER DETAILS 


LAURA DAVIES 

Age: 33. 

Wins: 45. 

Major championships: US Women’s 
Open 1987. McDonald’s LPGA champ¬ 
ionship 1994, 1996. du Mauria Classic 
1996 

Turned p rofe s sional: 1985 
Earnings: £2.677.255 
Worid ranking: No 2 

NICK FALDO 

Age: 39 
Wms:3S 

Major c ha mpionships: Open 1937. 
1990.1992: Masters 1989.1990. 1996. 
Turned professional: 1976 
Earnings: £3,074.931 
World ranking: No 4. 


way — long, powerful arms 
and legs, as well as hands 
that generate considerable 
speed. Sfie is the longesthitter 
on the women's tour, averag¬ 
ing 257 yards. 

Faldo's average is only five 
yards more but whereas aver¬ 
ages in Faldo’s case are rele¬ 
vant, they are less so in 
Davies's case because she is 
so long that she often has to 
rein herself in and use an iron 
for accuracy. Sure enough, 
she thinks she drives much 
further. “Oh. I whack it about 
285," she said* as if there was 
nothing special about that at 
all. "I hit my two-iron about 
230 yards. 1 most admit I am 
very long with my short irons. 


I can hit a nine-iron 170 
yards." 

In the 1920s, Bobby Jones, 
the legendary amateur, de¬ 
scribed Joyce Wethered as the 
greatest striker of a ball be 
had ever seen, man or 
woman. Wethered was truly 
exceptional. Most women do 
not have the strength to 
generate clubhead "speed, 
which is a handicap from 
rough and bunkers, and in 
generating backspin. 

“Golf for women is a lot 
harder than for men." Nick 
Price said. “They don’t have 
the ability to put a lot of spin 
on the balL Why? Strength. 
We can spin those wedge 
shots a lot more. But also they 
can’t stop their mid-irons as 
quickly as we can so they are 
not so accurate as we are." 

Any advantage in the quali¬ 
ty of striking that Faldo might 
appear to have over Davies is, 
however, neutralised by Da¬ 
vies’s strength. “I’ve got a 
game more like men’s." Da¬ 
vies said. 

"I can handle a long golf 
course whereas some of the 
other women couldn'L They 
do not have the power in their 
hands and wrists. I am strong 
enough to get out of the rough 
and play those bunker shots. 
I've got imagination- I’d back 
myself in any short-game 


skills contest against any 
man." 

Price believes that women 
do not putt as well as the men 
and Davies agree. "It’s 
because of the quality of the 
greens we play on." she said. 
“Ours vary so much it is hard 
to improve. The men’s tour 
provides them with good 
greens all the time. That is 
why they are better." 

"In terms of dominance in 
their respective fields, there’s 
no comparison between Lau¬ 
ra and Faldo." Rice said. 
“Laura has dominated wom¬ 
en’s golf far more than Faldo 
has men's golf. Every time she 
plays wdL she wins by a 
street" 

Would she win a match 
with Faldo? If it were 
strokeplay, Faldo’s relentiess- 
ness and attention to detail 
should triumph. His scoring 
average over 44 rounds in the 
United States season is 70.02 
compared with Davies's 70.72 
in 43 rounds. At matchplay, 
though. Davies should have 
the edge, even though by one 
yardstick of adventurous play 
— eagles and birdies — her 
tally of 15S is 24 fewer than 
Faldo's 182. “If we played off 
the same tees on a course of. 
perhaps, 7.000 yards. I’d fan¬ 
cy myself to win two or three 
times out of ten." Davies said. 


BOWLS 

Lindores 

suffers 

last-bowl 

defeat 

By Gordon Allan 

IOYCE LINDORES. of Scot¬ 
land. suffered her first defeat 
in the women's world singles 
championship ar r 

Spa yesterday. Judy Howat, 
from New Zealand, won 2^23 
but. with six qualifying 
rounds to go, lindores is still 
at the top of her section and 
well placed to reach the final 
on Sunday. 

Taking the mat up tne 
green. HowaL a vastly experi¬ 
enced player from Wellington, 
battled back from 19-15 down 
to lead 24-21. Lindores scored 
a double and then held three 
shots on the derisive end. 
Howat cut out two of them 
and. with her last bowl, moved 
the jack sideways for the 
winner. 

Margaret Johnston, the de¬ 
fending champion from Ire¬ 
land. lost 25-13 to Babs 
Anderson, of Botswana, in the 
morning but then edged past 
Wendy Line, of England. 25- 
24, to stay in contention. 
Johnston has suffered three 
defeats so far and cannot 
afford another. 

Rita Jones, of Wales, heads 


Results 


38 


the other section with a better 
shots difference than Carmen 
Anderson, of Norfolk Island, 
and Willow Fong, the Fijian 
who represents Australia. 
Fong toppled the previous 
leader, Jo Peacock, of South 
Africa, 25-23. Peacock is now 
in fourth position. 

In the fours, Scotland, the 
holders, drew 22-22 with the 
leaders. South Africa. Scot¬ 
land dropped two shots on the 
last end against the South 
Africans, who were without 
their regular lead, Jannie de 
Beer. De Beer fell down the 
stairs in her hotel on Tuesday 
night breaking her left arm. 
Marge Ellis, the team manag¬ 
er. and an international in her 
own right, toe* De Beer’s 
place. 

South Africa stay at the top 
with Israel second, Scotland 
third and England fourth. The 
England team of Norma 
Shaw, Jean Baker, Gill Fitz¬ 
gerald and Maty Price beat 
Malaysia, their unexpected 
conquerors in the triples, 21-17 
after making a slow start 

Australia easily beat Papua 
New Guinea to lead the other 
section, with New Zealand 
second and Jersey third. 
Wales stand sixth. 

The optimists who thought 
that the home countries, with 
their superior knowledge of 
the Leamington greens, would 
dominate or even monopolise 
the championships are wide of 
the mark so far. 


LEGAL & PUBLIC NOTICES 


0171-782 7344 


□ Raymond Keene writes on chess 

Monday to Friday in Sport and in 
the Weekend section on Saturday. 




By Raymond Keene 

White to play. This position is 
from the game Engholm — 
Nilson, Mahno 1937. Despite 
the reduced forces. Black 
found a way to break through 
on the kingside and score a 
quick von. Can you see how7 



PUBLIC NOTICES 


ABRAHAMS, JOHN ABRAHAMS 

late of Paddington, L ond on M2 

dlod at HIphmto, London 196 on 

29Ua Jnly 199S 
(Eeteto a boot QS.OOO) 
BASKERVILLE. RONALD ARTHUR 

BASKBRV1LLE tola of GuUdCord. 

Saner died there on Id Mar 

1996 

(Beene about £12X00) 

BELL. JOHN BELL tMO of Dept- 
3 died at Sontfe- 
SR1 on 29 

199S 

not EB.OOO) 
COUPL AND, JOAN KATHLEEN 

COOflAND Sptno r ot l aw ad 

KtaRAoT. London NOT died at 

WBpNn. M lddl — oa on 23 Jana 

SSK^L^JaK^SoSS Into 
Norwood. London SE19 C 
■bare on 27 rabiiui . 1996 

(Enin a bout £170,000} 

GILES. HOWARD WILLIAM t n mg 

lato OT Lambeth. | 

EM ib na on Tti nai malm 1990 

(EMo about £9,000) 

WUfflLEt. MAXlblCB HANDLEY 

otboi-otao MAOKfCE THOMAS 

HANDLEY tea of Dazbj dlod 
tbom on 21 tall 1996 

(Bonn about E2SJOOO) 

HODGES BOO OEU7SST, CECILIA 
BSnjOET HODGES otherwise 


rsgr 

CEacnta about £5000) 

HOLDEN. WILLIAM BOLDEN MM 
OT Flraaoot^ Daaoa dlad than am 
or aboat 13 Match 1999 
(Batata about £5.000) 

HOLMES. JOHN LESLIE HOLMES 
laio Of BoUbolL 

dlad (ban on 13_ 

CEanto aboat E7BJDO0) 

INGRAM, JAMBS 
INGRAM ban of En 
mte^bam dlod than an 

(Batata “boat MEMO) 

IMCB, ARTHUR LEECH law of 
BMfM, ImtdM at Cambor- 
wan. UMbb BBS cm 13 Itonm 
bn 1995 

CBetaia aboat 6350,000) 
57MALLEX. PAma O'MALLEY 
Inn Of Ptymoaxh. Dnra 
Own an 7 n a r a whui 199S 
(Eatata aboat F3KJ3QQ3 
BO B EA TS. MAB GARET 
BETH ROBERT*. SMnau 
WuU^.KnroSdthat ra 7 

(Batata about £7,000) 

RIDEL RONALD DAVID RYDER 
MM of Comma, Warn am-a 

^ lio3SK 1V ~ 


LEGAL NOTICES 


Charity: Tbe Oonopotblc Edoca- 


Cbariry 


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HaNsnciAxizs T O bend m 

flJt mu UNDER IBBTH ACT 

1925 SECTION 27 
Ea DE PDSHM MAHJWALLA 

PURSUANT to eba Tim toe Act j 

1925 NOTICE b glean that all 


ANDUFE AS3UEANci*rLAN 

Ctbe Pita—) 

Nodca la twiobf fllvan that par- 

raanr to ». Zf of tha Truetea Act 

192S that anr person having a 

claim agntnat. or wd ibnam 10 a 

ttn- 


nCH la given that all ££“££55 


SSIot 


V 38) 


TAYLOR. DOREEN MAVIS TAYLOR 
IWnwtr law of Blimliiiihaia 
Waat Midland! there on 14 
October 1992 
Ibou about 63000) 
h e ab a 

•arv Solicitor (n£x I 

Chamtwrs. 2B Broaf--- 

SWIM 9JS, fading aSkh Iba 

Ttaaeurr SsCttchor war “*• 

SHI 


^Utah's Hooert bV-AO 
marine London SW1Y 

ri ng t ha a bora wfawitt. 
be adTwlEmua 


claim anateat o* 

bawfkdndr W 

aeato of Dr Ptaahpa llariwalla 

lata of 30 wood hold Mow 

London SWld 1LO who dlad on 

I tba 12th Oarr or January 1996 

and «ban trill one pmM In tha 

1 Principal RagMtxY o* tha hailr 

DMrfoa on tbe 3rd day of July 

1994 bY Dm MariwaBa and I 


don tba 2dtf> Bar of October 


LEGAL NOTICES 




rirto. the 


ess? ™ “J 


1996 el 10130. 


(ha 9tb dnr of 


31at DroIw 1996. by 
ion of Him or bar ma nln- 

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aptnyawM «Mi C anaa n Un- 

itod or otberwtea la hereby 

re quit ed to send particular* to 

witting of hie or bar claim or 

e nd t la nwm t to A 1 Cnaioa Eeu 

Canaan United, Convoys Wharf. 

Prince Strom. Deptford. »~—— 

SB8 3JH, redag tbr On Truatae 
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tfaTiMre not later then two 

after appearance of thia 

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Trustee windWtrlbata Uw - mi 

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t erlt la d t hr um ba rle y ngm 

only to tba e l ahna and radtlr 

wants of which the Tr 

bad Notice and *fll nor. in 

l a ap a ct of (ha a re ata to dhnrib- 

oad, be HeHo to any parson of 

claim or oimtlenwnt It 

at then hove bad Notice. 

Far Uw Canaoya Linritad Panelon 




u£tT of *be 

I ns olvency hex 1986 for a Part¬ 
nership Voluntary Ar rangeme nt 


zssizsss' 

RefcAM/MlBVOd . 



DIAMOND (ARCHITECTS) 
LIMITED 

THE INSOt-Vmurr ACT 1986 

2 ? arTO * Po»- 

98 of tbe Ineal- 


VobmtarrAn___ 

of tba Irwohency Act 1986. 

Credlram of tbe above- 

■hip way obtain, free of 



uamEwnoN) 

women TO SUBMI T PROOF 
OF DEBT 

NOTICE a HEREBY GIVEN, pm 
■war to Ralo 112(1) of ih 
Ineoivency Roles 1986, that tbe 

LboddMar of riw 


CAr rMt a rta ? lAntead trill be held 

at 1 b 2 Ra f tir o n d BoUdfawe 

GmYa inn. Louden WCMsStSi 

iTTon^o?v*u5^r 

vwacy Act 1986. 



Drin3^13 1 Aanai 1996 





LEGAL, PUBLIC, COMPANY 
& PARLIAMENTARY NOTICES 
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FLEA5Z TELEPHONE 

0171-782 7344 OR FAX: 0171-782 7827 

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NOTICE TO SUBMI T PROOF 
OF DEBT 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pur- 
nmnt to Role lUfl) of tba 
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_Act 1986 


Solution on page 42 






























































































































































































































































































































' : ; ^0 S p 7Cr OF PLAYERS’ ACTION CA 

Strike threatening 

to pull plug on 

League’s TV riches 


OF PL AYERS’ ACTION CASTS CLOUD OVER BRIGHTER OUTLOOK FOR FUTURE 


AFTER four years of beinp 
ignored, or lost in the byS 

ofre^onaltelevision.thVSa- 

ti on wide Football League re¬ 
turns to the narionTl^S 
tomorrow night. At last, after 
a penod of threatened penury 

S - --* Q5es extinction; 

2 - dubs have a chance to 
enjoy some of the riches tele- 
^siot has begun to put into 
die game. But for how lone? 
Looming on the horizon is the 
threat of a players' strike to 
put the hope of new prosperity 
in jeopardy. 

The state of the league is a 
matter for debate. It has 
become almost a cliche to 
point to the ever-widening gap 
between the elite of the Pr^ 
truer League and the have- 
nots, on and off the field. 

The report last weekend by 
Ddoitte & Touche, the accoun¬ 
tants, revealed that Nation¬ 
wide Football League clubs 
ware losing £23 million a year. 
The report clearly indicates 
the plight that Football League 
clubs are in when die percent¬ 
age of turnover generated by 
the 20 Premiership dubs is 69 
per cent, and for the 72 
Football League clubs it is 31 
per cent,” David Dent, the 
Football League secretary, 
said. 

Indeed, the only question is 
where to draw the line be¬ 
tween rich and poor, with 
some fairly strong arguments 
for putting it-haiiway up the 
FA Carling Premiership — in 
footballing, if not financial 
terms, anyway. 

Yet there have been some 
indications that the cold wind 
may be abating a little, if not 
changing direction. Sky Tele¬ 
vision's deal with the Football 
League, and the new sponsor¬ 
ship from Nationwide, pro¬ 
vide a little more margin for 
error in the lower ranks. 

There are also suggestions 
this year that standards on the 
fidd might be improving 
again, at least in the first 
division. “I think the league 
will be stronger this year,” JPat 
Nevin. die Tranmere Rovers 


By Peter Ball 

and Scotland winger and 

of me Professional 
Footballers' Association (PFA), 
said yesterday. 

“» y° u look at the 
calibre of manager this sea¬ 
son, with experienced manag¬ 
ers ike Howard Kendall, 
Mark McGhee. Terry 
Venables, if he is going to be 
properly involved at Ports¬ 
mouth. and younger interna¬ 
tionals like Ray Wilkins. 
Trevor Frands and John 



Nationwide 




Aldridge, and that is a change. 
They have watched Euro 96 
and those lessons will be 
learnt I don’t think there is the 
tactical naivety in this league 
that there was when I first 
came to Tranmere. 

“And there are better play¬ 
ers coming into the league. A 
couple of years ago, players 
were content to be fringe 
players at Premiership dubs, 
but now you see players like 
Mike Newell and Barry 
Home choosing to move down 
even though they could still 
play in the Premiership. And 
with the increasing number of 




■*_ - - 



Nevin; change 


top-level foreign players com¬ 
ing in, the standards of play¬ 
ers becoming available will 
improve loo " 

Yet Nevin, and it may be 
assumed the majority of his 

members, are prepared to put 
that vision of prosperity at 
risk. At the beginning of this 
week, the PFA executive decid¬ 
ed to send out ballot papers for 
a strike against the television 
games unless the League con¬ 
tinues to honour its old contri¬ 
bution to PFA funds. “Without 
being complacent. I would 
expect to get 95 per cent 
support.” Brendan Batson, the 
deputy chief executive of the 
PFA. said. “The dub chairmen 
have arbitrarily broken a 30- 
year-old agreement without 
consultation.” 

Since 1967 the Football 
League has contributed 
rouglJy JO per cent of its 
television income towards the 
education, insurance and be¬ 
nevolent funds of the PFA. 
When the Premier League was 
formed, and money from tele¬ 
vision increased dramatically, 
the League maintained dial 
system but the PFA had to 
threaten action, finally agree¬ 
ing a 10 per cent cut on the first 
£10 million, reducing to 5 per 
cent on each subsequent £10 
million. 

Now. with the Football 
League television income in¬ 
creasing dramatically as Sky 
pays a premium for a monop¬ 
oly on English dub football, 
the League is rethinking its 
commitment — and perhaps 
proving a useful stalking- 
horse for the Premiership, 
whose own. massive new deal 
would yield the PFA £9 million 
a year if the present system 
continued. 

For the Football League, the 
argument is now. “That 
money is essential to the 
existence of many dubs.” 
Andy Williamson, the Football 
League assistant secretary, 
said yesterday. 

With wage bills in the 
Football League increasing 
overall by 63 per cent in the 














v-, 

-• . •*: 


[jyisii 




Paul Furlong, whose £15 million signing by Bi rmingham City from Chelsea is an 
indication of the increasing wealth at the top of the Nationwide Football League 


four years since the split, there 
will be some sympathy for 
Williamson’s assertion that 
“the players and the PFA are 
the people and organisation 
who have benefited most from 
the increased money coming 
into the League. They have a 
surplus of UL2 million on 
those specified accounts”. 

It would be easier, though, 
to have more sympathy with 
the Football League argu¬ 
ments if its own first division 
had not proved as ready to 


sacrifice its weaker brethren, 
as the Premiership dubs had 
been. The first division threat¬ 
ened to split the League again 
last year to ensure that it got 
the lion’s share of the joint 
income. 

The threat worked, with the 
first division taking most of 
the pot of E35 million from 
television, sponsorship and 
pools money. Its clubs will 
receive approaching £1 million 
each, which may pale beside 
the money available to Pre¬ 


miership dubs, but is a size¬ 
able increase on previous 
years. 

With the Football League 
preparing to go to court if a 
strike is called, things could 
get nasty. “Our advice is that, 
under present legislation, it 
would be illegal” Williamson 
said. He will hope that the 
advice is better than it was 
when the League tried to stop 
the Football Association from 
‘ luring its dubs away to the 
Premier League. 


Leicester 
achieve 
Prior deal 
to stiffen 
the defence 

By Russell Kempson 

LEICESTER City strength¬ 
ened their FA Carling Pre¬ 
miership squad yesterday 
when they agreed to sign 
Spencer Prior, the Norwich 
City defender, for about 
£600,000. Provided Prior can 
agree personal terms, he will 
make his debut in Leicester's 
opening match of the season, 
away to Sunderland on 
Saturday. 

Martin O'Neil], the 
Leicester manager, used his 
friendship with Prior, 25, to 
lure him to Filbert Street 
When O’Neill was manager 
at Norwich, before resigning 
eight months ago. he intro¬ 
duced Prior into the firet team 
after the player had spent two 
years on the fringes. He kept 
his place in the wake of 
O’Neill's departure and was 
voted the supporters' player of 
the season at Cairow Road. 

However, for Mike Walker, 
the Norwich manager. Prior’s 
move is another setback to his 
preparations for the dub’s 
Nationwide League first divi¬ 
sion campaign. Walker, who 
signed Prior from Southend 
United during his first spell in 
charge at Norwich, has also 
lost Robert UUalhome and 
Marie Bowen on free transfers 
during the summer. He now 
has only five defenders with 
first-team experience to chose 
from for the game against 
Swindon Town on Saturday. 

Patrik Berger. Liverpool’s 
£3.25 minion signing from 
Borussia Dortmund, should 
be able to make his Premier¬ 
ship debut against Middles¬ 
brough on Saturday. His 
work permit is expected to be 
issued today, allowing 
Berger, who scored for the 
Czech Republic in their 2-1 1 
defeat against Germany in 
the final of Euro 96, to be 
registered in time for the trip 
to the Riverside Stadium. 

Roy Evans, the Liverpool 
manager, said: “It’s great 
news, especially if his regis¬ 
tration can beat the deadline 
for the Uefa Cup as well.” 
Evans also admitted he had 
made an unsuccessful effort 
to sign Steve Staunton, the 
former Liverpool and now 
Aston Villa defender. 


SPORT 41 

Gascoigne 
unlikely 
to be risked 
in Hoddle’s 
first game 

By Russell Kempson 

PAUL GASCOIGNE, of 
Rangers, will probably miss 
England’s opening World Cup 
qualifying match against Mol¬ 
davia in Kishinev on Septem¬ 
ber 1. Gascoigne, who played 
a prominent role in helping 
England to the semi-finals of 
Euro 96. has an Achilles 
tendon injury. 

"The problem is an awk¬ 
ward one," Walter Smith, his 
club manager, said yesterday. 
“We are taking him slowly 
through training so there is no 
recurrence of the injury." 

Gascoigne seems unlikely to 
play in the first team before 
the game against Dundee 
United at Ibrox on August 24 
— 48 hours after Glenn 
Hoddle. the new England 
coach, announces his squad 
for the game in Moldavia. 

If Hoddle derides to omit 
Gascoigne from his first inter¬ 
national party, it would 
strengthen the chances of a 
recall for Matthew Le Tissier. 
of Southampton. 

Rangers, who have dropped 
their interest in Alessandro 
Orlando, the Udinese defend¬ 
er. have been told by Uefa. 
that their European Cup pre¬ 
liminary round second-leg 
match against Alania 
Vladikavkaz, of Russia, will go 
ahead next Wednesday. 

Vladikavkaz is situated only 
15 miles from the border with 
Chechnya, which has seen 
renewed fighting between 
Russian troops and Chechen 
separatists in recent weeks. 

Moscow had been men¬ 
tioned as a possible alternative 
venue but. after taking advice 
from the Foreign Office and 
the Alania club yesterday. 
Uefa's dub competitions sub¬ 
committee gave the game the 
all-clear. 

“It will go ahead as 
planned,” a Uefa spokeswom¬ 
an said yesterday. “We are 
satisfied that the security ar¬ 
rangements are such that, 
given all the information we 
had, the venue did not need to 
be switched." 

Rangers, who lead 3-1 from 
the first leg, will travel to 
Austria on Monday for a stop¬ 
over before Dying on to south¬ 
ern Russia. 




CLUB-BY-CLUB GUIDE TO THE NATIONWlCE LEAGUE > * 




Barnsley 

Pteyor-manager Danny Wison (Bp- 
pointed June 1994). 

IN: M Appleby (DarSngton, £200,000). P 
WBdnson (Middesbrough, free). 

OUT: A Payton (Huddersfield. 
£350.000). O Arch dea con (Curtate, 
tree). D Brooke (Scarborough, free). R 
Handy (Scarborough, free). 5 Bochenskl 
(Scarborough, loan). C Bishop (Wigan. 
£20.000), LButler (Wigan, tree). 
Championship odds: 33-1. 

Birmingham City 
(Manager Trevor Frands (May 199®. 
IN: SBnice (Man Utd. free). B Home 
(Everton, £250.000), G Ablett {Everton, 
£400.000). P Furlong (Chelsea. Cl.5m), 
M Nawefl (Blackburn. £775.000). 

OUT: P PesdtaoSdo West BromwwSi. 
£600,000) R Foreyth (S»ke. £200,000). 
S Black (Doncaster, tree). P ChaBnor 
(Uncofn. non-contract) 

Championship odds: 7-1. 

Bolton Wanderers 

Manager Colin Todd iJan 19S6). 

IN: M Johansen and P Frandser (FC 
Copenhagen, combined). 

OUT: A Stubbs (Celtic. £3.5m). 
C ha mpionship odds: 12-1. 

Bradford City 

Manager. Chris Kamara (Nov 1995) 

IN: E Ragtop (Heeremean, im- 
dsetosed). C Scott (Rangers, tree). M 
Sas (NAC Breda, free). G Cowans 
(Sheffield United, free) 

OUT: N Totson (York, undisclosed). 
Championship odds: 33-1. 

Charlton Athletic 

KSSpSJSS’. 
irnCTsS' ^ l 

Bowyer (Leeds. £2.6frgT P 'MOarre: 
(BanaL free). P Garland (Leyl gn Or ient, 
free). C Whyte (UMon Otert. free) 
Championship odds: 25-1. 

Crystal Palace 

Manager Dave Basset! (Feb 1996). 

Maddfson (Sou ftgrn pjgg. 
£450.000), K Muscat (South Metooune, 

oj/T°S Taylor (Hednesfard. free).D 
Matthews (Sumley ESSbOOJ. N Martyn 
(Leeds United, £225m). « wlmor 

SESSToSg-*, 


ager Brian Laws (Nov 

(Noam Forest, £25,000), T 
(Southampton- £300,OOT). 
Suves (West Bromwfch. 
f Boneffi (Tranmere, un- 
3 Fraser flJncoln. free). 

Np OddK 5B-T. 

field Town 

nan Hoito) (June «g,’ 
rt (Bristol Rovers, El 2m). A 

tstey. £350.000). A Momson 

oth (sSeld VjMneadv. 
jpson (Bviy. E40J300), 


Burtey (Dec 1994V 
SS tmal. BMI> 


j odds: 30-1. 


n Ban (JuV 1995) - 

rx&S 

f D ten (Mansfield. 


\ Walker (June 19961 

*ar 

7^(Scai«^ h - 


Oldham Athletic 

Player-manager Graeme Sharp (Nov 
IN: none. 

OUT: P Garrard (Everton. £1 5m). 
Championship odds: 50-1. 

Oxford United 

Manager. Dares Stfflth (Sept 1993). 

IN: NJemson (Notts County, £60,000) 
OUT: C Aten (Nottingham Forest, 
£350,000), D CuWp (Fulham, tree). 
Championship odds: 40-1. 

Portsmouth 

Player-manager Terry Femrick (Feb 


1995) 

IN: R Simpson (Tottenham 


undtedosad}. P 


Hotspur, 
ran Bet- 


(Parttean 


OUT: J Gfitens (Torquay, tree) 
Championship odds. 60-1. 

Pbrt Vale 

Manager John Rudge (Mar 1964). 

IN: none. 

OUT: none. 

Championship odds: 40-1 
Queens Park Rangers 

Player-manager Ray WilWns (Nov 

1994). 

IN: P Murray [Cartste Untied. £300.000). 
S Slade (Tottenham Hotspur. £350.000). 
OUT: G Goodridge and S Dytetra 
(Bristol City. £100.000 combmed). J 
Cross (Cantlt, free). 

Championship odds: 4-1. 

Reading 

Joint player-managers: Mid« Gooding 
and ivfcfcy Quinn (&n 1995) 

IN: P Bodln (Swindon Town, tree). B 

Hunter (Wrexham. £400,000). _ 

OUT: A Williams (Wolves, £750.000) 
Championship odds: 66-1 

Sheffield United 

Manager Howard Kendall (Dae 1995). 
IN: N Spaceman (Chelsea, tree). L 
SandfordfiSokfl CSty. £500.000). 

OUT: G Cowans (Bradford City. tree). G 
Innas (Darlington, tree) 

Championship odds: 7-1 

Southend United 

Player-manager Ronnie Whelan (July 


OUT^R WHBs (Peterborough Untied, 
undisclosed). M Hone ilincotn City. 

Gtenpionship odds. 66-1 

Stoke City 

Swa 

£500 000). G Potior (Southampton. 
Ertxinal). R SJndar (Chester Csy.free)- 
r MdJonald (Hartlepool United, to- 
(W (Northampton 

Championship a*** 25 ‘ 1 • 

S2£SE2-----*- 

19&) 

IN: F Darras (Basha. tree)- p 

g£a3L*s*B°saja-- 

boroucr. free). , _ . 
Championship odds: 25-1 

Tranmere Rovers 

Player-manager John Aldridge (Apr 

UnLefli (Gnmstiy. undisclosed) 

OUT: none _. , 

Championship odds: 33-1. 

Sr?; C Hargreaves (Hereford, free). A 


OUTi C teOTsaves iwretoru, - 
Wolverhampton vv ^ d ,^? rs 


IgfjgggTgiyjSjotr 

Blackpool 

Manager Gary Megson (apootrned 
July 1996) 

IN: B Dixon (Lincoln City, £20,000). T 
Sutter (GtSingham £225.000). G Brabrn 
(Bwy. £200.000). 

OUT: A Morrison (Huddersfield Town. 
£500.000). C Beech (Hartlepool Unt¬ 
ied. tree). A Gouck (Rochdale, free). 
P Homer (Southport, free). N Mitchell 
(Macdesftetd Town, free). R Wars 

Qw^ici^od^ 12-1. 

Bournemouth 

Manager. Mel Machm (Sept 1994) 

IN: M Watson (West Ham United, free). 
L Coneril (Ipswich Town, tree). D 
Gordon (West Ham United, tree). 

OUT: S Jones (West Ham United. 
£200.000). P Mitchell (Torquay United, 
tree). Jamie Victory (Finland, free) 
Championship odds: 33-1 

Brentford 

Manager DsvkJ Webb (May 1993) 

IN: M McPherson (West Ham United, 
uncSsdosed). S MyaU (Brighton and 
Hove Albion, undsetosed). K Dennis 
(Arsenal, free). R Goddard (Crawley 
Town, tree) 

OUT: none. 

Championship odds: 20-1 

Bristol City 

Manner Joe Jordan (Nov 1994) 

IN: G Goodndge and S Dykslra 
(Queens Park Rangers, £100.000 com¬ 
bined). S Goater (Rotherham Unfled. 
£175.000), M Bohoto (unattached, 
free). S Naylor (West Bromwich Albion, 
freei. 

OUT: R Dryden (Southampton. 
El50,000). M Bryant (GdDngham. 
£65,000). j Fowler (Cardrfl Crty. 
nominal). W Brown (Weston-super- 
Mare. free). D Huggrs (Barry Town, 
tree) 

Championship odds: 20-1 

Bristol Rovers 

Player-manager Ian Holloway (M3y 
1996) 

IN: M Lockwood (Queen's Park Rang¬ 
ers. tree). L Martin (Celtic, free). & 
Pamnenter (Queens Park Rovers, free). 
G Power (Queens Park Ranoers. free) 
OUT: M Stawart (Huddersfield Town. 
£ 1 .200,000), I Wright [Hull City. free). J 
Charming (Leyton Orient, free). W 
Stirling (Lincoln. Iree), M Daws (Bath 
City. free). I McLean (Canada, free) B 
Parkin (Wycombe Wanderers. Iree). M 
Hall (Doncaster Rovers, free). P Tcvey 
(Bath City, free), M Wyatt (Bath City, 
free). 

Championship odds: 16-1 

Burnley 

Manager Adrian Heath (Mar 1996) 

|N: D Matthew (Crystal Palace. 
£65,0000). N Gtegtmm (Stoke Cay. 
tree). V Overson (Soke City, free) 
OUT: G Davies {Hartlepool Town. Iree). 
W Joyce (Hull City, freei. W Dowefl 
(Rochdale, freei. G Dugdate (Bamber 
firidge, free). J Francis (Scunthorpe 
United, free). N Peel (Rotherham 
United, free). 

Championship odds: 16-1. 

Bury 

Manager Sian Temant (Sept 1995). 
IN: R Jepson (Huddersfield Town. 
£40,000), P Butter (Rochdale. 
£100.000). G Armstrong (Sunderland, 
free) 

OUT: D Lancaster (Rochdale, tree). M 
Serton Scunthorpe United, free), G 
Brabtn (Blackpool. £200.0001. P Taylor 
(Bamber Bndi^. free). 

Championship odds: 26-1. 

Chesterfield 

Manager. John Duncan (Feb 1S83). 
IN; C Beaumont (Stockport County. 
£30.000). 

OUT: D Roberts (Darfngton. Iree). D 
Moss (Scunthorpe United, free). 
Championship odds: 16-1. 

Crewe Alexandra 

Manager Dario Gradi (Jun 19831 
IN: N Cutter (Weti Bromwich Albion. 


unctaaosed). C Coffey (Arsenal, free). 
B Launders (Crystal Palace, free), J 
Moralee (Watford, free). R Kirby {Pres¬ 
ton North End. non-contract) 

OUT: W Coffins (Sheffield Wednesday, 
£550.000), D Hawtin (Sfigo Rovers, 
tree). 

Championship odds: 14-1. 

Gillingham 

Manager Tony Pufis (July 1995). 

IN: A Hessan thaler (Warlord. 

£250.000). M Bryant (Bristol City. 
£65,000). L Pper (Wimbledon. 
£40.000) 

OUT: D Martin [Leyton Orient, free). D 
Freeman (Fulham. £15,000), P 
Petlinger (Carfsle United, free). P 
Watson (Fuham. £13.0001, A Foster 
(Herelord United, fieei, D Naylor 
(Leyton Orient, free). T Butler (Black- 
poo), £225.000), G MicMewhite (Slough 
Town, free) 

Championship odds: 25-1 
Luton Town 

Manager Lennie Lawrence (Dec 

1995). 

IN: none 

OUT: J VUsmjp (Aarhus. £100.000). D 
Greene (Colchester Unfled. £30.000), 
S Oat-es Sheffield Wednesday. 
£425.000). V Ffiseth (Ure:. £90.000). 
Championship odds: 14-1 

Millwall 

Manager Jimmy NichoM (Feb 1996) 
IN: S Crawford. J Dar and D Sinclair 
(Raith Rovers. £1 1m combined). P 
Haittev (Hamilton, £400,000), D Nuse 
(Manchester City. free). 

OUT: A Rae (Sunderland. £750.000). B 
Thatcher (Wimbledon. £1.890.000). M 
Bennett (CartSR City. Ireej 
Championship odds: 9-2 

Notts County 

Manager Steve Thompson (June 
1995) 

IN: none. 

OUT: N Jemson (Cbdord Unned, 
£60.000). P Butter (West Bromwich 
Albion. £175.0001, D Kelly (Kettering 
Town. free). J Marsha# (Eastwood, 
free). S Wlson (Whitley Bay. free) 
Championship odds: 12-1. 
Peterborough United 
Manager Mck Hateall (Dec 1995). 

IN: M O'Connor (Walsall, tribunal). S 
Houghton (Walsall, tribunal). Z Rowe 
lChdsea, free). A Boothroyd (Mans¬ 
field Town, free) S Welsh (Patrick, 
free). D Payne (Watford, undisclosed). 
R WHIis (Soflhend Uld. undisclosed). 
M Botfiey (Southend Utd. £75,000). 
OUT: G Rtoch (Hu# City, free), A Fumetl 
(Rushden and Dramonds. freei. 

Championship odds: 16-1 

Plymouth Argyle 

Manager Nefl Wamock (June 1995) 
ffib B Grobbelaar (Southamptnn. un¬ 
disclosed). T James (Herelord United, 
tribunal). 

OUT: I Baird (Brighton and Hove 
Afbwn. £35,000], K Hill (Rochdale, 
free). S McCall (Torquay Untied, tree). 
S Cherry (Rotherham Untied, Iree). 
Championship odds: 20-1. 

Preston North End 

Manager Gary Peters (Dec 1994) 

IN: M Holt (Blackburn Rovers. Iree) 
OUT: J Vaughan (Lncoln City. free). A 
Fensom (Rochdale, free). C Borwtch 
iSouthpoit, free) 

Championship odds: 14-1. 

Rotherham United 

Joint managers: Archie GemmSI and 
John McGovern (%X 1994) 

IN: J McDougaU (Brighton and Hove 
Altvon. £50.0OM. S Slawson (Mansfield 
Town, free). L Glover (Port Vale. 
£150.000). S Cherry (Plymouth Arqyte, 
Iree). J Dobbin (Gnmsby Town. Iree). D 
Fe3ft>n (Bamslev. free). N Peel (Bum 
ley. tree], B Sandyman (Pert Vale. Iree) 
OUT: 0 Davison (Halifax, Iree), 5 


i (Halifax, Iree). S 
Goater (Bristol Crtv. El 75.000). M Clark 
(Sheffield Wednesday. £325,000). N 
Vjlpen (New Zealand, tree), C 
Bouckem (New Zealand, free) 
Championship odds: 33-1 

Shrewsbury Town 

Manager Fred Davies (May 19*3). 

IN: none. 

OUT: T Clarke (W«on. free). L Martin 
(Teilord. free). D Simkin (Tenord. tree). 
C Withe fBoston. tree) 


Championship odds: 50-1 

Stockport County 

Manager: Dave Jones (Mar 1995). 

IN: P Jones (Wolverhampton Wander¬ 
ers. £60,000), D Searte (Carcfitl City, 
free). 

OUT: M Oliver (Darlington, free), M 
Dickens (Lincoln City, non-contract). C 
Beaumont (Chesterfield. £30.000), 
P Johnson (Barry Town, free) 
C ha m pi onship odds: 25-1 

Walsall 

Manager Chris Nichol (Sept 1994) 
Championship odds: 25-1. 

IN: none. 

OUT: M O'Connor (Peterborough Uni¬ 
ted. tribunal), S Houghton (Peter 
borough United, tribunal). G Brart 
(Hednesford Town. free). 

Watford 

Manager Kenny Jacket! (May 1996) 
Chamberlain [Sunderland. 


Manager Kenny Jacket! (May 1996) 
IN: A Chamberlain [Sunderland. 
£40.000). S Talboys (Wimbledon, free). 
R Flash (Wolverhampton Wanderers, 
tree) 

OUT: D Barnes (Colchester United, 
lr»»). D Payne (Peterborough Untied, 
undisclosed). A Hessenthater (GIBIng¬ 
ham. £250.0001. J Moralee (C-rewe 
Alexandra, free). P Wflkerson (Slough 
Town, free), R Marshal (Kettering 
Town. tree). J Whn^ (Hendon, free). 
'Championship odds: 7-2. 
Wrexham 

Manager Brian Flynn (Nov 1999). 

IN: B Caey (Leicester City. £100.000). 
S Gallagher (Prescot Town, free). 
OUT: B Hunter (Reading. £400,000) 
Championship odds: 20-1 
Wycombe Wanderers 
Manager Alan Smith (Jin 1985). 

IN: P McCarthy (Brighton and Hove 
Albion. £100.000). B Parian (Bristol 
Rovers, free) 

OUT: P Hardyman (Barnet- free), S 
Gainer (Woking, free). T Howard 
(Woking, free). S Stapleton (Slough 
town, tree), S Stevens (Stevenage 
Borough, free). 

Championship odds: 20-1. 

York City 

Manager Alan Little (Mar 1993) 

IN: N Totem (Bradford City. tree). 

OUT: N Pevereil (Gateshead, free) 
Championship odds: 50-1 


Barnet 

Manager Ray Ctemencs (appointed 
Jan 1994). 

IN: P Hardy ma n (Wycombe WandBtare. 
tree). L Harrison (Fulham, free), P 
WHframs (Chariton Ath, free) 

OUT: A Dyer (Cambridge Utd, trfcunafi. 
M Cooper (Northampton Town, tree), T 
Robin (Boreham Wood, free), P Scoff 
(Aylesixiy Uld. free). 

Championship odds: 10-1 

Brighton 

Manager Jimmy Case (New 1995). 

IN: I Baird (Plymouth Argyle. £35,000). J 
Peake (Rochdale, tribunsri). D Allan 
(Southampton, free) 

OUT: P McCarthy (Wycombe Wander¬ 
ers, tribunal). S Myall (Brentford, un¬ 
disclosed), J McDougald (Rotherham 
Utd, £50,000), D Goughian (Ireland, 
tree). S Munday (Dover Athletic, free), l 
Chapman (Grlkngham. free). 
Championship odds: 16-1 

Cambridge United 

Manager Tommy Taylor (April 1995) 

IN: G Brazil (Fuham. tree). P Buckle 
(Tarcjjay Utd. trbunal). P Wonlass 
(Uncofri City. free). D Williamson 
(Motherwell. Iree). A Dyer (Barnet, 
tribunal) 

OUT: M Davies (Rushden and Di¬ 
amonds. £6.000). A Jeffrey (Cambridge 
City. Iree). C Mkkfleton (Kettering, free). 
Championship odds: 28-1 

Cardiff City 
Manager PhD Neal (Jan 1996) 

IN: J Fowler (Bristol City, nominal), J 
Cross (OPR. free). T EHoH (Carlisle Utd. 
free). K Lloyd (Herelord Utd. free). 

OUT: D Adams (Aldershot, free). D 
Brazil (Newport AFC, free), D Wiliams 


(Ltofretd. heel. D Searte (Stockport 
County, tree). 

Championship odds: 14-1. 

Carlisle United 

Manager Mervyn Day (Jan 1996). 
ChampionDhip odds: 8-1. 

IN: S Pounewatchy (Gueugnon. un¬ 
disclosed), O Archdeacon (Barnsley, 
free). S Heath (Leeds Utd. tree). P 
Petting&r (GlTraham. Iree) 

OUT: T Ettot (Cardtff City. free). G 
Bennett (Scarborough, tree). 

Chester City 

Manager Kevin RatcStfe (May 1995) 

IN: R Sinclair (Stoke City. free). M 
Woods-(Everton. free) 

OUT: E Bishop (Horthwtch Victoria, 
tree), D Ryan (Baity Town, free). B 
Slewed (Southport, free) 

Championship odds: 16-1. 

Colchester United 

Manager Steve Wlgnafl (Jan 1995). 

IN: □ Barnes (Watford, free). D &eene 
(Luton Town. £30.000). R Wffldns (Her¬ 
eford Utd. free). 

OUT; T Dennis (Lincoln City. free). 
Championship odds: 14-1. 

Darlington 

Manager Jim Platt (Dec 1995). 

IN: B Atkinson (Sunderland, free), L 
Brydon (Liverpool, free). D Fsiflkner 
(Sheffield Weds, free). G tones (Sheffield 
Utd. bee). M Oliver (Stockport Co, free). 
□ Roberts (Chesterfield, free). 

OUT: M Appleby (Barnsley. £200.000). 
P Mattteon (Gutsetey. free). 
Champio n s hi p odds: 10-1. 

Doncaster Rovers 

Manager Sammy Chung (Jiiy 1994) 

IN: M McDonald (Southport, urv 
dteckxsd). S Water (Btym Spartans, 
undedosad), S Black (Briningham City, 
tree). P Brch [Wolves, tree), S Pierce 
(Wolves, free). 

OUT: G Jones (Wigan AtNetie. 
£150.000). S Parrish (Northampton 
Town. £35.000). K Ashley (Tettord Utd, 
tree). R Kirby (Preston North End. non- 
contract). 

Championship odds; 25-1 

Exeter City 

Player-manager Peter Fox puna 

1996) 

IN: A Bayes (Torquay Utd. tree). M Dally 
(Dundee Utd. tree). J Sharpe 
[Manchester City. free). T Steele (Her¬ 
eford Utd. free). 

OUT: M Cooper (Hantepool. free). M 
Cecere (Rochdale, free), M Came (Wtos- 
kvd Utd, free). N Parsley (Witton Albion, 
free), A Thirty (Tiverton Town, Iree). 
Championship odds; 33-1 

Fulham 

Player-manager Mcky Adams (Feb 

ttS'SMM (Sheffield Weds, free), D 
Cufllp (Osdord Utd. free). G Cocker* 
(Leyton Orient, free). D Freemen 
Gflfcaham. £15,000). P Watson 
(Gdngham, £13,000), M Wation 
(Fakonham Town. free). 

OUT; D Jtxto (Wimbledon. £200.000), L 
Hamson (Barnet, tree), G Brazil (Cam¬ 
bridge Uld. free). D Bolt (Slough, tree) 
Qiampionship Odds: 20-1 

Hartlepool United 

Ptayef-manager Keith Houchan (April 
19%) 

IN: C Beech (Blackpool, tree). D Clegg 
(Liverpool, free). M Cooper (txater City, 
free). G Davies (Bumtey, tree). S Pears 
(Liverpool, free). 

OUT; P Coni on (Sunderland, free) 
Championship odds: 40-1. 

Hereford United 

Manager Graham Turner (Aug 1995). 
IN: A pebont (Wolves, free). A Faster 

B ingham, tree). I Foster (Liverpool. 

). C Hargreaves (West &om. tree). G 
Mahon (Wolves, free). D Norton (North¬ 
ampton Town. free). O Townsend 
(Wolves, frea) 

OUT; S WarkBs (Mansfield Town, free). 
S While (Cardfl City, free), T Janes 
(Plymouth Aigyte, tribunal). K Lloyd 
(Cart&fl City. free). R Writers (Cotcheeier 
Utd, iree). J Steele (Exeter City, free), M 
Naylor (T afford Utd, free). 
Championship odds: 11-1. 

Hull City 

Manager Terry Dolan (Jan 1691). 

IN: A Brian (West Bran, free), A Brown 


(Leeds Uld. tree). A Doncel (Deporttwo 
La Coruna, free). B Greaves iBngq 
Town. free). W Joyce (Burnley, free). G 
ftoch (Peterborough Uld. free). I Wright 
(Bristol Rovers, free) 

OUT: G Abbott (Guseley. free), S Insiey 
(Whitley Bay. free). G Humphries (Gains¬ 
borough Trinity, bat). 

Championship odds: 20-1 

Leyton Orient 

Manager Pat Holland (April 1995) 

IN: A Maittn (West Ham Utd. free), L 
Seatey (West Ham Utd. tree). D Martin 
(GiBngham. free), M Ung (Swindon 
Town. tree). J Cham mg (BnsioJ Rovers, 
free). P Garland (Chariton Athletic, free), 

D Naylor (GiMngham. £20,000). 

OUT; G Cockerill (Futwn. free). K 
Austin [Lncoln City. £30.000). D Puree 
(Oxford Utd. £100.000). 

Championship odds: 14-1. 

Lincoln City 

Manager John Bat* (Oct 1996) 

IN: KAustin (LeytonOrient. £30.000). T 
Dennis [Colchester Utd, free). S Fraser , 
(Grimsby Tcwn, free). M Hone (South- 1 
end Utd, free). W Sterling (Bristol 
Rovers, free). J Vaughan (Preston NE. 
free), P ChaHnor (Blrmlnjjiam City, non- 
confrad). M Dickens (Stockport County, 
non-coraract), G Dobbs (Wimbledon, 
norvcontract). 

OUT: T Daws [Scarborough, free), B 
Dixon (Blackpool. £20.000), P Wantess 
[Cambridge Uld. free). A Johnson 
(Hong Kong, tree). T Mudd (HaMax 
Town, free). 

Championship odds: 25-1. 

Mansfield Town 


IN: S wratkiBS (Herelord Utd. free), D 
Kerr (Manchester City. £20.000) 

OUT: A Boothroyd (Peterborough Uld, 
free). S Slawson (Rotherham Ufa, free). 
Champton^ttp odds: 33-1 

Northampton Town 

Manner Ian AW ns (Jan 1996). 

IN: S Parrish (Doncaster Rovers, 
£35.000). M Cooper (Barnet, tree), l 
Clarkson (Stoke City, free), S Rennie 
(Coventry City, free) 

OUT: G WHams (Scarborough, free). D 
Norton (Hereford Utd, tree). 
Championship odds: 14-1. 

Rochdale 

Manager Graham Barrow (May 1996). 
Chamnionshio odds: 33-1 
IN?WDmS(Bumley. free). R Fensome 
(Preston NE. free). I Farrefi (Wigan 


Alhteuc free). K Hfl {Plymouth Argyle. 
free). D Lancaster (Bury. free). M 
Leonard [Wigan Athletic, free). 

OUT: I Thompslone (Scarborough, 
free). P Butler (Buy. £100.000). CCtivke 
IChorley. free). J Hardy (Rhyl. free). P 
Moulden (Accmgion Stanley, free). J 
Peake (Brighton. Irtounafl. J Proctor 
IChorley. freej 

Scarborough 

Manager Mick Wadsworth (June 1996). 
IN: G Williams (Northampton Town, 
free), T Daws (Lincoln City, free). G 
Bennett (Carlisle Utd. free). D Brooke 
(Barnsley, tree). R Hanby (Barnsley, 
free). J Mtchefl (Norwich City. tree). I 
Thompstone (Rochdale, free). G Wil¬ 
liams (Northampton Town, free), B 
Won a* (Swindon Town. free). S 
Bochenskl (Barnsley, loan). 

OUT: K Magee (Dundee Uld. un- 
tiscJosed). S Charles (SlaJybndge 
Cetiic, free). D Rage (HaK® Town, free) 
Championship oods: 66-1. 

Scunthorpe United 
Manager Mick Buxton (March 1996). 

IN: D Moss (Chesterfield, free). M Serton 
(Bury, free). K Jackson (Sheffield 

Wednesday non-contract). 

OUT: T Ford (Barrow, free). 
Champtonsfrapoddc 20-1. 

Swansea City 

Player-manager Jan Mol by (Feb 1996) 
IN: J Morelia (Benfica. £50.000). R 
Ap^ebyjlpswtch Town. free). 

OUT: D Bamhouse (Merthyr Tydfil, Iree) 
Championship odes; 13-2. 

Torquay United 

Player-coach: Kevin Hodges (June 
1996). 

IN: P Adcock (Bath Cfty. free). J ©flans 
(Portsmouth, tree). P Mrichefi (Bonne- 
mouth. free). G Nelson (Chariton Ath¬ 
letic, free). 

OUT: G Monk (Southampton. Iree). A 
Bayes (Exeter City, tree), R Coughlin 
(Dorchester Town. tree). T KaSy (Wey¬ 
mouth, iree). 

Championship odds: 66-1 

Wigan Athletic 

Manner John Deehan (Oct 1995) 

IN: G Jones (Doncaster Rovers. 
£150.000). S Morgan (Coventry City, 
frea). C Bishop (Barnsley. £20.000), L 
Butter (Barnsley, tree) 

OUT: A Farrell (Rochdale, freej, M 
Leonard (Rochdale, free), D Me Kearney 
(Morecambe, free). D MUter (Moce- 
cambe. free). 

Championship odds: 5-1 


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42 SPORT/RADIO 


Amundsen blazes trail for sporting giants 



W hat would you guess 
most people would rate 
as the most impressive 
sporting record of the 
2Dth century? The breaking of the 
four-minute mile barrier in 1954 
perhaps? The winning of the Tour de 
France five times in a row by Miguel 
Indur&in? The dutch of gold medals 
carried off by Carl Lewis? The 
victories in the Winter Olympic 
slalom three times in a row by 
Alberto Tomba? 

The answer, accord- _ 

ing to a new Europe- 
wide survey of sporting 
heroes, is rather more 
startling. It is a perfor¬ 
mance set up long be¬ 
fore the hype of 

television coverage, _ 

long before the idea 
that a sportsman's greatest ambition 
was to be turned by sponsors and 
agents into a millionaire. It was the 
achievement of being the first man to 
reach the South Pole, a race won in 
1911 by the Norwegian explorer. 
Roald Amundsen. 

The survey was dreamt up by 
DuPont, the chemical, fibres and oil 
giant, as its contribution to the great 
summer of sport. It asked Gallup 
pollsters to find out what people in 
Western Europe regard as the most 
impressive sporting achievements of 
the 20th century. They talked to 


‘Local heroes 
fill all the 
top places’ 


almost 5.000 people in Britain, 
France, Germany, Italy and Spain. 
The findings give a revealing insight 
not only into what makes a sporting 
hero, but also into the minds of die 
public who cast their votes. 

Delightfully, for a survey that was 
carried out entirely in Europe, the 
overall accolade for the greatest 
individual sports person of the centu¬ 
ry went to a Brazilian — Brit He was 
followed in the roil of honour by a 
Spanish cyclist, Indurdin, an Italian 
_ skier. Tomba, a Brazil¬ 
ian racing driver, 
Ayrton Senna, an 
American boxer, Mu¬ 
hammad Ali, and then 
that great Norwegian 
explorer again, sur- 
prtsingly getting in 
ahead of the likes of 
Lewis and Michael Schumacher. But 
whether such a survey can really tell 
anything about what makes a hero is 
doubtful and when the results are 
broken down nation by nation, the 
nonsense of the voting shows 
through. Invariably and predictably, 
national heroes fill all the top places. 

Wien asked for their views on the 
most impressive performances in 
winter sports, for example, the Ger¬ 
mans voted three Germans top. the 
Italians three Italians, the French 
and Spanish one each of their 
countrymen. Even the British (never 



reckoned to be strong in winter 
sports) voted our own into the top 
spots —Torvill and Dean, and Robin 
Cousins. 

It was the same story when it came 
to voting for the most impressive 
sports personality of the century. The 
French put three of their own into the 
top places, foe Germans two. 

Ask a Spaniard who is the greatest 
individual sportsman in the world 
and he will tell you it is Indurdin. Ask 
a German to name the greatest team 
player and you find it is Franz 
Beckenbauer. Ask a Frenchman to 
rank motor racing drivers and Alain 
Prost comes out on top. 

The British are guilty of chauvin¬ 
ism, too, but the results show them to 
be more generous than most. Al¬ 
though Sebastian Coe was a clear 
winner as the most impressive track 


and field athlete. Britain voted Lewis 
second and our top eight also 
includes Emil Zatopek, Jesse Owens, 
Sergey Bubka and Abe be Bikila. 
Interestingly. Linford Christie does 
not get a look in on the fist of the most 
famous athletes, as seen through the 
eyes of the British public. 

Of course, the only thing that 
surveys such as this really tell us 
about sports fans is that nations 
make a great fuss of their winners, 
their own national heroes — but the 
pollsters should try 
telling that to die se¬ 
nior partner of our only 
gold medal-vanning 
team in Atlanta, Steve 
Redgrave. Short of 
rowing to the South 

Bile, it is difficult to see _ 

what more Redgrave 

could have done to capture the 

imagination of the sporting public. 

He took his fourth gold medal at 
the Olympics to become Britain's 
most successful Olympian ever — 
only to find that, on his triumphant 
return home this week, he was met by 
just six people, and they were aU 
members of his family. 

There was just a single Union'Jack 
draped over a barrier in the arrivals 
lounge at Gaiwick — and that had 
been brought by his mother. 
Redgrave, granite-faced as ever, said 
he was disappointed but not sur- 


The British 
are more 
generous’ 


prised. “I've yet to receive any 
acknowledgement of what I 
achieved.” he said. “In Dublin, the 
Irish President was there to greet 
Michelle Smith. That is how they 
treat their athletes. 1 didn’t get so 
much as a note from John Major. We 
need to deride in this country 
whether we want a team of winners 
or not" 

He does seem to have a point 
Smith, the Irish swimmer who 
amazed the world by carrying off 

_ three gold medals, was 

greeted by a crowd 
reported to be 50.000- 
strong, a red carpet, a 
presidential reception 
and the full Dublin 
party. 

_ There are, apparent¬ 
ly, plans afoot to give 
Redgrave a civic reception when he 
goes bade to Marlow, where they 
know a thing or two about rowing. 
Let's hope they do it in style. Eighty- 
four years ago. when Amundsen 
went back to Norway after his 
journey to the Pole, he was greeted by 
rapturous crowds, a full-scale ban¬ 
quet and accolades from the Norwe¬ 
gian king. George V. 

They did nor need opinion polls to 
tell them how to greet a hero in those 
days. 

John Bryant 


CRICKET: PAKISTANIS FIND BATTING A STRUGGLE ON WORN PITCH AT GRACE ROAD 

Leicestershire spinners call tune 

HUGH ROUT »=r»«F 


LEICESTER (first day of 
three; Pakistanis won toss): 
Leicestershire, with nine first- 
innings wickets in hand, are 
193 runs behind the 
Pakistanis 

RELATIONS between Eng¬ 
land and Pakistan this sum¬ 
mer have been so cordial that 
it would be a shame to spoil 
the atmosphere, but anyone 
with a suspicious mind could 
easily have come up with a 
conspiracy theory yesterday. 

If part of England's strategy 
towards winning the final Test 
and squaring the series was to 
deprive Pakistan of the mean¬ 
ingful batting practice the}' 
need in between playing on a 
Yorkshire pudding of a pitch 
at Headingley. and the fastest 
surface in the land at the Oval, 
they could not have made a 
much better job of it. 

The Pakistanis were asked 
to play on a Grace Road pitch 
which had been used three 
times this season, once for a 
Benson and Hedges Cup 
game in May and twice recent¬ 
ly for Sunday league matches. 
Not surprisingly, they strug¬ 
gled to reach a total of 221 with 
the Leicestershire spinners. 
Brunson and Pierson, taking 
seven wickets between them. 

The official explanation was 
that, with three pitches out of 
use because they have been 
relaid, Leicestershire are run¬ 
ning out of strips to play on. 
The Pakistanis did not seem to 
mind too much. After ali. 
anything Pierson and 
Brunson could do, their own 


By Pat Gibson 

spinners, Mushtaq Ahmed 
and Saqlain Mushtaq, were 
likely to do rather better. 

Leicestershire were without 
their captain, Whitaker, and 
their vice-captain, Simmons, 
both trying to get fully fit for 
the more serious business of 
trying to win the county 
championship, while their 
England bowler, Mullally, 
was having a rest 

It looked as though Millns 
was keen to join them when he 
left the field after bowling one 
over but such a cynical 
thought was promptly dis¬ 
pelled when the physiothera¬ 
pist took his place as twelfth 


SCOREBOARD 


PAKISTAN: Fust tmngs 

Shartab Kab* b Brtmson . . . ..25 

Stand Amur c Moot b MiBns . 1 

Saeed Anwar w Niton b Bnmsan .22 

•Aarrw Satial b Bronson_ . . 30 

Satan MaK c Parsons b Parson .32 

Asd Uu(iaba c Smth b Pieraon 14 

tMcm Khan c ana b Pierson . 2 

Saqfan Mushtaq c Nixon b Parsons.4 

Mushtaq Ahmad c Nixon b Parsons ... 38 

Ala-ur-Rehman c Srrnlh b Bronson _30 

Moh am mad Aloam no: out . .... 0 

BtfraslbS.ljUw1.nb4) . 

Total_221 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-5, 2 53, 3-62. 4-09, 
5-129, 6-731, 7*142. B-142 9-221 
BOWLING 18-3-50-1: Parsons 2^9- 
42-2. WeJJs 5-2-180; Pierson 200-44-3. 
Bronson 21-9-39-4; Clarke 4-1-100 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First Innings 

□ L Maddy not oui . __ 8 

IJ SuIcQfle b Mohammad . 15 

Extras (bl.w 4) . 

Total (1 wki)-28 

B F Smith. A Habto. V P Ctaffto.-V J Weis. 
tPANwjn. DJ MiBns. GJParsons. ARK 
Pierson and M T Brimsnn to bal 
FALL OF WICKET' 1-28 
BOWLING: Aia-ur-Rehman 2-04-0: Mo¬ 
hammad Akron 5-MB-1; Mushtaq Ahmed 
3-1-30 

Umpires M J Kitchen and G Sharp. 


man. Millns was soon back to 
have Shahid Anwar caught 
behind before the spinners 
went to work. 

Brunson, the emerging slow 
left-armer, had Saeed Ahmed 
stumped in his first over and 
bowled Shadab Kabir in his 
third, leaving Aamir Sohail, 
who is captaining the side, to 
set about rebuilding tire in¬ 
nings with Salim Malik. 

Sohail, still having’ treat¬ 
ment for the hand injury he 
suffered in a fall during the 
first Test, did not seem to be in 
too much discomfort in bat¬ 
ting for almost an hour, but 
when he had made 30 he was 
bowled behind his legs, 
sweeping at Bvimson. 

Three of the next four wick¬ 
ets fell to Pierson, the gangling; 
off-spinner, who had Asif 
Mujtaba driving in some des¬ 
peration to cover, Moin Khan 
caught and bowled and Salim 
Malik caught at slip off a bail 
which turned and bounced. 

The Pakistanis would have 
been even more embarrassed 
but for a ninth-wicket stand of 
79 in 22 overs between Mustaq 
Ahmed and Ata-ur-Rehman. 
It ended when Mustaq. hav¬ 
ing struck five ebullient fours 
in his 3S. was given out caught 
off his glove as he tried to 
evade a short ball from Par¬ 
sons and departed vigorously, 
rubbing his left elbow. 

He soon had his chance for 
revenge, but it was the speedy 
Mohammad Akram, bidding 
to make the Test side, who 
bowled Sutcliffe with the last 
ball of the day. 



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Salim Malik produces a rare attacking stroke 


t: J:- 






Answers from page 40 
ORTEGUINA 

(a) In bull-fighting. a decorative pass made with the mnleta. An 
eponym of Domingo Ortega (born 1906), a Spanish boBfighfter 
who prqactised it The mandotina is another emb ellishm ent. 
Formerly, it was called the orteguina, allier Domingo Ortega, 
who look it from the mndeentb-centniy repertoire and 
refurbished it Manolete picked it up and further refined (ic. 
vulgarised) it" 

REMUAGE 

(b) The periodic turning or shaking of bottled wine (especially 
champagne) to move sediment towards die cork before 
disgorgement The French for "moving about". "Along the walls 
were countless bottles top downwards in racks. ‘Ready for the 
remuage. Gets the sediment down to the cork’." 
PSEUDORANDOM 

(b) Satisfying one or more statistical tests for randomness hot 
produced by a definite mathematical procedure. The recipient 
of a coded message can then be provided with a generator that 
operates exactly like die one used to add pseudorandom digits to 
the original message^" 

REINGA 

(fa) In Maori tradition, the place where departed spirits make 
their way info the next world; hence, the land of departed spirits. 
Maori for “the place of leapbag". “the natives in the north of the 
island still point out the din from which the spirits |of the deadl 
made their descent into the sea on their way back to the Island of 
Hawaii, from whence their forefathers came. This diff was 
called the Re-in-ga, ie the leaping place." _ 

SOLUTION TO WINNING CHESS MOVE 
I — Rxh3*! 2 Kxh3 Rhfr* 3 Nh4 Rsh4* 4 gxh4 g4 mate _ 

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TCCB side 
further 
weakened 
by Brown’s 
withdrawal 

By Simon Wilde 

SOUTH AFRICA A take an 
unbeaten record into the last 
and most important fixture of 
their seven-week tour against 
a TCCB XI at Chester-Ie-Street 
today, but whether the match 
is capable of living up to its 
billing must be open to serious 
doubt. Not only will Paul 
Adams, the one member of the 
youthful visiting pari)* well 
known to the English public, 
not be on view, but, for the 
second year running, the Eng¬ 
lish representative side has 
been chosen only from those 
counties without champion¬ 
ship commitments. 

While Duncan Fletcher, the 
South Africa A coach, wisely 
does not wish to write off a 
ream he has not yei seen in 
action, this is one aspect of the 
tour that has disheartened 
him. “Many of the teams we 
have met have preferred to 
rest first-choice players and 
that is disappointing,'' he said 
yesterday. 

“When England A toured 
South Africa a couple of years 
ago, the A team they played in 
their last match was regarded 
as the second-most important 
team in the country and I was 
told, as Western Province 
coach, that 1 must make do 


without several players 
because they were wanted for 
that side." 

In England, things are 
unenviably different When 
Young Australia toured last 
year, the TCCB XI contained 
players from only four coun¬ 
ties; this year the England 
selectors chose from five, al¬ 
though within the scope avail¬ 
able to them they have dearly 
proffered the hand of encour¬ 
agement to a number of 
promising performers, nota¬ 
bly Adam Hollioake. the cap¬ 
tain, Salisbury and Cowan. 

After the withdrawal yester¬ 
day of Simon Brown, Dur¬ 
ham's first Test player, who 
has a knee injury, James 
Kirtley, who is is hardly a 
household name, even in his 
native Sussex, was brought in. 

If reports of the pilch are 
anything to go by. Kirtley and 
his fellow seamers could be 
busy. Whether the match lasts 
its allotted time is, of course, a 
moot point The fixture with 
Young Australia was complet¬ 
ed in only two days on a 
wholly unsuitable surface at 
Edgbaston and there can be 
no guarantee that a new 
ground, with a square that is 
bedding down, will not pro¬ 
vide another embarrassingly 
swift encounter. 

With the three leading 
championship sides not in 
action today, the spotlight will 
fall on their three doses t 
pursuers, one of whom, York¬ 
shire. having just lost another 
cup match to Lancashire and 
Bevan, their overseas player, 
may be vulnerable at Bristol. 


nw 1 " ^— _— 

When badges 

aren’t enough 


instead of merely floating the question. Lrav^v» other 

got a don to answer 1 l After all. he doesm at 
educationalist ro wriggle off his hook- 

The Road to Paradise. Radio 4.2pm. 

Fiction based on fact, Julia Pascals drama ^London, ^then to the 
wartime odyssey from her home in Ausc hwitz. Given 

Gcman^piri island ° f «* 

its theme of a life cruelly cut short. TheR*- squeeze out the 

fail to sadden us. and Pascal xena inly toowsh ^mnstruct the 

last drop of pathos. 1 am not sure ii ^ n- racv Wiles), 

play's framework out of letters from the doomed^ ^ henher final 
The weakness of the device is most srrongly exp^cd ^ ^ gas 
communication to the outside world is though pwei- Davalk 
chamber at Auschwitz. 


RADIO 1 


FM Stereo &30aro Chris Evans 9.00 
Kevin Greening 11.30 Radio 1 
show. Bvb from the Hoe in Plymouth 
1£30pm Usa l‘Anson 00 Dava Faaice 
7.00 Evening Session 9JXJ Collins and 
Mamma's Hit Parade 10.00 Math 
RadciRe 12.00 dare Sturgess 4JM 
Cbve Warren 


RADIO 2 


FM Stereo. 6JMam Sarah Kennedy 
7 J 0 Wake Up to Wogan 9 JO Ken Bruce 
11 JO Jimmy Young 1.30pm Judi Spiers 
3.00 Ed Stewart 5JK John Dunn 7J» 
The "What If Show 7JO David Allan 
9.00 Paul Jones 10.00 DaneJ 
O'DonneJTs Musical Oan O'Donnell 
explores the roots o! Irish muse fl/6) 
10.30 The Jamesons 12.05am Sue 
McGany 3.00 Alex Lester 


RADIO 5 LIVE 


5J)0ani Morning Reports (LOO The 
Breakfast Programme £L35 The Maga¬ 
zine, with Diana MadB. hid 10.35 News 
from Europe 12-00 Midday with Mar, 
ind 12.35pm Moneycheck. with Katfe 
Derham 2X5 Ruscoe on Five, ind ai 
3 j& 5 Entertainment News 4-00 Nation¬ 
wide. mcl el 5JJS Entertainment Nows 
7.00 News Extra, ind at 7.20 Sports 
Bdletti 7.35 David Gower's Cricket 
Weekly Indudes a look at haw cricks 
end foo t Da l fere alongside each other 
9.05 SponsAmerica. with Alton Byrd 

9.35 American Graffiti 10.05 News Tafc 

10.35 Radio 5 Live at the Fringe 11.00 
Night Extra 12.05am Alter Hours — 
Earty Call 1.00-5.00 Up At Night — The 
Race tor the Whte House 


TALK RADIO 


630am Paul Ross 1030 Scott CWs- 
hein 1.00pm Anna Rasbwn 3 JJ 0 
Tommy 9oyd 5.00 Peter Deeiey 7.00 
Spot 10.00 James Whale 1 . 00 am Ian 
Colons 


WORLD SERVICE 


All rimes In BST. News on theI hour 
530am Europe Today 630 Europe 
Today 7.05 The World Today 730 
Sports International 8.10 Words ot Fatih 

8.15 Ottthe She« 830 Network UK 9.15 

Composer ot the Month 9*45 Health 
Matters 1035 Business 10.15 Sports 
international 1035 Sporta Roundup 
1130 BBC English 11.45 Otl the Sheri 
1230pm Meridan 1.15 BrteJn Today 
130 Assignment 3.05 Outtook 330 
Multi track 435 Sports Roundup 4.15 
BBC English 430 Newe in German 530 
Business 5^45 Britain Today tIO World 
Today 635 Take Five 630 News m 
German 6.45 Sports Roundup 730 
Assignment 101 C>3ook93S Wbtds ot 
Faith 930 John Peel 1035 Business 

10.15 Britain Today 1030 Mencfaan 
1130 World Today 11.45 Sport 
12.10am Take Five 12.15 Poems by 
Post 1230 Rock. Salad 130 Good 
Books 135 Britain Today 230 Outlook 
a a words ot Faith 330 Thaly-MKtute 
Drama 4.15 Sport 430 Europe Today 


CLASSIC FM 


430am Mark Griffiths 630 Mfte Read 
930 Nick Bailey 1230 Susannah 
Simons 230pm Concerto. Ravel (Plano 
Concerto tor the left hand) 330 Jamie 
Cnck 630 Newsrright 630 Sonata 
Debussy (VtoTn Sonata) 730 Travel 
Guide Sails in the Caribbean 830 
Evening Concert ibert (Suite 
ETtsabelhaine); Antoine Dauvergne 
{Concert de Simphonles in F): Beet 
(Jeux d'Entanls): Mitoaud (CeOo Concer¬ 
to No 1); Ibert (Divertissement); Ravel 
(La Valse] 10.00 Michael Mappln 
130am Salty Petgson_ 


VIRGIN RADIO 


630am Russ 'n' Jcno 030 Ffchard 
Skinner 1230 Graham Dene 430pm 
Nicky Horne 7.00 Paul Coyte 
(FBI)/Robin Banks (AM) 1030 Mark 
Forrest 230am Randal Lee Rose 


RADIO 3 



g.;;;: tABLE-.;..-';,. 



P W 

L D 

Bt 

Bt Pta 

Surrey t12). 

12 

6 

1 

5 

37 

44 192 

L«cs (7) . 

12 

6 

1 

5 

39 

41191 

Esse» (5) 

12 

6 

2 

4 

41 

39138 

Kent (IS). 

12 

6 

1 

5 

35 

39185 

Detfayshfre |14) 

12 

6 

2 

4 

38 

39185 

Yoricshre (80 

12 

6 

A 

2 

37 

38177 

MfcWte3ex (2).. 

12 

5 

5 

2 

23 

42151 

Sussex (15). 

12 

5 

5 

2 

23 

a i48 

Warwicks (1). 

11 

S 

A 

2 

2S 

35146 

Somerset (9)... 

11 

4 

A 

3 

23 

42138 

Glamorgan (16) It 

4 

4 

3 

35 

26134 

Wares (10). 

11 

3 

3 

5 

28 

40131 

Hampshire (13) 

11 

3 

5 

3 

27 

38122 

Gfcxcs (6). 

12 

2 

5 

5 

14 

42103 

Lancashire (tf).. 

11 

1 

4 

6 

32 

31 97 

Northanis (3).... 

12 

1 

6 

5 

26 

39 96 

Notts (11). 

11 

1 

5 

5 

27 

35 93 

Durham (17)... 

13 

0 

9 

4 

19 

48 79 


(Last season's positions In brackets) 


630am On Air. Indudes Dukas 
(Symphony in Q; Krnmmer 
(Oboe Quartet in Q; Zanetti 
(II Scotaro. excerpts); Vorisek 
(Variations in 6 flat Op 19); 
Beethoven (Romance in F, 

Op 50); Mlhaud (Le Camavai 
de Londres. excerpts) 

9.00 Morning Collection with 
Paul GambacdnL 
Siostatovich (Festive 
Overture). Bach (Double 
Violin Concerto in D minor. 
BWV 10431; Kuhnau (The 
Battle between David and 
Goliath. Bfb&cal Sonata No 1); 
Tippett (Piano Sonata No 1) 
1030 Musical Encounters. 

Indudes Strauss (Don Juan); 
Beethoven (Twelve Variations 
on Mozart's Bn Madchen 
oder Weibchen from Die 
Zaubsrftote) 1030 Proms 
Artist of the Week -Jutfih 
Howarth. soprano. Falla 
(Seven Popular Spanish 
Songs) 1040 Ravel 
(Habanera); Brahms 
(Symphony No 3 in F) 1135 
Poulenc (Ave verum corpus): 
Lawes (Consort Suite an A 
minor)'. Britten (On this Island) 
1230 Composer of the Week: 
Beethoven 

1.00pm Slava! John Affison 

concludes his exploration into 
the roots of Russian Opera 
2-00 fMcofai Demidenko. piano. 
Feld (Sonata No 4 in B, H17); 
Schumann (Variations on a 
Theme by Clara Wieck, 
Concert sans orchestra), 
Chopin (Nocturnes: in F 
sharp, Op 15 No 2; en C 
sharp minor. Op 27 No 1; in F 
sharp minor. Op 48 No 2) 

230 Preoccupations. Barbara 
Bortney, soprano, talks about 
her passion kw needlecrafts 


235 The BBC Orchestras. BBC 
Symphony Orchestra 
American Tour, under Andrew 
Davis. With John Li, plano. - 
Berttoz (Overture: La 
Corsarre); Bee&ioven 
Concerto No 4 in G); I 
(Symphony No 1) 

5.00 The Music Machine, with Kit 

5.15 Delius 
- Evening); Grainger 

nble on a Theme from 
■ Rosenkavafiar); Mozart 
(Sonata in C for piano duet. 
K521): Parry (Lady Radnor's 
Suite) 

730 BBC Proms 1996. Artur 
Pizano, piano, Royal Liver¬ 
pool Philharmonic, under 
Libor Pesek. Janacek (Inci¬ 
dental music: Schluck und 
Jau); Liszt (Plato Concerto 
No 1 to E tef) 735 Fanlasy 
and Fury 735 Proms Part 2. 
Bertiaz (Symphonie 
fantastiquej 

9.15 Cultural Baggage; 

Taxonomy (4/4) (r) 

935 The Art of Touching the 
Keyboard. Chrtstophe 
RausseL harpsichord, 
performs music by Couperin 
1030 BBC Proms 1996. Rosa 
Mamlon. soprano, Nash 
Ensemble, under Martyn 
Brabbins Milhaud (La crea¬ 
tion du moods): Faria 
(Psyche): Colin Matthews 
flwrenty-Three Frames lor 
Four Players); Gerhard, arr 
Bowen (Six Songs from 
L'tofantament meravellos de 
Shahrazada); Falla (El 
corregjdor y la molmera) 

1130 Composer of the Week; 

Stravinsky (r) 

12.30am Jazz Notes 
1.00 Through the Night 


RADIO 4 


535am Shipping Forecast (LW 
only) 6.00 News Briefing ind 
Weather 6.10 Fanning Today 
6JS Prayer for the Day 630 
Today Ind 7J25. 825 Sport 
7j45 Thought tor Ihe Day 
830 The Changing Forest 
(4/5) 838 Weather 
930 News 9.05 The Moral Maze, 
with Michael Buerk' 

1030 News; Minor Adjustment 
(FM), by Andy and Eric 
Merrirnan. Peter Davison aid 
Samantha Bond star in a 
comedy series about a family 
with a young daughter who 
has Down's syndrome (5/6) 
10.00 Mly Service (LW) 

10.15 On TMs Day (LW) 

1030 Woman’s Naur 
1130 From Our Own 
Correspondent 

1230 News; You end Yours, with 
Chris Choi 

1235pm SOghtiy Faced. The 
fterary quiz returns with GUI 
Pyrah in the chair and guests 
□eric Longden, Aiteen 
Armitage. Helene Wtogin and 
Nick Toezek 1235 VVaather 
1.00 The World at One, with Nick 
Ctarira 

130 The Archers (r) 135 
Shipping Forecast 
2.00 News; The Roed to 
Pandlee. See Choice 
330 News; The Afternoon Shift, 
with Brian Sibley 

4.00 News 435 Kaleidoscope at 
Edinburgh, to the first week 
of the festival. Paul Allen 
presents a Bve outside 
broadcast from the Festival 
Theatre. Includes Orlando 
starring Miranda Richardson 
the Veia^que^ axhtortlon at 
the National Gallery ol 
Scotland, and the Nederlands 
Dans Theatre 


435 Short Story: The Trouble 
wtth Wagner, by Patricia 
Hannah 

5,00 Shipping Forecasl 

535 Weather 
630 SJxO-Ctock News 
b - 30 First Impressions, with Pa 
McCarthy 

730 News735 The Archers 
730 A Degree of Uncertainty. 

See Choice (2/3) 

8.00 20/20: A View of the 

Century: Controlling. John 
Tusa examines universal 
•kernes in the 20 ttKrantury 
context Why has the 20 th 

cenduy been so vulnerable 
the appeal of total systems 

835 Twilight. Joanna Pinnock 
ejptorts toe twfilght world o 
moths (2/S) 

9.00 Does He Take Sugar? The 
to people wjt, 

!** mwS ' 1 Ed ‘ nta ' 5 

World Tonight 


Toi 


^9° The World Tortght 
1045 Book at Bedtime: 
Washington Squar 
VWkinson reads Hemv 
„ Jame&'s story (4/10) 

11 00 The.Pe ep Season: Dee 
nation Emerald. Joe 

pgasaas 

11 ■ ao John Peel ret 

^toanewserlBEol the 
^^^atonlng show abo 
12.00 ** family life to 

WMam Hope^? 
Ctonrajartfs thrffler (9/1 i 


FREOUefCY GUIDE. RADIO 1 nj 
903. RADIO 3. FM 903-92.4 RADIO *1 
720. RADIO 5 UVE. MW 693 Ed: 94 

T98 (1245335am). CLASSTC ^RVIC 

1053; MW 1197, 121SLTALK RADI^, VIR( 

end radio Ustiira eompfl^bJ^? u l 5- 1Q S3. 

Smith. Susan *+*****£ 


i 






















u w 



2^ 


THE TIMES THU&cr^., 

- ^^^lAUGUST , 5 19 % 

™ll -- ---•- 


TELEVISION 43 


AJ evermind the len gth, fight for quality 

CT/e _ af ¥--J e ^ rs a 8° were iheiSteJ 2j n . b y D &ul. whohali brokSThk r P u "d him still and prone. If.. «■; r “"il of thing and we learm nothing new and his abilitv 1 as a director to be shown as very much a 

q^^ngnemsiniheschoSS S*^ when » trapezebJInSnS he u-as dead, they ^ REVIEW . last nigh l present in a room without domi- opment. from fitness c 

fronted hi ^— •• • ' 1 - ■■ Tile truth about football hooli- Kadne the proceedings, a lesson nieces. 


up on the rails to steal the 
plaudits. Never iutfe 
by the listings J 6 ^nmg 


words- uP^y. ” ,,M u,e areaa 
r?, s ' 7“ wH never walk again. 

that^hPi? W ? lk , a P ain - He knew 

hAn . broken b 04 * ls not quite as 
hopeless as a broken neck. He has 

whrwk\ a *^ sharne on anyone 
,T l H te: ~ n ““ who 

wieve will work and those who 
work will walk.- Dikul believes 


4 telJS T^\ ^ believes that “move- 

j] Valentin Diki in ,f Was - because do their oldI J nieni means life to people. 

II 23 ™ :Y. ,s a genuine hero a °!^iobs and that muscles L -•— 

truly extr»nrHmn_. — ■ wnich are beyond repair can have 

their inhc rlnnu k. . __ ■ 


ing found him still 
Convinced he was 
rushed for a doctor. 

Dikul oontinued this regime 
for...weeks? Months? No. five 
years. He already knew some ana¬ 
tomy and learnt a lot more from 
his experience. Now in his fifties, 
he is back in the circus, tossing 
1001b balls into the air and catch¬ 
ing them on the bade of his neck. 



Peter 

Barnard 


is a genuii 

S? rao I dinaT y man. 

s&i-Sy «*hs 

sSffta 


: 'T" «j u « u repair can nav 
uiey jobs done by other muscles. 

He makes no extravagant 
claims, performs no miracles. 

--o... , 1C Iias a hrnb dispenses neither potions nor 

back but has won world cham^I P romises - After ^ own accident, 
twtships and three gold mSK n Sp T ail day da y *he 
the Paralympics for skiin° n„ f 01 2, of a B^nasium. exercising, 

wants to walk again aScSj^S H - W £ rked *™§h incredible 
4 followed him to Moscrm^I 113,11 ' T' ening dte exhaustion 

pursuit of that ambition There hi ‘S 1 thaI ^ fe11 “Iwp on the 

on-There he floor. Cleaners arriving next mom- 


IIIWlll IIJM1U Ultp 1U 

- The human organism has 

so many undiscovered resources ship are scarce worthy of a 
and possibilities". This may be so. minute's attention. Unfortunately 
but the point about Dikul is that he Inside Story: Eurocops 96 (BBC!) 
has limitless determination, in- chose to give them 50 minutes, for 

credible will. At his rehabilitation nn H>aCAn HicnpmnKIn »n mo Tko 


centre, he offered Siockfort what 
he offers others: some technique 
and some equipment to rake home. 
And masses of inspiration. 

Compared with Dikul. the 
assembled yobbery at this sum¬ 
mer's Euro % football champion- 


>.iiwv uivui jvj mu mica, iui 

no reason discemablc to me. The 
programme followed the police 
operation (cost: E2Q million) at the 
tournament and filmed what 
skirmishes there were at close 
quarters. Endless news bulletins 
before, during and after the cham¬ 
pionships had done ihe same sort 


of thing and we leamt nothing new 
last nighL 

The truth about football hooli¬ 
ganism is that there is not much of 
it about and most of what there 
was in June was the product of loo 
much booze. A documentary about 
the advanced state of police intelli¬ 
gence would have been interesting, 
but not so telegenic. 

So we were left with endless 
footage of heaving masses and pol¬ 
ice officers talking into radios and 
pointing at video screens. Pictures 
for their own sake. I longed for 
Valentin Dikul to walk in and re¬ 
duce the refevison set to chopsticks. 

His failure to do so at least 
ensured that 1 watched a proper 
documentary abour proper people. 
This was Don’t Count the Candles 
(BBC2). the first television film 
made by Lord Snowdon, in the 
1960s. in black and white. 

This film, and Snowdon's still 
photography, demonstrate his un¬ 
erring eye for picture composition 


and his ability as a director to be 
present in a room without domi¬ 
nating the proceedings, a lesson 
some modem documentary mak¬ 
ers could learn to their benefit and 
ours. Don't Count the Candles is 
about old age but the film itself has 
not aged one bit. 

S nowdon tacked on a new 
introduction. He said he was 
35 when he made the film 
but now’ has a bus pass, “it's a 
fairly episodic film and it’s also 
quite snobby, there are a lot of 

name people in it," The apologetic 
tone was unneessary. for the 
names - Noel Coward. Lady 
Asquith. Barbara Hepworfh, 
among others — were good value. 

So were more ordinary’ mortals, 
whose recurring theme was thar 
the central fear of ageing has to do 
with loneliness and the loss of 
physical independence. The battle 
against ageing, often pictured as 
some new-fangled thing, was 


shown as very much a !9oOs devel¬ 
opment. from fitness dubs to hair- 
pieces. 

There was also an exrraord inary 
sequence about fluids being inject¬ 
ed into people. The fluids had been 
taken from aborted foetuses ro- 
moved from a specially reared 
flock of sheep in Switzerland. Cow¬ 
ard said that he had some of these 
injections, but had no idea whether 
they had done him any good. 

I have no objection to people 
trying to remain youthful, except 
that the more extreme manifesta¬ 
tions of this imply an insulting 
attitude to old age. which can be 
rewarding and full of zest (I hope). 

And I suppose I had been pre¬ 
judiced against the trivial, whether 
in the form of vanity or loutery. by 
the insistent vision of Valentin 
Dikul. sweating on the hard 
wooden floor of a Russian gym. 
Last night, he alone seemed to 
embody 1 the value of life, rather 
than its length. 


SSSSIISIEPPot 


6 -OOiun Business Breakfast (22080) 7 00 
900 BnZkta?* (Ceefax > (83979) 


Id 


9.20 Defia Smith's Summer Collection 
3k (Ceefax) (s) (7S97028) 

9.50 Gourmet Ireland (5931028) 

10^0 FILM: Lucky Jim (tVw, 1957) Classic 
Brrtfsh comedy, based on the novel by 
Kingsley Amis, about a junior history 
lecturer at a provincial university. Directed 
by John Boulting (10506844) 

12.00 News and weather (1623844) 

1225pm Alphabet Game (4893047) 
12J5 Neighbours (Ceefax) (s) (6624950) 

1 .00 One O’Ctock News and weather (63738) 
1 JO Regional News (42915399) 

1.40 Small Talk, (r) (7977738) 

2.15 Lovefoy (218940) 

3.05 Unspeakable Verse (7737641) 3JO 
The Rockford Flies (9225738) 420 
Knots Landing (7156955) 

5-35 Neighbours (r) (Ceefax) (s) ( 669844 ) 
6J0 Six O’Ciock News (Ceelax)(202) 

6.30 Regional News magazines (554) 

7-00 Holidays Out Kfrsty Young and Ben Hall 
present more ideas for days out and 
weekends across the country. (Ceefax) 
(S) (5757) 

7 JO EastEnders. There's a special promotion 
at Ihe Cobra Club, while Nigel and San jay 
run a disco for the kids. Cindy and David 
jk find time for a chat about the future. 

■ (Ceefax) (s) (738) 

BJ>0 Back to the Wld. Patrick Robinson goes 
behind the scenes at the RSPCA's wfldlife 
hospital in Somerset {4405} 

8J0 Auntie’s Sporting Bloomers. Terry 
Wogan introduces another selection of 
the sporting action that should never 
have happened (Ceefax) (s) (3912) 

9.00 Nine O’Ctock News (Ceefax) regional 
news and weather (7850) 

9J0 Atfetico Particle. The lives and loves of 
an amateur football team on and off the 
field. Jack starts this episode with a new 
girlfriend and ends up In a gay dito with a 
new boyfriend (Ceetax) (s) (61283) 
10.00f553SgBl Defence of the Realm: 
E ffrara Trident Countdown. For the 
first time, cameras are atowed on board 
the top-secret Trident nuclear submarine 
(Ceefax) (s) (771573) 

10.55 ■flfJM You Decide. Jeremy Paxman 
invites a studio audience to 
debate a topical issue, presiding over the 
argument and counter-argument on the 
issue of the week. A final live phone-in 
reveals the verdict (297196) 

11.45 FILM: Appointment In Honduras 
(1953) with Glenn Ford. Ann Sheridan 
and Zachary Scott. En route with money 
to help the fight against the rebels in 
Honduras. Jim Corbett's ship is diverted, 
if forcinq him to undertake a dangerous 
trek through the jungle. Directed by 
Jacques Tourneur (428554) 

1.00am The Road to the White House 1996: 
The Republican Party Convention. 
Live coverage of the proceedings of the 
first in this year's American election 
conventions (7943993) 

4 JO Weather (64573806) 


VMeoPlus+ and the Vktoo PtusCodas 
The numbers no* to each TV prograrimo 
feting are Video PtusCode numbers, which 


6.00am Open University: A Natural Model 
(3742486) 6J5 Brain and Behaviour 
(3754221) 6J0 Work and Energy 
(2639979) 7.15 See Hear Breakfast 
News (Ceefax. and signing) (6070202) 

7 JO The Brolfys (3218347) 7.45 Lassie 
(1802863) 8.10 Smurfs* Adventures 
(5413486) 8J5 Cartoon Critters 

(3486509) 9.05 Splderman (ri (s) 
(2960370) 9.25 The Village by the Sea 
(7503689) 9JO Puppydog Tales 

(3194554) 10.00 Playdays (s) (7131134) 
10.25 Man In a Suitcase (r) (2803554) 11.15 
The Phil Silvers Show (r) (8534370) 
11.40 The Addams Family (r) (5394775) 
12.05pm Great Crimes and Trials of 
the 20th Century (4891689) 12J5 It’s a 
Living (6622592) 1.00 The Broitys 
(45940689) 1.15 A-Z of Food 

(24962486) 1J5 Menus and Music 

(45929196) 

1.40The Oprah Winfrey Show (8090047) 
2J0 Crawshaw Paints Oils (87370592) 
2JO Don’t Be an Anorak! (1562134) 
3.00 News (1702202) 3.05 The Natural 
World (1873825) 3J5 News (3387573) 

4 JO Cartoon (5536660) 4.05 Little Mouse 

on the Prairie (3396221) 4J0 

Bouncing Back (s) (979) 5.00 

Newsround (9934757) 5.10 Byfcer 
Grove (r) (Ceefax) (4349467) 

5J5 FILM: South of St Louis (1949). Three 
friends see their ranch destroyed at the 
stall of the American Civil War. Directed 
by Ray Enright (4805486) 

7 JO Seven Ages of Man. Anthony Qare talks 
to bad Deedes (Ceefax) (s) (3399) 

7 JO Designer Dreams (s) (680) 


__ ___— y 00 

Hfchto record. Vkteoplus+ (* ),ftuecod* CT 
md Video Programmer are trademance or 
Gemstar Development Ltd. 



CHOICE 


Kirsty Young in Exmouth (8.00pm) 

BJOThe Street Kirsty Young and her team 
visit Victoria Road in Exmouth, Devon 
(Ceefax) (s) (2047) 

8 JO One Foot on the Continent 

iBSiM Kirsty Wark leads the first lor ay 
abroad for the team (Ceefax) (s) (1554) 

9.00 The Travel Show. From Chicago, which 
is challenging New York as America's 
first-choice city break. (Ceefax) (s) (5592) 

9 JO Dark Secret Too Much, Too Young. 

The condition of precocious puberty, 
which atleds 550 young people each 
year (2/6) (69825) 

10.00 Hancock: The Bowmans. Hancock 
plays CHd Joshua Merryweather tn a radio 
senes. His behaviour leads to him being 
written out of the script (Ceefax) (s) 
(52047) Followed by Video Nation Shorts 
lOJONewsntght (Ceefax) (733573) 

11.15 Oldie TV (325738) Followed by 
Weatherview 

12.00 Grace under Fire (Ceefax) (s) (45806) 
12JOamOpen University: The Rinuccinf 
Chapel, Florence (18210) 1.00 Soap 
and Water (62158) 1JO Greenberg on 
Jackson Pollock (40644) 2.00 Summer 
Nights: Music Maestro Essentials 
( 38245 ) 4J» Mexico Vivo, Diet Temas, 
Spanish Gfabo, Bon Mat (97429) 


Black Bag: Sukide Warriors 

Chunne/ 4.8.00pm 

Question: What makes the Black Tigers of 
Sri Lanka different from other rebels? 
Answer They are willing to die if they can 
lake the ■'enemy" with them. This was true of 
Japan's kamikaze pilots but unlike them the 
Black Tigers (the elite suicide bombers 
within the Tamil army) do nor expect a 
reward in Heaven. The war between the 
majority Sinhalese Government and the 
Tamil separatists has been raging since the 
late 1970s and so far has killed more than 
40,000 — including countless civilians. 
Sabiha Sumar’s unique film concentrates on 
a force within the Tamils which may be their 
secret strength: the women, fighting for 
equality with their men. are often better at 
precision shooting and bombing. And they 
arc just as fanatical — eager and proud to be 
accepted as Black Tigers. Says one: "Even if 
we fall in love we will not deviate from our 
aim." Chilling. 

One Fool on die Continent 

BBC2. SJOpm 

"Southern Tuscany... there is something 
improbable about its beauty." intones 
Andrew Graham-Dixon as he lakes One 
Foot in the Past on its first foreign 
assignment As you'd expect from this 
intrepid team, there is nothing touristy or 
obvious in their Italian discoveries. PienzaTa 
perfect Renaissance town" created by Pope 
Pius II. has a Gothic cathedral inspired by 
our very own York — "but without stained- 
o, ass windows. This Pbpe wanted sun." says 
ixon. Kirsty Wark’s Venzone "has not been 
in the guidebooks since 1976 when two 
earthquakes obliterated most of it". But the 
wnsfolk have sifted through the rubble to 
reconstruct their gem in the Dolomites. And 
if you thought you knew Palermo — well, 
think again when you follow Dan 
Cruickshank into the Palazzo Cinese. 

Secret History: 

Harold Wilson —The Final Days 
Channel 4,9.00pm 

By the time he had won his fourth election in 
1974. was the Prime Minister turning 
paranoid? Ten years on from his first, 
buoyant success. Wilson had begun to drink 
heavily and was obsessed by rumours that 
renegade MI5 officers were seeking to 
undermine his Government. Certainly there 
were accelerating smears against the Labour 
Party, not least the allegation of links 
between Wilson and the KGB. But was 
Wilson right to be so suspicious — or was he 
becoming mentally unstable, "a tragic 
figure." to quote correspondent Chapman 
Pmdier. when Wilson resigned, a broken 
man. in 1976? Retired officers from the CIA. 
KGB and MI5. together with some of 
Wilson's closest circle, suggest not only that 
there were indeed plots aimed at bringing 
the man to his knees but that they are partly 
vindicated by an unofficial inquiry ordered 
by Wilson's successor, James Callaghan. 

Defence of the Realm: Trident Countdown 

BBCI. iOpm 

This unprecedented inside look at the MoD 
is shaping into an impressive series. It is 
hard to fault the immense sense of occasion, 
the patriotism and tension among the 134- 
strong crew of the submarine HMS 
Notorious as they prepare for the big day: 
the lesr firing of one of their 16 (unarmed) 
Trident missiles. As each warhead is five 
times more powerful than the Hiroshima 
bomb there are obvious questions to be 
asked and reporter Peter Taylor doesn't 
fudge them. But Commander Jonty Pbwis 
“revels in the responsibility... there is no 
point having nuclear weapons if you are not 
prepared to fire them". Elizabeth Cowley 




A.'> 1 


6.00am GMTV (4076844) 

9-25 Halfway across fha Galaxy and Turn 
Loft (75901151 

9 JO Hope and Gloria (5926196) 

10JO ITN News (5242554) 

10.25 Regional News (5241825) 

10 JO Lady Boss. The first of a two-part serial 
based on the novel by Jackie Collins (r) 
140682196) 

12J0pm Regional News (1629028) 

12J0ITN Lunchtime News (Teletext) 
(6627047) 

12 J5 Shortiand Street (6602738) 1J5 

Coronation Street (6469738) 2.00 
Home and Away (87363202) 

225 FILM: A Town Tom Apart (1992). The 
conclusion of yesterday's film. Directed 
by Daniel Petrie (9612270) 

3J20ITN News (1719592) 

3JS Regional News (1718863) 

3.30 The Riddlere (3110919) 3.40 Wizadora 
(3925844) 3JO Molly’s Gang (9510955) 
4.05 Animanlacs. Superior animation 
(2816680) 420 Blazing Dragons 

(2031825) 4.45 The Scoop (1266399) 
5.10 A Country Practice (5663863) 

5.40 ITN Early Evening News (Teletext) 
(185467) 

6.00 Home and Away (r) (Teletext) (685689) 
625 Regional News (823592) 

7.00 Emmerdale. Faye i s resc ued by the 
Dingles (Teletext) (s) (7775) 

7 JO The Big Story. In foe wake of the 

Dunblane tragedy, foe results of a 
countrywide investigation are revealed, 
which shows thar there are many mentally 
ill and unstable people licensed to carry 
guns in Britain (134) 

8.00 The BiH: Minding. A doting parent 
arouses Loxton's and Keane's 
suspicions (9573) 

8 JO The Freddie Starr Show. Comedy does 

not come any broader (Teletext) (8080) 


'.-I--! 


As HTV WEST except 
625pm-7.00 Wales Tonight (8235921 
7J0-8.00 On the Chapel Trail H34) 

10.40 The Sherman Plays (7556-Ui 

11.10-11 AO The Big Story io157761 


WESTCOUNTRY 


As HTV West except: 

1020am Film: Between the Darkness and 
the Dawn (40682196) 

1225pm Emmerdale (6602738) 

125-125 The Big Day (83213554) 

125 Home and Away (58945757) 

225 Sixth Sense (87373689) 

225-320 A Country Practice (1789979) 

5.10-5.40 Home and Away (5663863) 
6.00-7.00 Westeountry Live (84134) 

10.45 On the Edge (819776) 

11.15 Roadnimer (816689) 

11.45 Prisoner Cell Block H (599486) 
12.35am Phoenix (4221413) 





Mck Berry as PC Rowan (9.00pm) 

9.00 HeartBeat Endangered Species. A hit 

and run incident leads Nick to discover a 
darker side ol country life (r) (s) (7689) 
10.00 ITN News at Ten (Teletext) (49573) 

10.30 Regional News (958405) 

10.40 Tim's Legacy. A locus on Tim Goggs. 
who died a hero trying to save a mine- 
clearing team trapped in a burning tank rn 
Afghanistan (933486) 

1120 Bodies of Evidence (r) (569383) 
12.35am Cue the Music: The Commitments 
(si (4221413) 

125 Not Fade Away (S) (B437719) 

225 Flux (8658413) 

325 Late and Loud (r) (9516992) 

420The Time...the Place: Strippers (r) 
(70177) 

5.00 Grass Roots (42852) 

5.30 ITN Morning News (33061) 


As HTV West except 

1020 Him: Between the Darkness and the 
Down (40682196) 

1225pm Home and Away (6602738) 

125 Just a Minufia (83213554) 

125 A Country Practice (89943196) 

220 Sixth Sense (87374318) 

220-320 High Road (5262318) 

5.10-5.40 Shortiand Street (5663863) 

625 Central News and Weather (633080) 
1020 London Bridge (755844) 

11.10-11.40 Revelations (315776) 

1220am Carnal Knowledge (4220784) 

1.40 Not Fade Away (8429790) 

2.40 Flux (8657784) 

3.40 The Crime Hour (51125311 




MERIDIAN 


As HTV West except 920-1020 Sandokan 
(5926196) 10JO Worzel Gummldge (57S92) 
11.00 Dogtaraan and the Three 
Muskehounds (5271318) 1125 Cross 

Combat (5274405) 1125 Dungeons and 
Dragons (8649842) 1225pm Emmerdale 
(6602738) 125 Home and Away (83213554) 
125 Shortiand Street (89943196) 220 Sixth 
Sense (87374318) 220-320 Doing It Up 
(5262318) 5.10 Home and Away (5663863) 
6.00 Meridian Tonight (370) 620-7.00 Grass 
Roots (950) 10.40 Film: Prince of Darkness 
(23287115) 1225am Phoenix (4221413) 

h : .y^^Cv..- • \ r '„. 

Starts: 625 Star Street (2603554) 720 The 
Big Breakfast (86689) 920 CaGfomb 
Dreams (7502950) 925 The Secret World of 
Alex Mack (7589009) 925 Hang in with Mr 
Cooper (6711202) 1020 Earthworm Jim 
(25624671 1045 BUI and Ted’s Excellent 
Adventures (5561689) 11.10 Biker Mice from 
Mars (8546115) 11JO Insektors (3699347) 
1120 Dermis (8775399) 12.05pm Mork and 
Mindy (6846912) 1220 Love and Marriage 
(74757) 1.00 Slot Meithrin (6471573) 1J5 
Him: The Man Who Loved Redheads 
(33786221) 3.15 Rlekf Lake (4177486) 4.00 
Backdate (863) 4JO The Middle Ages (937) 
5.00 5 Pump: Superted (1931) 520 
Countdown (399) 620 Newyddion (375671) 

6.15 Heno (549028) 7.00 Pobol Y Cwn 
(943399) 725 Bancar (101202) 8.00 Y Ras 
Bysgota (7115) 8J0 Newyddion (9950) 9.00 
Encounters: The Beast of Bardia (8931) 
10.00 Film: Benny raid Joon (318399) 1125 
Justice for Lynn (891486) 1.00am War Cries: 
Baseball in Irish History (84326) 


625am Star Street <r) (2603554) 

7.00 The Big Breakfast (866891 
9.00 California Dreams (r) (7502950) 

925 The Secret World of Alex Mack (ri (si 

(7589009) 

925 Hangin’ with Mr Cooper (r) (Teletext) (s) 
(6711202) 

1020 Earthworm Jim (r) (si (2552467) 

10.45 Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventures (r) 

(s) (5561689) 

11.10 Biker Mice from Mars (r) (8537467) 
1125 Insektors (r) (5222496) 1120 
Dennis (r) (8775399) 12.05pm Mork 
and Mindy ir) (6846912) 

1220 Travels a La Carte (1/8) Sicily (r) (s) 
(74757) 

120 Sesame Street (r) (s) (62912) 

2.00 Seers and Clowns (47154047) 

2.15 FILM: Footsteps in the Dark (1941) 
Errol Flynn in a comedy-ttiriHer as an 
investment banker who wants to be a 
enme writer Directed by Lloyd Bacon 
(Teletext) (692486) 

4.00 Backdate (s) (863) 

4 JO Countdown (s) (937) 

5.00 Ricki Lake(s) (8739863) 

5.45 Snapshots. Tony Benn (r) (459554J 
6.00 Eerie, Indiana: The Lost Hour (r) 
(Teletext) (s) (912) 

6 JO Boy Meets World: Last Temptation of 
Cory (Teletexl) (s) (826863) 

625 Fresh Pop (401738) 

720 Channel 4 News (Teletext) (225221) 
720 The Slot (283689) 

8.00 Lrtjsferp-j Black Bag: Suicide 

Warriors. The corps of Tamil 
Tigers are wining to die tor their cause in 
Sri Lanka Are they freedom fighters or. as 
the Government insists, drugged 
fanatics? (Teletextj (7115) 

8.30 Home to Roost (Teletext) (9950) 



9.00 


An unhappy Harold Wilson (9.00pm) 

Secret History: Harold 
Wilson — the Final Days. 
The programme Icoks at all the rumours 
surrounding an increasingly paranoid 
Pnme Minister (Teletext) (s) (8931) 

10.00 FILM: Water (1985). FeebJe Ealing 
comedy wflh a high-calibre cast including 
Michael Caine. Billy Connolly. Leonard 
Rossiter, Maureen Lipman and Valerie 
Pemne. who do whal they can with a 
mediocre script. Directed by Dick 
Clement (Teletext) (s) (318399) 

1125 Adult Rlcld: I Share My Husband with 
My Sister (Teletext) (s) (853196) 
12.40am Kids in the Had tr) (Teletext) (s) 
(8058974) 

1.10 Beavrs and Bullhead (r) (s) (4964142) 
120 Let the Blood Run Free (r) (s) (5035054) 
2-10 FILM: I’ve Heard the Mermaids 
Singing (1987) (9243697). Ends at 
3,40am 










m 




• For more comprehensive 
listin gs of satellite and cable 
ffrann f k see die Vision sup¬ 
plement, published Saturday 

SKY ONE _ 

7j00mti Unttin iB5T57) 9M Pr ess Votf 
Luck (4938825) ft2D Love Conneawi 
(1752134) MS Oprah VWWiey PJM9N 
1040 Jeopa**’ (80858241 IMOJWV 
Jessy Raphael (8550047) 1220 Gerddo 
(482701 IJJOpm Code 3 
Desasring Women (261341 2M 
and Other wonders (83405) MO Ccut TV 
(9592) 320 Oprah Winfrey (5782950) 415 
Lfcrian 1190(573) 5J» 

(4824i GJOO Bewsly Hits 

7.00 Speflbound (15731 TJOM’/re'H 

1439 * 8.00 Through the Keytato petth 

EL3Q The WoriO atW 

The Comrnish (49009) 10.00 

Leap (42196) 11-00 

1240 late Show with 

(6201577) 1 ZMmt The Jose^me »»» 

Stay (6385264) 120 

and Brian (894431 240 Kit Mw (B503852) 

SKY NEWS ___ 

News on Ihe hour _ rwwid 

6 .oaam Sunrse 

5000(21689) lOJOABCMghftneP^) 

1 JJpoCBS 

(4776) 320 Bvywid 20™ 

Tonight ««h Simon “ ri ^ rt ^ 5 2 a I x t a 
Spombne (5641? 630 

430 G8S Nrws (51 177) 630 ABC wonu 

tea (75061) 

SKY MOVIES _ 

62B«i PWflou»Joanyy Pggj 
600 How to Steal tto 
(34757) 1000 l™ TWPP 
«OB# (1W4) (38979) 1230CdeW»£ 
fruity (1867) «7080) 
flBMl 166776) «J»>6o*»9 ***?*‘vJJJ 
(5776) too W Thranrt I 
Non (1994) (18»9] 730 l^Top T 
13467) 800 Thv Jvnrfe Book 

TZOO M and Bow 

Tenon (1993) (10856501) 

.• v »• ■■ 1 


SKY MOVIES GOLD 

12.00 PnWre o Big Acfvorturo (19^ 
(11950) aoopm TnstwwiYnr nn 
(1955) 149318) 4 JOO CngM tnthe Dran 
(19411 (62660) 530 Am® (1 972) 
Sjotiia, ioOAi tf» RlgM (1963) 

Gorift-httW MW « 
(63064B25) 12-15amlWSraenVrarHri' 
11965) (188784) ZM Ba by, ffa 
(19K) (729177) i4S-5.10 Cwght In »• 
Draft (1041) (5758608) 

THE MOVIE CHANNEL 

5jooam £52) SSSLiS 

BKSESttSJgSg 

ssrars^g 
gss, ® 

rtnn (56399) 1030 In the M** 0 !®* 

gff. S (33066080) 12-15 Slnkra 

Qdd» (1964) (885061) 

IMF niSNEY CHANNEL - 

Sky Horin GoW t«X*s over trom lop 03 

Sff-SSS^STS^ 

Lamb Chops 

Belie (76585573) 1^^™ Terran 
(838331S6) ^ 

Teen Angel ( 3tJ79i9e) 

f 0819186 ^ SSSl 330 CNP « 

D3te 4i40 Dewing 

DaW#1Q Gaigoytei 

Frew* 

(33270979) MB J- Vm*wemort 
53400047) WO ^ ^ 

?Si3 a 

gsa^ssti—" 


EUROSPORT 


7JJ0am Mountain take (77270) 830 Eurotun 
(58370) 9 00 AjMelxs (17009) 1130 Live 
Mouniai*** (19641) 130pm 

Motmcydmg Magaane (47738) 130 

Eirolun (86028) 230 Live &it (9S2021430 
Amtetics (1047) 830 Fomula 1 (5047) 830 
Live Terra [86047) 830 Truck Racing 
(7467) 930 Sumo 196S31) 1030 AlNeUrc 
(93738) 11.00 Saing (70405) 1130 

Motorcvctmg Magazine P9B44) 1X30- 
1230am Fcrrruja I (14974) 


— SKY SPORTS 


730HTI Spori& Centre (53309) 730 Wrcs- 
Hku — Supersura (10202) 830 Racing 
tetfs (6320?) 630 ACTDOC3 (54SS41 930 
Women's Goll- McDonalds Champcnsrtp 
(10399) 1030 U15 Werratonal Cnc*£i 
Lombard World Challenge Senu-lnai On 
(7058950) 630pm Spons Centre (4931) 
730 Inside the PGA Tour (7844) 730 Tighl 
Lines (71825) 630 Fonrew Three Rac*ig 
(59*631655 Sports Centre (143318) 030 
pools n AH (52973) 1030 Spats Centre 
(75047) 1030 ASP Surlrg (13641) 1130 
U15 international CnckH 1 Lombard World 
Cnsilenge Semt-hnal On (17863) 1230am 
Tiohr Lnes (34093) 130 Berts 'n' All 
p31 77) 23M3D Sports Centre (73326) 

SKY SPORTS 2 

730pm The Wiring PosL Norton Abbot 
*!d Yarmouth (34703101 830 Mountain 
(2004370) 930 GoH USA The Spnm 
Internationa) (9522047) 1130 Lmes, 
(81354051 1230-130am Formula Three 
Racing (1684803) 

THE CHRISTIAN CHANNEL 

4£0ara Thought (or the Day 4.05 Wrtifrp 
4.15 l>jdz TV 430 Moms CenAa Yrclofy 
S3) Voice rt \floray 530 '>nylar Musk 
TV 5.4S Ths Is You Day 8.15 Cnangrg 
Your World 645-730 Good Marrurg 
Eur«X' 

SKY soap _ 

7.00am Guiding Ltfs Ot52711i 735 As 
the World Turns (9210979) 830 Peyion 
Place 15260682) 930 Days rt Ou Lives 
(5433370110.10-11.00 Anctha World 



TCC 


Marilyn Monroe m The Seven Year Itch (Movies Gold, 2.00pm) 


Getaway (2536950) 130 On Top rt the 
Work) (9823234) 230 Gtoel Towns rt the 
Old WfcU (5586Z02) 330 GWMLrotier 
12024134) 330 Around the Worid m30 
M nutes (8979301) 33M30 HrtOay Shop 
(75714047) 

THE HISTORY CHANNEL 

430pm Memnm?s rt 1884 (5284979) 530 
VJ Day (20154B61 630-7.00 Bogaphy 
(35288421 

THE SCI-FI CHANNEL 

F<ms. learues and classic so-L seres 
every day from Bam- 2 am on carte rtid 
1«m-4am. plus 7 pnv 10 pm Monday wyed- 
nasday. on setefce 

130am The So Mflfan Ddlar Man 
I9643M-4) 230 FILM: Conquest of Space 
(26446441330-430 BolWMh (30341 77} 

TLC _ 


SKY TRAVEL 


1130am Boomerang (5260399) 1130 
Gran) Sprats Vacaturs (526l028i 1230 
UK Today I243i660) 1230pm Ptene 
Franey's Coo*ug in France (8473793) 1.00 


9.00am The Joy ot Pamrg 17903979) 9J50 
The- G^rcen Show (9913196) 10.00 Turn's 
Country (6638028) 1030 Home Aqan *mh 
Boo Vila (7992863) 1130 Tie Parned 
House i5vOJ7S7| 1130 Room lor Impicw- 
meni ISn5486i 1200 .luia CM (7983115) 
1230pm The Frugal Goormrt 19912912) 
130 Simply DeSooie Feh (Z3840BO) 130 


TNs r«d House (9911283) 230 This Old 
House (77409IB) 230 Garden Oub 
(7412450) 330 Re> Hum's Ftshng Adven¬ 
tures (2590216) 330-430 Tha (Md House 
with Sieve and Norm (2262757) 

UK GOLD _ 

730am Happy Ever Alter (2374467) 730 
NegfrOoura (2386202) 8.00 Angels 

[798B4SE} 830The Odd Coiflle (7981757) 
9.00 The B4I (79720091 930 The Srdnrns 
(9910554) 1030 Bergaac [2382486) 1130 
Brtfeeye (5506115) 1130 TeUystach 
(5607B44) 1230 Sale ol the Cemrav 
[7985573) 1230pm Nemours (9914370) 

I. 00 T1 Death Us Do Parr (9003486) 135 

Ht-Ofrrt (SB56467) 2.15 Ever Decrsasihg 
Circles (9626573) 235 BuCafies 

(9154757) 330 The B8 (4547125) 430 One 
by Ore (87503931) 535 Teityslack 
(85246738) 535 Bufceve (74186601 8.05 
You Rang. M Lad 7 (22607571735 The Two 
Romes (5719221) 8.00 The Other One 
[9340793) 830 Up Ihe EJefriani and Round 
Iho Castle (63904781 930 Miss Mapte 
Nemesis (1349950) 1030 The Bit 
(2923931) 1035 Cameo Canon 1^756000) 

II. 15 TT«? Soeenay (7329134) 12.15am 
RLU: Tha MgM We Dropped a danger 
(3829177) 135-330 ShnpfWig (40494973) 


630am Try TCC (55370) 730 Tiny and 
Crew (2531825) 7.15 Rosie and Jfcn 
113674051 730 Greedvsaums and ihe 
Gang (2503573) 7.40 Bertha (3454318) 
7.50 Teddy Trucks (3443207) 830 Baney 
are Fnends 167329) 830 Onobat.es 
(90370) 9.00 Art Anacfc (14950) 930 ByVs; 
Grove (28641) 10.00 Healbrea). H«h 
(374861 11.00 Martson (20806) 1130 
Hang Time (70365) 12-00 Degress Jurat* 
High (17806) 1230pm PugwaM (39757) 
130 CaMomta Dreams (28738) 130 
Metdown Cybernet (38028) 2.00 Ready w 
Not (3711) 230 MadBon (6318) 330 
Heartbreak High (70301) 430 Callomta 
Dreams (22701 430830 ByKer Grove 
16554) 

NICKELODEON _ 

630am Bananas m Pyjamas (5406680) 
6.15 Mr Men (5401115) 830 Babai (12554) 
730 uatesi Pet Shop (446411 730 Tralles 
(637761830 Eft* Mice Horn Mm (62573) 
830 MgMy Max (61844) 930 Rugrals 
(35060) 1030 Real Monsters (38134) 1030 
Douq (41080) 1130 Hocto (51370) 1130 
Pete' and Pete (69399) 1430 Ale. Mat*. 
(85660) 1230pm Ren and SOnpy (93931) 
1.00 Santo Bugro (43912) 130 Capital 
Otters (92202) 230 Ferrets (4370) 230 
Mighty Mac (5172) 330 Bkra Mice from 
Mas (34051 330 Real Monsters (9009) 
430 Trtas from the Crypftrepet (18441 
430 Rugrate (7028) 530 Seta Sister 
(4757) 630 Alex Mack (1221) 830-730Are 
You Atrard ol Bte Dark? (2573) . 

DISCOVERY _ 

430prt> islands rt Ihe Psaftc Fiji (5595009) 
530 Time Traveters (7540711) 530 
Jraasstes (3612598) 830 Beyond 2000 
(9920931) 7.00 WUd Things: Rnrer Rad 

(3140955) 730 Mystanes, Magic and 

M redes (69673651 8.00 The Spectefets 
(1334028) 830 View from ihe Cage — 
Animal Crackers (1347592) 1030 Top 

Maiques: Lotus (7964844) 1030 Top 

Marques Rote Royce (7993592) 1130- 
1230 duslEe FOes (2381757) 

BRAVO _ 

1230 Roan Hood (7970641) 1230pm 
USHam Te» (9916738) 130 The Buccaneers 
(23911341 130 The Aduanures ol So 
Lancrtrt 19915009) 230 Department S 
(6626283) 330 The Saint (5503028) 430 
HLM: The Gods Must Be Crazy 
(4390298) 830 UFO (9924757) 730 


Randall and Hopkri- (Deceased) (1345134) 
830 Land ol ihe Giants H321554) 930 
T«m Peaks U34131B) 1030-1230 FILM: 
Hers Angels on Wheats (5502399) 

PARAMOUNT _ 

7.00pm Family Tk» (5486) 730 Enicnan- 
mar* (8757) 830 Wings 14134) B30 
Laveme and Shsiev (3641) 930 Soap 
(71134) 930 Ta» (804E7) 1030 Enienare 
men! (736861 1030 Dr hac (590CS) 11.00 
Home Court (83979) 1130 London under¬ 
ground (32318) 1200 Canal Knowledge 
(24448) 130am Soap 168500 130 Tan 
(23806) 230 Enledarnmenl (58061) 230 
Wings (71988) XOODrKflE (96264) 330- 
4.00 Home Court 168448) 

UK LIVING _ 

8303m K)ttoy (7197689) 730 Esther 
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7.00 Boy Bands Stepped to ire WacJ 
(3115) 730 Poptami I4447BJ 9.00 an¬ 
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Head 113221) 1130 Headbangere' Ball 
1470281 1.00am Videos (3354239) 5.00 
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VH-1 _ 

730am Power BreaMasi (2535221) 930 
Gale VH-1 (479549611200 Heart and Sort 
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11823216) 200 Ten rt Ihe Besi 15588660) 
330 ino the Misc (B35168S0 630 Happy 
Hora (1728860) 7.00 VH-1 ta You 
(6498793) 830 Thursday Review [1093671) 
930 Ten ol the Besl (9015347) 1030 The 
'60s Vinyl Yeas {7848234) 1130 Music 
Fmsl (2522757) 1200 VH-1 to 1 (9255500) 
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CMT EUROPE _ 

Courtly music Irom 6am fip 7pm on 

sateifito, 24 hours on cable 

ZEE TV _ 

7.00am Jtegran (378569791730 Lite Styte 
East (270154671830 PBU (57785038) 930 
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Chup (56413824) 730 Gataxzcte 

(40304196) 830 News (-10118432) 830 
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WATER SKIING 38 

Britons take a 
giant leap for 
disabled sport 


SPORT 


THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 


RACING# 

Ireland’s champion 
trainer still 
expanding his horizons 



French pair head for Highbury 

Arsenal sign 
two but wait 
for Wenger 

By Rob Hughes, football correspondent 


CURIOUSER and curiouser 
grows tiie turmoil around 
Arsenal. Yesterday, the dub 
signed two French Legion¬ 
naires, midfield players, yet 
no one around Highbury was 
able to confirm that the sup¬ 
posed general, the coach 
Arsene Wenger, would indeed 
be coming to manage the 
team, the dub, and the dire 
rebuilding process. 

Indeed, having dismissed 
Bruce Rioch on Monday, 
Arsenal now say that they will 
not have his replacement in¬ 
stalled before the FA Carling 
Premiership kick-off against 
West Ham United on Satur¬ 
day. Instead, they introduced 
Remi Garde. 30. from Stras¬ 
bourg. who was free to dedde 
his future under the Bosnian 
ruling, having reached the end 
of his contract Potentially 
more exriring is Patrick Vieira, 
also French and. at 20. at least 
with his best decade ahead of 
him. 

However, Vieira is stiU a 
curious acquisition. He sur¬ 
prised all erf France when, at 
19, he was plucked out of 
Cannes to sign a 44-year 
contract with the all-powerful 
AC Milan. A change of man¬ 
ager in Milan, barely a game 
in a year for Vieira, and 
suddenly eight billion lira (just 
under £3.5 million) secures for 
Arsenal his potential right on 
the deadline for the dub to 
sign him and Garde to meet 
Uefa requirements for Euro¬ 
pean competition this season. 

Vieira had played 50 times ’ 
for Cannes, and certainly has 


much talked-about potential. 
He is big, black, and would 
have played for France at the 
Olympics this summer but for 
injury. He was bom in Sene¬ 
gal in June 1976. He is almost 
6 ft 3in. travels on a French 
passport, and Milan signed 
him in good faith as “the new 
Marcel Desailly". Last Nov¬ 
ember they gave him a con¬ 
tract worth more than £3 
million to Last until the end of 
the century. They paid the 
same transfer fee that Arsenal 
have agreed, but Vieira. 




among such exalted company 
in Milan, was given only two 
league games and one Copa 
Italia tie. 

So who, at Highbury, could 
have known that he may be a 
fine capture, given that the one 
headline he drew during .a 
season in Italy was as a 
passenger in a car driven by 
George Weah. the world play¬ 
er of the year, which rolled 
and almost killed the pair of 
them on a weekend off? 

Of course, it has to be 



B 

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BRITISH MIDLAND 



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13 Trifling (6) 

IS Entrust perpetrate ( 6 ) 

IS Patron saint of music (7) 

20 Sprint panache (4) 

23 Retirement income 13.3.7) 

24 Meat-substitute bean (4) 

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DOWN 
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Timber-dressing tool (4) 
Policeman (sfa/ig) (5) 
Nut-adjusting mol (7) 
Female giant (6) 

Concise witticism (7) 

Little picture, sketch ( 8 ) 

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16 Service book; number like 
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19 Company emblem (4) 

21 Be perfunctory (5) 

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irritatedly (4) 


PRIZES: _ 

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Post your entry to Tunes Two Crossword, PO Box 6886, 
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and solution will appear on Wednesday. 


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SOLUTION TO NO 860 

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Wenger. The mark of this 
educated man is that, through 
his ooaching at Monaco, he 
could spot the talents in play¬ 
ers such as Weah — indeed in 
Glenn Hoddle — and nurture 
those talents where others 
failed to do so. 

So what holds back the 
announcement that the 
Frenchman will be at Arsenal 
to manage the French players 
who. if they can pass the ball 
with any imagination at all, 
will be the first signs of 
creative improvement in a 
team growing so old and so 
stagnant It would appear that 
Arsenal are waiting for 
Wenger to extricate himself 
from his obligation as the 
£700.000-a-year trainer to Na¬ 
goya Grampus Eight 

This, of course, may be 
Arsenal doing tilings proper¬ 
ly. The old-Etonian history of 
the club demands that they are 
not seen to poach another 
dub’s manager, especially one 
from a fledgeling league such 
as that in Japan. 

There remains some ex¬ 
plaining to do on the home 
front Peter Hill-Wood, the 
Arsenal chairman, while still 
neither confirming nor deny¬ 
ing that they have their man, 
said yesterday; The new 
manager has to be a first-class 
coach, someone to communi¬ 
cate with the players and the 
board. Football has gone inter¬ 
national in recent seasons and 
that is the route we will 
continue to follow.” 

Of the deposed Rioch, Hill- 
Wood said: “He hardly talked 
to us. We did not know what 
was going on or what his 
thoughts were." 

Really? Communication is a 
two-way process. Could it be 
that Arsenal, by repute one of 
the most accomplished dubs 
in the world, had not known of 
their communication prob¬ 
lem, or had suddenly found it 
so Insufferable just five days 
before the new season? 

Wenger will be a communi¬ 
cator ail right He comes, if 
that is not too presumptuous, 
highly recommended by the 
world-class players whom he 
has guided along the way. His 
education, with a degree in 
economics, would surely ease 
him into a boardroom accus¬ 
tomed to City talk. 

Yet the mathematics of his 
challenge would seem ex¬ 
treme. Eight players — Dixon, 
Winter bum, Bould, Linighan. 
Platt, Keown. Wright and, by 
October, Adams — are 30 or 
more. Garde is now another 
one and French sources say 
that his form over the past two 
seasons has dipped, either 
with age or with disaffection 
in Strasbourg. 

Added to all of this, Wenger, 
if and when he hits London, 
vail face the everyday 
Highbury story of taking care 
of the vulnerabilities in Paul 
Merson. The 28-year-old, stiU 
with the potential to be the 
kind of flair player Wenger 
can work with, has been 
talking rather too much while 
the dub is between managers. 

“You’ll never know how 
near I came to packing it in 
last week." Merson reportedly 
said. His problem was not a 
relapse into drink or drugs, 
but that he had missed a 
session with his counsellors. 

The manager, the now de¬ 
parted Rioch. put Merson 
straight, but it is indicative of 
the task facing whoever grap¬ 
ples with Arsenal Football 
Club that players, seemingly 
directors, and supporters are 
all in a state of dependency. 
The retreat from Japan cannot 
come soon enough. 



In today’s Times a 
four-page entry guide for 
Interactive Team Football 






Habib, of Leicestershire, leaps to avoid a fierce drive by Sohafl. of Pakistan, at Grace Road yesterday. Report page 42. Photograph; Hugh Routledge 


Masterkova shatters mile record 


From David Powell 

ATHLETICS CORRESPONDENT 
IN ZURICH 

SVETLANA MASTERKOVA. 
one of three athletes who left 
the Atlanta Olympics with two 
individual gold medals, last 
night set die first women’s 
world record of the season. 
More than that she achieved 
it in her first race over a mile. 

Masterkova took more than 
three seconds off the record, 
which had stood for seven 
years. In Atlanta, her 800/1500 
metres double went relatively 
unheralded compared with 
the 200/400 metres victories of 
Michael Johnson and Marie- 
Jos£ Perec However, here she 
left the sport in no doubt about 
her outstanding talent 
She set to the task in the 
manner of Noureddine 
Morceli, relying on a pace¬ 
maker to stretch her away 
from the field in the first lap. 
then taking up the running tor 
a solo effort during the last 660 
yards. Lyudmila Borisova, 
Masterkova's fellow Russian, 
took them through 440 yards 
in what appeared to be a 
suicidal 61.91 seconds. 

However, on the second lap. 
Borisova toned down the pace, 
taking her compatriot through 
880 yards in 2min 06.66sec At 
the end of the back straight on 
the third lap. Borisova stood 
aside and Masterkova 
reached the bell in 3:12.61. 

Masterkova picked up her 
pace down the back straight 
and around the top bend and. 
though she slowed in the 


home straight, she crossed the 
line in 4:1256. The record, 
which had been held by Paula 
Ivan since 1989, was 4:15.61. 

Masterkova received a 
$50,000 (about £35.000) bonus 
and a kilogram of gold, worth 
$12,000, for her world record. 

Jonathan Ridgeon rejected 
the greater financial rewards 
of running in the 400 metres 
hurdles A race to appear, by 
choice, in the B race instead, 
and reaped the benefit on the 
dock — if not in the pocket 
Ridgeon opted for lane eight in 
the support event in prefer¬ 
ence to the tight bend and 
built-up curb he would have 
had to negotiate running in 
lane one in the main race. 

Ridgeon’s reward was the 
fastest time of his comeback 


and almost a 


lal best 



Jarrett: poor season 


l person, 

He finished a dose second to 
Eric Thomas, of the United 
States, recording 4S.79sec 
compared with the winner’s 
48.69. 

The silver medal-winner in 
the sprint hurdles at the I9S7 
world championships, 
Ridgeon. now 29, is the all- 
time British No 4 over the one- 
lap hurdles. Only Kriss 
Akabusi, David Hemery and 
Alan Pascoe have run quicker 
than the 48.73sec that Ridgeon 
docked in 1992 

Ridgeon retired after the 
World Cup in 1992 his career 
seemingly brought to an end 
by Achilles tendon troubles. 
However, this year, after four 
operations, he returned to 
competition, initially having 
resumed running mainly to 
keep fit 

Typical of his luck, he 
enjoyed uninterrupted train¬ 
ing and racing until just 
before the Olympics, when he 
strained a calf. After his first 
round, he was eliminated. “It 
was 50-50 whether I was going 
to run so what I am doing 
here, frustratingly. is what l 
thought I would have achieved 
at the Games." Ridgeon said. 

Surprisingly, for an athlete 
who has run 24 hurdles races 
already this season. Ridgeon 
added: “I have got a lot more 
running in me. When I came 
back this season. I had no idea 
what time to expect. Since I 
started training again 1 have 
had only one problem and it 
just happened to be in tire 
week of the Olympics." 


Instead of the 49.43sec he 
ran in his Olympic semi-final, 
Ridgeon probably would have 
been on the fringe of the sub- 
48 5s ec needed to reach the 
final. However, his perfor¬ 
mance here is the encourage¬ 
ment he needs for his winter 
training and progress towards 
a place in the final at the world 
championships in Athens next 
year. 

Tony Jarrett won the 110 
metres hurdles B race. Jarrett. 
who has had a poor season by 
his standards, despite beating 
Allen Johnson, the Olympic 
champion, and Colin Jackson 
at Crystal Palace last Sunday, 
won in 13.38sec, ahead of Steve 
Brown, another American. 

Angela Thorp, who erased 


Sally Gunnell’s 100 metres 
hurdles British record in the 
Olympic semi-finals, but nar¬ 
rowly missed a place in the 
final, was unable to recapture 
the form that she showed in 
Atlanta here. She failed to 
reach the final, finishing sev¬ 
enth in 13.09sec. Her British 
record is 12S)sec. 

The 800 metres B race was 
won in Imin 43.26sec by 
Sammy Langat, of Kenya, the 
sixth fastest time in the world 
this year. More important, it 
raised expectations for the A 
race later in the evening, in 
which Wilson Kipketer, the 
world champion, was expect¬ 
ed to chase Sebastian Coe’s 
world record of lmin 4l.73sec, 
set in 1981. 


Currie and Quinn move back 
into Premiership spotlight 


ASTON VILLA and Sunder¬ 
land made the most signifi¬ 
cant moves on a busy day of 
transfer activity yesterday. Vil¬ 
la agreed a fee of £4 million 
with Bolton Wanderers for 
Sasa Currie while Niall Quinn 
renewed his working relation¬ 
ship with Peter Reid, the 
Sunderland manager, in sign¬ 
ing from Manchester Cny. 
Meanwhile, Queens Park 
Rangers, relegated from the 
FA Carling Premiership along 
with Bolton and City, warned 
Le e ds United off their prize 
asset, Trevor Sinclair. 

Villa's capture of Currie, the 
Yugoslavia midfield player, 
represents a dub record fee. 
“It’s an incredible sum." Brian 
Little, the yUla manager, said, 
"but Sasa is one of a group of 
three or four players whom I 
have always seen as potential 
Aston Villa players. 

TVe spoken to Bolton on 
and off for six or right months 
about him. It’s one of those 


By Peter Ball 

things where you wait for the 
phone call, and the go-ahead 
has been given." 

With his skill and eagerness 
to run at defenders, Currie 
quickly became a hero at 
Bumden Park but relegation 
made his departure look inev¬ 
itable. He will have to wait for 
a new work permit and will 
miss the start of the season. 

Quinn came cheaper. Sun¬ 
derland finally agreeing to 
meet Manchester City's ask¬ 
ing price of £13 million after 
stalling for some weeks. 
Quinn had still to agree his 
personal terms last night, but 
he was delighted to move back 

into the Premiership, particu¬ 
larly to work with Rad. “I had 
my best spell under Peter at 
Maine Road." Quinn said 
yesterday. “I said when he was 
sacked there that he will be a 
great manager, and I'm look¬ 
ing forward to be playing for 
him again. 

“Iris a huge career move for 


me. i'd been trying to ignore 
all the hype and the buzz of die 
new Premiership season 
because 1 was a bit jealous, 
and it’s thrilling to be given 
the chance to play up there 
again." 

City meanwhile are giving a 
trial to die unlikely-named 
Elvis Brajkovic, a member of 
the Croatia squad in die 
European championship. 
Brajkovic, whose mother was 
a-Presley rather than a Costel¬ 
lo fan, is a tall central defender 
who is out of contract after 
ending his spell with Munich 
I860. 

One transfer apparently not 
going through is that of Sin¬ 
clair to Leals. “I’m sick erf 
hearing speculation about 
Trevor." Clive Berlin. Rang¬ 
ers’ chief executive, said. “I’ve 
written to Leeds asking diem 
to desist from publidy specu¬ 
lating about our players, and 
if they continue to do so. well 
report them to the FA." 


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New poaching of 
Kenya elephants 
provokes outrage 

From Sam If*...._ 


OVERSEAS 13 


MARTYN COL&ECK 


CONSERVATIONISTS ves- 
(enlay reacted with outrage to 
an nn in illegal hunting 
and poaching of semi-lam? 
elephants from Amboseli Nat¬ 
ional Park in Kenya.They al so 
condemned Dr David West- 

dirraor “ f Kenya 
Wildlife Services. For an “inad¬ 
equate response" to the 
problem. 

The latest victim was discov¬ 
ered less than a mile inside 
Tanzania yesterday as Kenya 
Wildlife Services held a cele- 
bration to mark its fifrieth 
anniversary. Jake, who was 
31, was shot dead and his 
jusks were removed. Foot- 
paints leading from the car¬ 
cass indicated that he had 
been shot by local poachers. 

Another elephant, identified 
as Beach Bali, was found dead 
close to the Amboseli park 
headquarters two days before 

The increase in the" killing of 
Amboseli’s big tuskers, some 
of which are more than 50 
^years old and have been 


From Sam Kiley in Nairobi 

studied at close quarters for 2S 

ahu \- has P Ia “ despite 

a hunting ban on elephants in 
an eight-mile-wide buffer znne 

nir?.?!! 3 ' 7110 mne - Which 
runs along Amboseii's bor¬ 
ders. was set up after the 
unsportsmanlike hunting of 
five elderly bulls was exposed 
by The Times in WW. The 
elephants, which were accus¬ 
tomed to people, were slaugh- 
tered by white professional 

™u c isr e $2oao ° 

Since then, up to 11 other 
ntale elephants have been 
killed, eight of them in the pasi 
six weeks, and two oihers are 
Jessing. Three females, 
Qarla. Genette and Zsazsa. 
are also assumed to have been 
killed as their calves are being 
fostered by other females. The 
deaths of matriarchs is partic¬ 
ularly worrying, researchers 
say. because they reach youn¬ 
ger animals how to find water 
and food. 

The news of the killings has 



Hashimoto: sent funds 
to Philippine women 

Apology 
> by Japan 
to war 
sex slaves 

From Robert Whymaistt 
IN TOKYO 

andAbbyTan - 
IN MANILA 

JAPAN’S Prime Minister. 
Ryu taro Hashimoto, yester¬ 
day expressed his country’s 
remorse for degrading Asian 
women by forcing them into 
sexual slavery for Japanese 
soldiers before and during the 
Second World War. 

In a letter delivered to 
former sex slaves in the Phil¬ 
ippines. together with com¬ 
pensation money, Mr Hashi¬ 
moto admitted the involve¬ 
ment of the former Japanese 
Imperial Army in setting up 
brothels for troops advancing 
across Asia. Historians esti¬ 
mate that up to 200.000 
women, mostly from the Ko¬ 
rean peninsula, were forced 
into sexual servitude. 

Three hundred surviving 
“comfort women", as they are 
known in Japan, are being 
offered two million yen 
(£12£00) each from a nomi¬ 
nally private fund set up by 
die Government Tokyo is 
afraid that direct government 
compensation would unleash 
a flood of claims from other 
victims of Japan’s wartime 
aggression, including thou¬ 
sands of forced labourers and 
prisoners of war. 

Some former sex slaves in 
South Korea, Taiwan and the 
Philippines are reluctant to 
accept the money, insisting on 
direct compensation from the 
Japanese Government 
The first three payments 
were made yesterday, on the 
'gve of the 51st anniversary of 
Japan’s surrender in the war. 
"MakDto Arima. vice-president 

£<jftheAsian Women's Fund of 
BJapan, handed the money to 
: Maria Rosa Henson. 68, 
Rufina Fernandez. M, and 
Atanaaa Cortes, 73, at a 
cere m ony in a Manila hotel. 
The Japanese Ambassador to 
the Philippines Hiroyuki 
Yushita, gave them copies of 
Mr Hashimoto's letter the 
most contrite apology from 
Japan to the sex slaves so tar. 



India halts 
progress on 
nuclear ban 

Geneva: India has prevented 
the forwarding of a global 
nuclear test-ban treaty to the 
full Conference on Disarma¬ 
ment, Western diplomats said. 

Asked after a closed com¬ 
mittee meeting if the Indian 
representative had said she 
could not accept transmission 
of the text, Stephen Ledogar. of 
America said: “Yes, they did. 
just as they had last night in 
the informal meeting." 

Arundhati Ghose, the Indi¬ 
an delegate, made no immedi¬ 
ate comment after leaving die 
committee meeting, chaired 
by Jaap Ramaker. of The 
Netherlands. The committee 
was reconvening last night to 
draft its report. (Reuter) 

Israel to control 
Hebron security 

Jerusalem: Israel is planning 
to retain security control over 
the West Bank city of Hebron, 
effectively dedaring that the 
Palestinians cannot be trusted 
to protect the town’s minority 
Jewish population numbering 
about 400 (Ross Dunn writes). 
The plan, due to be presented 
to the Government this week, 
would require the rewriting of 
a peace accord signed with the 
Palestine Liberation Organis¬ 
ation which Binyamin 
Netanyahu, the right-wing Is¬ 
raeli' Prime Minister, had 
promised to uphold. 

Kitchen hand in 
poisons arrest 

Bombay: A young kitchen 
helper was arrested yesterday 
in India’s worst case of food 
poisoning as the death toll 
mounted to 46, with nine 
patients dying in Bombay 
hospitals after battling for life 
for nearly a week. At least 45 
others are in serious condi¬ 
tion. Blood samples of victims, 
who suffered giddiness, aches 
and vomiting, are being ana¬ 
lysed in London. Seeds of a 
white Datura (thorn apple) 
weed are suspected. (Reuter) 

Sacked minister 
at ANC hearing 

Johannesburg: In the biggest 
crisis the African National 
Congress has faced since tak¬ 
ing power, Bantu Holomisa, 
the sacked Environment Min¬ 
ister, appeared before a disci¬ 
plinary hearing to answer 
charges linked to corruption 
allegations against senior 
ANC leaders (Imgo Gilmore 
writes). If found guilty, he ts 
likely to be expelled or sus¬ 
pended from the ANC. 


ichi march fired on 

. . . * .i__rn rele- 


HID HUSSAIN 
ajrachi 

dlled at least 12 
rounded H when 
fire on an Inde- 


Prophet Muhammad] to cele¬ 
brate the 49th anniversary of 

Pakistan’s independent. 

Pblice suspect that a n 


SWa Muslim group. Dbrik 
rt on on Ind^ Jaffa™, was tw**^ 

rally organised snack £ h a vrngr ihc 

luslim Oharas- aw Muslims 

hi’s New Town ™ ri s ?^ h aba in' **■ 

marchers 

with machine- P H|S b f rou ps have been 
of a mosque. ™ in g h lo«Jy street wars ui 

—SSio-t-SPS 


incensed conservationists in 
Kenya. Many blame Dr West¬ 
ern for reacting too slowly to 
the problem. 

His predecessor. Dr Rich¬ 
ard Leakey, condemned Dr 
Western. "1 am extremely 
disappointed and angry about 
this. 

“For millions of shillings to 
be budgeted for the fiftieth 
anniversary celebrations 
while field staff are inade¬ 
quately resourced is outra¬ 
geous. These bulls are very 
important, not only scientifi¬ 
cally. but because they are the 
last of the really big tuskers 
that people can come to see in 
East Africa." said Dr Leakey. 

He said that the wildlife 
service had kept details of the 
Amboseli elephant killings 
and poaching elsewhere 
“secret, like in the worst days 
of poaching in Kenya” 

Senior wardens ar the wild¬ 
life service headquarters did 
not appear to have heard 
about the latest killings yester- 





Beach Ball, right, the elephant found dead at the hands of poachers two days ago. with Lexi, another member of the Amboseli park herd 


day. Jake’s carcass was discov¬ 
ered by a researcher from the 
Save the Elephant charity, 
lain Douglas Hamilton, its 
director, said that the tuskers 
often wandered into Tanzania 
in search of food before the 
mating season. 

“These killings are totally 
illegal and some look like they 


have been carried out by 
professional hunters." he said. 
Other sources said there had 
been repons of a Masai poach¬ 
er operating on land next to 
Amhoseli who had been 
tracked by rangers with the 
wildlife service's ami-poach¬ 
ing unit. 

Dr Cynthia Moss, whose 


film Echo of the Elephants: 

The Next Generation helped 
to transform thinking about 
the animals, said the death of 
Beach Ball had caused her 
great grief. “He was one of my 
favourite elephants." she said. 
One of Dr Moss’s revelations 
was that elephants “mourn" 
their dead. 


She said Beach Balt, who 
was known locally as 
Mjomba, the Swahili word for 
unde, was so tame that child¬ 
ren could approach him. 
''They would roll tyres to¬ 
wards him. and he would roll 
them back." she said. 

British conservationists 
were dismayed yesterday by 


news of the renewed poaching. 
Sir David Attenborough said: 
“if these elephants can be 
poached, then what chance is 
rhere for those less protected? 

"They are the most famous 
elephants, known to millions 
of people through television 
programmes. It is dismal 
news." 






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]4 BODY AND MIND 


TUI ,nc D AY AUGUST 151996 
the TIMES THURSUAij- 


JOHN tfciiv IMAGE BAN* 


'fr.-'-r* •• 








Dr Thomas Stuttaford on the 

latest thinking on baby 
delivery; plus the difficulties 
of predicting the behaviour of 
former psychiatric patients, 
fresh anxiety over food 
poisoning, a standardised 
approach to asthma, and a new 
drive to vaccinate children 


How mums 
can pass the 
tennis test 


I n the introduction to this 
week’s Woman's Hour 
programme on confine¬ 
ments, a hospital deliv¬ 
ery was portrayed as a 
dehumanising experience, 
with the conduct of the labour 
determined by high-tech 
machinery. 

(n contrast, it implied that 
the patients who elected to stay 
at home would have their 
babies easily and safely and be 
surrounded by loving rela¬ 
tives. Would that this was so. 
A normal delivery can 
only be diagnosed in 
retrospect and the 
truth is that in Britain 
the safest place for the 
baby and mother is a 
well-run hospital lab¬ 
our ward. 

In the general prac¬ 
tice where I started the nearest 
major hospital was 20 miles 
away, but even so SO per cent 
of babies were booked for 
delivery at home. Although we 
made an inspired guess and 
weeded out those mothers who 
obviously were at high risk, 
neither 1 nor the midwife knew 
what would happen until the 
labour was over. 

Many of our patients lived 
in outlying villages. As it 
would rake’ too long to get to 
them in the event of a disaster 
occurring in the later stages of 
labour, I spent many nights 
sleeping on the sofas in'the 
sitting-room, forceps ar the 
ready, while the woman went 
through the early stages of 



labour upstairs. As the Radio 4 
programme implied, home de¬ 
liveries — once the baby was 
bom and crying — were often 
uproarious family occasions. 
But not all of them were 
conducted in total harmony. 

On one occasion a baby 
showed signs of distress which 
made delivery a matter of 
urgency’, but the mother was 
loo upset to keep stiQ to have 
the necessary local anaesthetic 
block before the forceps could 
be applied. Before I could stop 
him, the husband took 
command. He deliv¬ 
ered a quick left and 
right which could not 
disgrace Mohammed 
Alt and thereafter the 
woman lay very still. 
The baby was deliv¬ 
ered safely. 

The primary objective of 
any delivery must be that it 
should be achieved without 
cost to the mother's health and 
that the baby should be 
healthy. Standards are forever 
increasing and. not surpris¬ 
ingly. women are no longer 
happy to have survived. Now 
they expect to be as fit and well 
as they were before they 
became pregnant. 

Mr Stuart Stanton, of St 
Georges Hospital. London, is 
one of a new breed of 
gynaecologists. He is a consul¬ 
tant urogynaecologist. a gy¬ 
naecologist who makes a 
speciality of dealing with blad¬ 
der and rectal problems. The 
sub-speciality is assured of a 


ready supply of patients, for 
research at St Georges has 

shown that 70 per cent of 
women are still incontinent of 
urine three months after deliv¬ 
ery of a baby and 4 per cent 
are incontinent of faeces. 

The situation improves dur¬ 
ing subsequent months but 
relapse occurs later and if the 
condition is untreated about a 
third of women who have had 
children will have some stress 
incontinence when, for in¬ 
stance, playing tennis, when 
they are older. 

The origins of the problem 
of incontinence after delivery 
lies in the damage done to the 
woman’s pelvic floor during 
labour. The pelvic floor is an 
efficient shelf of muscles that 
supports the bladder, uterus, 
vagina, and rectum. During a 
difficult delivery the nerves to 
these muscles can be damaged 
and the resulting injury may 
cause lasting social in¬ 
convenience. 



R esearch workers at 
St Georges are now 
investigating the 
possibility which 
women have pelvic floors 
which are likely to suffer in 
labour. It is hoped that the 
research will make it possible 
to offer those who are at 
greatest risk during natural 
labour an alternative form of 
delivery, which will spare the 
nerves to the pelvic floor. 

At St Georges the clinic is 
run jointly by Mr Stanton and 


Damage done in labour can cause some mothers to have stress incontinence when playing tennis 


Danger signs of 
violence in 
the disturbed 

-THE death of the 

rjMBk Rev Christopher 

tfrSTF Gray in Liverpool 

|jbk has already pro- 

duced the predict- 
able demands that 
people who are ex- 

_J1K — posed to life ,n 

Britain* in« r 

violent 

Grav’s death coincided with a report 
Tthe B%ish Medical Journal on 

the ways in which potential violence 
in former psychiatric patients may 
be predicted. . 

The study into violent former in¬ 
patients cost £45 mUlfon and was 

conducted in the United States " 
the survey, the former patients, 
together with somebody with whom 
they were in frequent contact, usual¬ 
ly a member of the family, was 
questioned every ten weeks about 
any incidents. 

The 1.000 patients, between the 
ages of 14 and 4ft were studied for a 
year, and as well as talking to the 
patient researchers also interviewed 
the police, and both police and 
hospital records were checked. 

IT WAS found that when patients 
did relapse into violent behaviour it 
was usuall y within the first month 
after their discharge from hospital. 
Regardless of the mental disorder 
that had necessitated treatment orig¬ 
inally. it was found that the tendency 
to violence was quadrupled by 
taking drugs or alcohol. Forty per 
cent of the patients studied, whatever 
their psychiatric disease, had a 
problem of drug or alcohol 
dependence. 

The most obvious danger signs of 
trouble ahead in a former patient 
were an inability to settle back in the 
community, a restlessness with fre¬ 
quent changes of address, a history 
of having an impulsive character, 
and a tendency to have violent 
fantasies. 

Although the survey has not 
uncovered any dramatic new symp¬ 
toms. which would lead those who 
are caring for discharged patients to 
expect a violent breakdown, it has 
emphasised and itemised the factors 
that often precede outbreaks of 
violence. 


Mr Devinder Kumar, a rec¬ 
tum surgeon, and they see 
patients together while they 
decide on the best forms of 
treatment. Results in those 
patients who have needed 
surgery are most encouraging. 
Ninety per cent of the women 
overcome their incontinence 
and even IS years later 80 per 
cent are still symptom-free 
and enjoying their tennis. 

Despite the disadvantages 
of Caesarean section,' a re¬ 



m 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

CO 




J 


The Marquesa, 
Hello! magazine’s 
Mrs Fix-it, 
reveals ail 



search study shows that many 
gynaecologists when pregnant 
opt for it without medical 
justification. In Mr Stanton’s 
opinion this is partly the result 
of anxiety over incontinence. 
He hopes that when all the 
research at St Georges is 
complete it will only be those 
who have a demonstrable risk 
of pelvic floor trouble who will 
choose to have surgery, and 
the rest .win entrust them¬ 
selves to the midwives. 


Asthma at a 
snail’s pace 

ASTHMA can be induced 
by a wide variety of agents. 
One of the most common 
is the housemite. a micro¬ 
scopic organism which 
lives in the carpets, curtains 
and blankets of most mod¬ 
em, weff-heated houses. 

Recent research in Italy 
has shown that many people 
whose asthma attacks are 
induced by the housemite 
may also suffer if they eat 
a hearty meal of snails. Care¬ 
ful immunological studies 
have suggested that it is the 
housemite which 
sensitises gourmets to snails. 
Investigations have not 
shown that being allergic to 
snails necessarily makes 
people sensitive to the 
housemite. 

THE way to treat asthma 
is now being standardised in 
Britain. As a result the 
number of deaths from acute 
attacks is falling, although 
the number of patients with 
the disease is on the 
increase. 

One source of contin¬ 
uing disaster has been high¬ 
lighted recently by chest 
physicians. There has been 
doubt about the length of 
time the patient, who has had 
a serious attack of asthma, 
should continue to take the 
oral steroids prescribed to 
control it Many doctors only 
give them for seven days, 
but the general view is that a 
14-day course is not only 
more effective, but much saf¬ 
er in the long terra. 

The British Thoracic As¬ 
sociation is also expected to 
publish new recommenda¬ 
tions on the treatment of asth¬ 
ma in the near future. It is 
predicted that they will sug¬ 
gest treatment of an ac u te 
attack of asthma with inhaled 
steroids should start with 
a high dosage, and thereafter 
be reduced once control of 
the attack is achieved. 


Fears of botulism 
spread to nursery 


T o an older generation 
the diagnosis of botu¬ 
lism has a sinister ring. 
The organism. Clostridium 
botulinum , was responsible 
for the production of the 
neurotoxin that paralysed the 
nervous system after deep, 
contaminating wounds on the 
Western Front in the First 
Worfd War. During the 1939- 
1945 war it became a cause of 
anxiety on the home front 
when tins of food, which had 
been hoarded, became con¬ 
taminated if the meat or fish 
that they contained had been 
infected with Clostridium 
botulinum. 


Food poisoning 
in infants has led 
to a ban on 
honey for babies 

In food-bome botulism, the 
effects of damage to the central 
nervous system are preceded 
by vomiting, diarrhoea and 
severe abdominal pain. Botu¬ 
lism isn’t confined to those 
serving in a battle zone, or 
those who have just eaten 
meat from a rusting tin. A 
famous outbreak occurred in 
Scotland during the 1920s 





Honey can be a health risk for children under a year 


THE campaign to na the 
country of measles, mumps 
and German measles (rubel¬ 
la). is proving to be very 
effective. Despite the success 
of the immunisation pro¬ 
gramme, Pulse magazine re¬ 
ports rhat the Department of 
Health still fears a possibility 
of a bufid-up in susceptible 
children between the ages of 
four and six, which could lead 
to an epidemic. 


Measles 

campaign 

To prevent this from hap¬ 
pening, an amended pro¬ 
gramme of MMR (measles, 
mumps and rubella) is to start 
this autumn. Family doctors 
will be encouraged to give a 
second dose of MMR to pre¬ 
school children of the appro¬ 


priate age. not immunised in 
the campaign of 1994. 

Side effects from the injec¬ 
tions are comparatively rare 
and only occasionally have 
serious consequences been re¬ 
ported. On the other hand, 
measles can be lethal and 
frequently resulted in lasting 
disability. Mumps can cause 
lifelong infertility, and rubella 
was responsible for many 
foetal abnormalities. 


after duck pate had become 
infected - . In 1978 there was 
another epidemic in Britain, 
which Had been caused by 
contaminated tinned salmon. 

In America home-canned veg¬ 
etables are the usual culprits 
behind an outbreak, whereas 
on the Continent it is sausages 
that are reviewed with criti¬ 
cism. The term botulism is 
derived from the Latin for a 
sausage, botulus, so it seems 
that even the advancing le¬ 
gionnaires had to contend 
with the problem. 

Anxieties about botulism 
have now spread to the nurs¬ 
ery. Usually food-bome botu¬ 
lism is related to the ingestion 
of toxins that have already 
been produced by the organ¬ 
ism. However, in one group oL 
children, infants under a year? 
the guts are capable of acting 
as a medium, which is suitable 
for the spores to germinate, 
after which the Clostridium 
botulinum multiplies until it 
colonises the gut In these 
children, the attack isn't 
because they have ingested the 
toxin but is a consequence of 
the production of it in their 
guts, which is then absorbed. 

I nfant botulism is very 
rare, particularly in Brit¬ 
ain but it is rather more 
common in America. In Amer¬ 
ica a common cause of infant 
botulism is from spores that 
have been ingested with hon¬ 
ey. As a consequence of the 
American cases. Sir Kenneth 
Caiman, the Chief Medical 
Officer of Health, has written 
to all doctors to warn them of 
this unlikely hazard to infant 
life. Although there has been 
no proven case in Britain of 
honey causing infantile botu- 
nsm it is a potentially serious rt 
health risk. V f 

Therefore the British Honey 

importers and Packers Associ¬ 
ation have joined the Depart¬ 
ment of Health to issue a joint 
recommendation that babies 
under a year shouldn’t be 
given any. Honey for tea 
might have been an admirable 
freat m Grantchester but in 
future any nanny will have to 
reserve it for her older child¬ 
ren, and for adults, whose guts 
have matured and in whom 
the spores of Clostridium hot- 
uhnum have no chance of 
surviving. 


Cheaper 

Car 

insurance 

Admiral 

Can now 

.0800 600 800 



























111 

rv 








^a g S PAVA UGUS rK, n o. 

I’m spoilt and 

unbelievably 

lucky’ 

N Coitrane dormed^a SePrir!^" fu/T hi * friend - with Princess Diana, her cii 
habit and ally, and Prince Charles. 1 

to star in /V«»c n» equerry. Now. Soames is now contend 


FEATURES 15 


CHRIS HARRIS 


N ot Since Robbie 
Cohrane donned a 
habit and wimple 
to star in Nuns On 
■ jrie Kun nas there been a less 
\ a“*y postulant than Nicholas 
Soames. Minister of State for 
the Armed Forces. 

We are ensconced in his 
elegant London town house to 
discuss those who shoulder 
arms for the realm, and the 
step from Armalite to Carmel¬ 
ite seems a large one. Mr 
Soames. who scarcely evokes 
the ascetic lifestyle, achieves 
the leap nimbly. 

“When I became a minister I 

C >k vows of poverty, chastity 
d obedience, like a nun. f 
regard myself as a poor man." 
TTus is puzzling, particularly 
since we have just been nin- 
mng through a list of interests 
in which sackcloth looms less 
large than Jermyn Street tai¬ 
loring. “My God. I enjoy life. 1 
love foie gras, 1 love cham¬ 
pagne. I love venison. I adore 
everything; food, music, par¬ 
ties. girls. You know." 

But of course. I do know 
partly what he means. Noth¬ 
ing in the hedonist's checklist 
overrides his devotion to duty. 
Indeed, Mr Soames has ex¬ 
plained it so volubly that one 
begins — like a sock m a spin 
drier — to feel quite caught up 
in the whirl of his enthusiasm. 

Viewers of the BBC’s five- 
pan series Defence of the 
Realm, which continues to¬ 
night. may already have ab¬ 
sorbed some of his fervour. 

Armed Forces are the 
v&nchmark by which all other 
armed forces in the world 
judge themselves. Now that 
may sound like a paean of 
swank...” Rule one: when Mr 
Soames appears to be indulg¬ 
ing in what he would describe 
as “showing orf*. he is in fact 
doing nothing of the kind. 

His is a bred-in-lhe-bone 
passion. His grandfather. Sir 
Winston Churchill, and his 
father were Secretaries of State 
for War, and, as he says: 
“How could you not feel that 
son of wine of military history 
flowing in your veins?” 

On military matters, Mr 
Soames is unstoppable. Any 
deviation, however, provokes 
the sort of stare a scrupulous 
RSM might accord to a scuffed 
toecap. Even a minor diver¬ 
sion provokes much Biro- 
fiddling and foot-wriggling. 
Mention the Royal Family, 
and the open-ended Richter 
scale is likely to register trem¬ 
ors in SW1. 

3} Mr Soames adores the 
House of Windsor. He was 


seven when he met his friend, 

tne Prince of Wales, whom he 
later served as equerry. Now, 
the royal divorce over, he is 
livid about what he perceives 
as lasting harm inflicted by a 
voracious tabloid press. 

“Ido think it’s done damage; 
huge damage. You can hack 
away at the roots of these 
institutions, and to pretend 
you are nor damaging them is 
mindless idiocy.” Here, you 
may think. Mr Soames is 
being a little disingenuous, 
given the carpeting he received 
from John Major after declar¬ 
ing, in the wakeof the Princess 
of Wales’s Panorama inter¬ 
view, that she was “in the 
advanced stages of paranoia". 

Does he now regret that? 

‘I enjoy life. 

I love foie 
gras, I love 
champagne, 

I love 
venison* 


"Well. I very much regret the 
upset that it caused. I said it 
because I was very, very 
angry. I was intending to 
make a dignifed and sober 
response to what I thought 
was a tragedy unfurling be¬ 
fore our eyes, and I lost my 
temper, which was unfor¬ 
givable. 

"I regret having caused a 
row, and of course it further 
exacerbated what was an al¬ 
ready unhappy situation. I 
believe everyone in this coun¬ 
try is entitled to privacy and a 
degree of respecL The RpyaJ 
Family are flesh and blood, 
and what has been written 
about them wounds and hurts 
and is calculated to do so." 

The divorce over, is Prince 
Charles a more contented 
man? “It’s not for me to say. In 
your family, perhaps, and 
certainly in mine, these per¬ 
sonal catastrophes happen 
and are matters of deep and 
lasting regret When they hap¬ 
pen in public they are the more 
traumatic and horrible." 

While Mr Soames declines 
to compare his suffering with 
the anguish he has dearly 
observed in his friend, he has 
not been left unscathed. His 
first wife, Catherine Weather- 
all, left him for a ski instructor 
while on holiday in Klosters 


with Princess Diana, her dose 
ally, and Prince Charles. Mr 
Soames is now contentedly 
married to Serena and spends 
a great deal of time with his 11- 
year-old son. Harry. 

“1 cannot compare the trau¬ 
mas that the Royal Family 
have suffered io any in my 
own life. I have lived a 
wonderfully happy life, com¬ 
pared to almost everyone else I 
know in the whole world. 1 
graze in very, very happy 
pastures." Besides, as he says, 
hastily dispelling the vision of 
contented ruminant: “I am 
here to talk about the defence 
of the realm. I don’t mean to be 
rude, but.. 

While never rude, he is 
overpoweringly. gushingly, 
magnificently forceful. Strid¬ 
ing the deck of an aircraft- 
carrier. addressing the “lads" 
or the top brass, the image is 
that of a Blobbyesque Britan¬ 
nia, the bravura symbol of 
public service, military tradi¬ 
tion and all lhar made Britain 
great In a drawing-room the 
effect is more akin to sharing a 
lock-up garage with a tank. 
One can only console oneself 
that no interlocutor escapes 
tite Soames friendly fire. 

“I had a frightful row with 
Lady Thatcher the other day at 
a luncheon party. She was 
banging on about the Ger¬ 
mans. and — I have to tell you 
— the Germans are our allies 
and our dose, close friends.” 


Q uite, but what was 
Lady Thatcher ac¬ 
tually saying? “I’m 
not going into it. 
Lady Thatcher and 
many within this country 
deeply resent the Germans." 
Not to mention those within 
the Conservative Government. 

“I regard the Europhobes’ 
views as being damaging to 
the interests of our country, to 
the interests of our party and 
in every way to the interests of 
the nation. People’s morale is 
bad because they're fed this 
crap in the papers about 
foreigners and Europe and 
anti-this and ann-thaL" 

There is no point in under¬ 
lining the fact that his boss. 
Michael Portillo, is not famous 
for his Europhilia. since Mr 
Soames is — on one level — 
silkiiy diplomatic. fill tell you 
one thing. Michael Portillo 
has got the best manners of 
any minister I have ever met. 
He's punctilious, immaculate, 
tidy-minded and scrupulously 
correct and polite. That mat¬ 
ters. you know. It matters.") 
While Mr Soames's own man- 



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Nicholas Soames: “When I became a minister I took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. like a nun. I regard myself as a poor man" 


ners are unimpeachable, his 
tidiness of mind has on occa¬ 
sion seemed questionable. Did 
he, for instance, grossly mis¬ 
judge and play’ down the 
problems of BSE during his 
time at Agriculture? He says 
he mast declare an interest fT 
am president of the Sussex 
Cattle Breed Society”) and a 
lack of scientific expertise H 
failed my biology O level”). 

"No minister did anything 
without taking the advice of 
scientists. If you’re asldng 
whether I ever made a mis¬ 
take. the answer is you could 
probably write a book of the 
mistakes I made. Have 1 made 
am' mistakes on BSE? I hope 
not. I don’t think so." 

Again, on Gulf War Syn¬ 
drome, Mr Soames’s call for 
more research seemed inex¬ 
cusably slow. Naturally, he 
demurs. “You are asking if 1 
have any regrets. You make 


‘The 

Germans 




are our 
allies and 
our close 
friends’ 


me very arrogant in saying J 
haven’t” 

He wakes at five every 
morning and congratulates 
himself on his good fortune. “1 
think to be unemployed and 
bored would be unspeakable. I 
can’t wait to gei to my job and 
to come home to a loving wife 
and child. People will read this 
and say. ‘How spoilt* and I 
am very spoilt. I’m unbeliev¬ 
ably lucky, bui you have to live 
for the moment, because this 
won! last for ever. 

“1 would die for this job. 
Doing it has to be the greatest 
good fortune, other than eat¬ 
ing foie gras io the sound of 
trumpets. No need to laugh. 
It’s not original.” 

Besides, trumpets and foie 
gras fake second place to the 
credo of duty: poverty, chasti¬ 
ty, obedience. I am disappear¬ 
ing through the door when the 
Soames voice thunders down 
the hallway. 

“And don’t dwell on the 
Royal Family. I have said too 
much. I always do." he says in 
the gloomy boom of one whose 
vocation, however ardent, 
could never quire stretch to a 
vow of silence. 

• pan twn Ilf Defence or the Realm 
is on BBCi tonight ai 10pm. 


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16 _ 

Does destiny’s 
destination 
still matter? 

Magnus Iinklater says that Scots 
should care about their symbols of 
nationhood — and where they lie 


I t was. said John Major 
when he announced it, a 
symbolic gesture of the 
greatest significance. The re¬ 
turn to Scotland of die Stone of 
Destiny from its ancient rest¬ 
ing place beneath the Corona¬ 
tion Chair in Westminster 
Abbey would restore this 
“most ancient symbol of Scot¬ 
tish kingship... to its historic 
homeland". The stone, he said, 
"had a special place in the 
hearts of Scots”. 

The reaction among the 
Scots themselves was curious¬ 
ly flat. The Prime Minister’s 
motives were subjected to 
some sceptical analysis; the 
odd political insult was traded; 
even the welcoming remarks 
came across in that rather 
dismissive Scottish manner 
which actually means: “What 
took you so long?" 

Still, as Midtael Forsyth, 
the Scottish Secretary, said, it 
was an opportunity for the 
people themselves to express 
their views on where they 
wanted this emblem of Scot¬ 
tish nationhood to have its 
final resting place. He invited 
submissions. This week marks 
the deadline, and the Scottish 
Office has been sift¬ 
ing through die an¬ 
swers. There has 
not. it seems, been 
an overwhelming 
response. Various 
worthy organis¬ 
ations have had 
their say, the odd 
peer of the realm 
has chipped in with 
suggestions, the 
Historiographer 
Royal has pro¬ 
nounced. and there 
has been a scatter¬ 
ing of views, some 
eccentric, some 
sensible. Grom private dtizens 
— but not that many. Com¬ 
pared to the hysteria that 
greeted its theft from West¬ 
minster Abbey in 1950. the 
reaction has been apathetic at 
best For a piece of rock tinged 
with the blood of Scottish 
warriors down the ages, it has 
been a definite anti-dimax. 

Perhaps we have lost faith in 
symbols. I have yet to hear 
that swords have leapt from 
their scabbards to prevent the 
latest sacrilege, namely a plan 
to dig up the heart of Robert 
the Bruce from its burial place 
in Melrose Abbey. The idea is 
to test the lead casket in which 
it was interred to see whether 
it is authentic. Quite where 
this will get us is undear. 

I cannot help feeling that Sir 
James, the Blade Douglas, 
who cut tiie heart from Bruce's 
body in 1329 and set off oa a 
pilgrimage to take it to the 
Holy Land, would not have 
been best pleased. “Now pass 
thou onward as thou wert 
wont, and Douglas will follow 
or did" he cried as he hurled 
the heart and its casket into the 
thick of the battle before being 
cut down by a Moorish army 
in Castile. He said nothing 
about wanting Historic Scot¬ 
land to dig it up again once it 
had been finally buried. 

Here again. 1 am afraid to 
report apathy appears to hold 
sway, although we must 
watch the letters pages of The 
Scotsman, where Scottish 
swords are still occasionally 
unsheathed. 

But if the symbols of past 
struggles no longer excite us, 
what does? For most people, 
the concept of kingship, which 
both stone and heart repre¬ 


sent. has been drained of 
meaning, despite the Prime 
Minister’s claims. National¬ 
ists in Scotland are embar¬ 
rassed by it; Tories tiptoe 
gingerly around it; the fact 
that Labour is being asked by 
the Fabian Society to review 
the monarchy as “the last 
taboo”, and to invite Sir An¬ 
drew Lloyd Webber to com¬ 
pose a new national anthem, 
suggests that it may no longer 
be taken seriously by the party 
which could form the next 
government. 

All tiiis would have troubled 
Walter Bagehot, who wrote 
that the constitution could 
hold the people together only if 
It contained two elements: 
“First, those which exdte and 
preserve the reverence of the 
population — the dignified 
parts, if I may so call them; 
and next the efficient parts —- 
those by which it in fact 
works and rules.’' It seems as 
if the dignified parts are in 
need of some attention, to say 
nothing of the efficient parts. 
So perhaps the whole edifice 
really may be crumbling at 
Last 

A better explanation, how¬ 
ever. is the one 
suggested by Sir 
David Steel, when 
he said that most 
people in Scotland 
“want not just the 
symbol but the 
substance of the re¬ 
turn of democratic 
control”. Mr Ma¬ 
jor’s announce¬ 
ment intended as 
an acknowledg¬ 
ment of Scottish as¬ 
pirations, was 
dropped into a pot 
itical vacuum. A 
relic, wholly associ¬ 
ated with the exercise of kingly 
power, was being returned to 
a nation which no longer 
exercises that power, or any¬ 
thing like it Since it came 
unaccompanied by political 
change, it was widely seen as 
an empty gesture, not to say a 
piece of political opportunism. 

That does not mean, how¬ 
ever. that it should simply be 
ignored. The stone is impor¬ 
tant as any truly historic relic 
is, and its fate should exdte 
interest passion even. It is not 
just a king's seat it represents 
the continuity of a nation, a 
memorial to its past and an 
emblem for its future 
achievements. 

T he stone deserves a hal¬ 
lowed place, but one 
that is independent of 
religious factions. My own 
proposal is Edinburgh Castle, 
as others have suggested, but 
not the room where die Scot¬ 
tish regalia are stored. That is 
a tourist trap, stage-lit and 
shorn of Bagehofs “reverence" 
— a sort of "crown jewels 
experience". 

Instead, it should go to the 
great National War Memorial 
in the castle, a building dedi¬ 
cated not just to Scotland’s war 
dead, but to all its people. It is 
not a chapel, but it has great 
dignity and an almost palpa¬ 
ble sense of Scotland's martial 
past Through its floor app¬ 
ears the living rock, and it is a 
physical part of the Palace 
Close. 

[f destiny means anything, 
this is where the stone should 
be — almost literally linked to 
Scotland's history. 

As for Bruoels heart leave it 
alone. 


Quite where 
digging up 
the heart of 
Robert the 
Bruce from 
Melrose 
Abbey will 
get us 
is unclear 


THE TIMES 


THURSDAY AUGUST 151996 



E 


nglish people have only die 
most blurred notions of eccle¬ 
siastical structures and titles; 
but they do generally recognise “die 
vicar" as “someone who does things 
on behalf of others". There is some¬ 
thing affectionate about: ‘Hello, Vic¬ 
ar." There is something affirming 
about “Now we have a lady vicar". 
“Murder of a vicar outside his 
church" was a headline that deeply 
shocked us, touching off many an 
editorial or Thought for the Day. 

There is a great deal of talk about 
“care in the community”, but vicars 
are among the few people profession¬ 
ally concerned about it who actually 
live in their community. For under¬ 
standable reasons, doctors, teachers, 
nurses, social workers tend to com¬ 
mute. The urban vicarage continues 
to be a sanctuary in a hostile world. If 
there is no one to fail back on. there is 
always the vicar. Here is rare 
continuity with the Benedictine tradi¬ 
tions of stabilitas and hospitality 
which gave Christian life in this 
country its original shape. Stabilitas 
refers to the one who remains and 
who is there to serve a community. 
Hospitality reminds us of a central 
thrust of the Christian Gospel. 

The idea is hard to sustain. It 
makes heavy demands, but it makes 
the vicar more accessible than those 
many public officials who can rarely 
be met face to face and then rally by 
appointment and in office hours. I 


Reflections on the 
death of a vicar 


recall two visits I made in the 19S0s: 
one to a mining village during the 
miners’ strike and one to a deprived 
inner-city area in Liverpool During 
both 1 was encouraged by the extra¬ 
ordinarily intimate connection be¬ 
tween the vicar and the mixed bag of 
parishioners that I met Here was the 
Church’s ministry at its best unpub- 
lidsed, uncommented on. but exceed¬ 
ingly important For it seems to me 
that beneath the surface of the most 
placid-seeming parish or district 
there is always a hidden ferment 
Individuals and families are contin¬ 
ually being threatened or uplifted, 
disappointed or delighted over mat¬ 
ters which are of importance to them 
— from the birth of a child to the 
death of aparent from a quarrel with 
a neighbour to a promotion at work, 
from the onset or cure of illness to the 
loss or finding of a job. 

Such personal matters are the very 
stuff and substance of human con¬ 
cern, and in the response of people to 


them there is always {implicitly or 
explicitly} a slight shift in their 
religious attitude — a slight move¬ 
ment either towards or away from 
God. The vicar who is close enough to 
many of his parishioners to become 
aware of these points and times of 
sensitivity, and who is available and 
attentive when and where they occur, 
does a work of extreme importance. 
For it is widely believed (rightly or 
wrongly) that the attitude of a vicar is 
a living symbol—faint and imperfect 
but the rally living symbol we nave — 
of die attitude of God Himself. 
Therefore his presence and attentive¬ 
ness. or his absence and seeming 
indifference, is likely to affect a 
person at a deep level at such times of 
acute sensitivity. Hie movement of a 
human soul or a whole human 
family towards or away from God 
may well be determined by the 
"minute particular" of whether the 
vicar calls or does not call on a 
parishioner who is gravely ill. wheth¬ 


er he is accessible or not to an 
unhappy teenager or a proud parent. 

Much of the typical work of vicars 
is too particular to be the subject of 
general discussion and too intimate 
to be made known in books or jour¬ 
nals or investigated by research 
students. So the names of outstand¬ 
ing vicars tend to be less well known 
than those who work in the academic 
field or become bishops. But the effect 
and influence of their work is. I dare 
to say. much deeper. For the attitude 
of most people to God is determined, 
for good or ill, not by general ideas or 
intellectual formulations, but by con¬ 
crete signs and evidences erf the 
nearness of God in these common¬ 
place yet sensitive situations. 

Increasingly, we look for people of 
character to undertake such a voca¬ 
tion. We look first for faith, and with 
it faithfulness, die capacity to go on 
when the going gets tough. We look 
for evidence of a life of prayer, 
because prayer is required of a vicar. 


bo* » t"S 

job and as_ a stgn for commit- 
pointmg others. J!g 0 [ e the strong 

menito people, t and ^ 

ISpriJS. W?took for l 

hrnrrs without obvious reward. We 

hours wirnou ^ ^ 

the successful graduate of the man- 
Christopher 

Gray and sympathise with fosfarmty 
and parish; but in 

to sav: “He was 3 good man, but ne- 
shouid have been more streetwise. 

We may indude in clergy naming 
more attention to pnidenccin the 
inner dty: get the Church Conurus 
sioners to look at the security of 
vicarages. That all sounds very 

But we should be failing him if we . 
did not attend to prerious principles 
in our Christian heritage which 
belong to no one denomination, but 
which are being eroded or jettisoneq 
or represented as inappropriate for a 
much better managed church, or a 
more vulnerable and quite fragile 
secular society. 

Lord Runde was Archbishop of 
Canterbury. 1980-91. 


/ 


No EMU without a superstate 


Once again, Europe should 
listen to Denmark: the single 
currency is about democracy 


D emocracy is the 
real European is¬ 
sue. As tiie Ger¬ 
man Constitut¬ 
ional Court has already found, 
the structures of the European 
Union are not in themselves 
democratic. Such democracy 
as exists in Europe is derived 
from the election of the 15 
national governments, not 
from the European Parlia¬ 
ment, which does not effect¬ 
ively control the Commission, 
let alone the Council of Minis¬ 
ters. The German Constitu¬ 
tional Own still holds itsdf to 
be superior to the European 
Court, in contrast to our 
House of Lords which accepts 
a subordinate role; the Ger¬ 
man oourt has expressed its 
concern that constitutional de¬ 
velopments in Europe could 
come into conflict with the 
requirement 
of the Ger¬ 
man basic 
law that Ger¬ 
many should 
be a demo¬ 
cratic state. 

That is one 
advantage of 
a written con¬ 
stitution; in Britain our demo¬ 
cracy can be eroded without 
effective appeal to the courts. 

Now the Danish Supreme 
Court has joined the German 
Constitutional Court in hold¬ 
ing that the question of wheth¬ 
er the Maastricht Treaty vio¬ 
lates the national constitution 
is one that the Danish courts 
can consider. In 1994 a lower 
court refused to allow the case 
to be heard, but the Supreme 
Court has overruled them on 
appeal. Democracy is also a 
central issue in the public 
debate over the single curren¬ 
cy. Obviously the single cur¬ 
rency represents in itself a 
transfer of power from the 
national parliaments to the 
putative European Central 
Bank, which will be governed 
by nominated and unaccount¬ 
able officials. 

At present, national govern¬ 
ments still have the power to 
determine monetary and ex¬ 
change policy, except in so for 
as they or their national 
constitutions have handed that 


function over to an indepen¬ 
dent national central bank. In 
the case of Germany, the 
independence of the Bundes¬ 
bank is guaranteed by the 
constitution and could be re¬ 
moved only if the constitution 
were changed- Under the sin¬ 
gle currency, European inter¬ 
est and exchange rates would 
cease to be under any deano- 
cratic influence at all. The 
creation of an independent Eu¬ 
ropean Central Bank implies 
that the individual democ¬ 
racies cannot be trusted with 
the value of money, but that 
unelected officials can be. 

Repeated experience shows 
that monetary and budget 
policies only work when they 
work together- In post-war 
British financial history, there 
have been times when these 
policies were at variance with 
each other. In 
each case the 
looser policy 
undermined 
the tighter 
one. Yet if the 
European 
Central 
Bank’s con¬ 
trol of the sin¬ 
gle currency has to be support- 
ed by control over national 
budgets, that would mean the 
whole of economic policy 
would have to be transferred 
to the Bank. As public expen¬ 
diture decisions underlie every 
other type of political decision 
— including welfare, social 
services, defence .and foreign 
policy—such a transfer would 
leave European democracy 
with hardly any power at all. 

In tiie August issue of the 
Gerrard 8 National Econom¬ 
ic Review, Professor Tim 
Congdon lays down what he 
regards as the essential condi¬ 
tions for the success of a single 
curraicy. 

The EU can have a single 
currency if (I) it is p repare d to 
make the changeover from a 
multiplicity of national legal 
lenders to a single European¬ 
wide legal tender on a single 
day with (nearly) all prices and 
contracts redenominated im¬ 
mediately. and ail redenomin¬ 
ations complete within a few 
weeks; (2) all monetary policy 
levers are concentrated in the 



Rees~Mogg 



Central Bank, which is the sole 
issuer of the new legal tender 
(3) the nations of the EC sur¬ 
render ultimate control of tax¬ 
ation and government expendi¬ 
ture to a new central govern¬ 
ment which has fiscal sover¬ 
eignty over all of them; and (4) 
this new central government 
has the power and the re¬ 
sources — with expenditure 
probably running into many 
billions of Ecus/Eutos — to 
compensate the private sector 
for losses from contractual up¬ 
heaval and the casts of carry¬ 
ing out the currency 
changeover. 

None of these propositions 
is non-con traversal, though I 
find Professor Congdon "s ar¬ 
guments for them very persua¬ 
sive. If he is right, the choice 
before Europe is not whether 
to have a single currency, but 
whether to have a single 
government. Beyond that, 
there is the question of how to 
establish a democratic basis 
for such a single government 
Why does Professor Cong¬ 
don think that you cannot 
separate a single government 
from a single currency? He 
argues that there is, in fact. 


"no example in history of 
significant sovereign states 
sharing a single currency’” He 
puts this down to what econo¬ 
mists call “free rider" prob¬ 
lems. Budget deficits and 
short-term financing would 
both put inflationary pres¬ 
sures on the European single 
currency. “The larger the bud¬ 
get deficit, tiie higher the 
proportion [the national gov¬ 
ernments) can capture for the 
benefit of their own citizens 
without paying for it by tax¬ 
ation." he writes. “The higher 
the proportion of short-term 
monetary financing of the 
budget deficit the cheaper the 
cost of debt service to 
governments." 

I f there is one currency, 
but 15 governments, each 
of these governments 
will have a “free rider" 
temptation to adopt budget 
and financing policies which 
undermine tire currency. Most 
German commentators have 
already seen this danger com¬ 
ing. partly because the Ger¬ 
man taxpayer would have to 
pay most of the cost Whether 


Germans. like Chancellor 
Kohl, want a federal union of 
Europe, or, like the Bundes¬ 
bank. fear it they all recognise 
the truth of this Congdon 
argument A currency union 
will only work if there is 
political union, because mone¬ 
tary and fiscal polity are not 
divisible. 

There seem to be four pos¬ 
sible solutions. The first 
which has most support in 
Britain, is to accept the curren¬ 
cy equivalent of the Reform¬ 
ation doctrine of cuius regio, 
cuius reltgio — one sovereign¬ 
ty, one religion. As there are 15 
sovereignties, there should be 
15 currencies, or 14 if you count 
the formally linked currencies 
of Belgium and Luxembourg 
as one. Probably the British 
will stick by this view, at least 
for the next few years. 

The second choice is a single 
currency, but one that is 
initially confined to a small 
number of dosely linked gov¬ 
ernments, presumably indud- 
ing Germany, France, the 
Netherlands, Belgium. Lux¬ 
embourg and perhaps Aus¬ 
tria. Under German leader¬ 


ship, this inner core might for 
some years steam in convoy, 
with governments solving the 
“one currency, several govern¬ 
ments" problem by behaving 
as though they were one 
government although they 
were not Eventually, this 
might wdJ break down; it 
would be under pressure from 
the beginning, but it is not 
inconceivable as a temporary 
solution. It would not be 
democratic, as the real influ¬ 
ence on economic policy would 
be the bureaucracies of the 
Commission, the Bank and 
the core governments. 

The third choice is Euro¬ 
pean democracy on the parlia¬ 
mentary model, making jfc 
frank transfer of power from' 
national parliaments to the 
European Parliament and cre¬ 
ating a European government 
dependent on a parliamentary 
majority. The Commission 
would then become the civil 
service of this government and 
ministers, supported by a par¬ 
liamentary majority, would 
replace the present Commis¬ 
sioners. The Council of Minis¬ 
ters might be transformed into 
some sort of Senate, but would 
lose its main powers. 

The fourth choice would be 
to adopt the American raodd 
and directly elect the President 
of Europe, who would take 
over many of the powers of the 
Council of Ministers. He 
would dominate, or actually 
appoint, the Commission and 
would face the European Par¬ 
liament and Court as a sepa¬ 
rate executive authority. These 
third and fourth choices would 
certainly require a new Euro¬ 
pean Treaty, would be subjeg 
to referenduras in many cou£ 
tries, presumably including 
Britain, and would be chal¬ 
lenged in the courts, above all 
in Germany and Denmark. 

The two democratic choices 
might or might not be good for 
tiie p eople of Europe. They 
certainly go far beyond pre¬ 
sent state of public opinion in 
most European countries. 

The probability is that the 
democratic deficit of the Euro¬ 
pean Union will not be tack¬ 
led, but that the single cur¬ 
rency will be attempted by a 
small group of countries. That 
will make the shortfall of Eu¬ 
ropean democracy more obvi¬ 
ous and more damaging. The 
trouble with Europe is that 
the people do not trust the 
bureaucrats, and the bur¬ 
eaucrats certainly do not 
trust the people. 


Stop 

LORD'S cricket ground is to dose 
its traditional print shop beneath 
the Grand Stand where scorecards 
have been produced using hand-set 
type for TO years, despite protests 
from MCC members. 

The first scorecard was printed 
at Lord's in 1848 from a tent and the 
present room was opened in 1926. 
But MCC has derided that, as part 
of tiie redevelopment of the Grand 



"Apparently they're dead 
easy to pass, failing them is 
far harder” 


press 

Stand at the end of the season, its 
ancient Letterpress will now be 
replaced by a desktop publishing 
arrangement.' 

Master printer Vince Miller, 
who as the longest-serving employ¬ 
ee at Lord's set in type the names of 
Cowdrey, Lake. May and Wardle 
in the 1950s, will retire at the end of 
the season along with his small 
team of assistants. 

“ft’s very sad. The members have 
been up in arms,” remarked Lieu¬ 
tenant-Colonel John Stephenson, 
who retired as secretary of MCC in 
1993. "The old press is part of 
Lord’s. I know one has to move 
with the times, but you have to 
think of tradition and that is what 
makes Lord's unique." 

In a carefully-worded circular, 
seen by supporters of die print shop 
as a distinct no-ball, the MCC told 
members that its committee has 
derided "that a printing depart¬ 
ment will continue at Lord’s pro¬ 
ducing a regularly updated 
scorecard. The Lette r p r ess will also 
be retained." The circular fails to 
explain that the printing will be 
computerised and the Letterpress is 
destined to become an exhibit in the 
Lord's museum. 



• This years pilgrimage to 
Lourdes cannot have been the 
happiest for Frances Shand Kydd. 
colourful mother to the Princess of 
Wales. Her journey took her past 
an endless succession of posters 
promoting a French magazine. It 
promised lurid new revelations 
about her daughter's private life. 


Rogue mail 

LABOUR backbenchers are per¬ 
haps preparing too assiduously for 
a Tony Blair government Paul 
flynn, the trenchant MP for New¬ 
port W who wants cannabis 
legalised and the monarchy abol¬ 
ished, has mailed 250 colleagues 
with his suggestion of a 1996 com¬ 
mittee of backbenchers along tiie 
lines of tiie Tories’ 1922 Committee. 

Apparently covering all eventu¬ 


alities, he also sent rate to Don Fos¬ 
ter, Liberal Democrat MP for Bath. 
"I can’t bear it Ira terrible," he gra¬ 
ded. "I got the wrong Foster. It 
should have gone to Derek Foster, 
not Don. But one howler out of 250 
isn’t bad I suppose. Chris Patten 
once sent me a letter asking for 
money for the Conservative Party. 

“The new committee may look 
like another Labour split but it real¬ 
ly isn’t about that." 


County down 

THOMAS HARDYS Dorset is try¬ 
ing bitterly to repair its rustic im¬ 
age after being rejected as “too 
twee" by film-makers producing 
Jude based on his novel Jude The 
Obscure, which stars Kate Winslet 
The British director. Michael 
Win ter bottom, has chosen New 
Zealand and the Yorkshire Dales 
as its setting. 

Too many poweriines, dual car¬ 
riageways and television aerials 
and an absence of scope for "big 
shots" forced the film-makers to 
abandon hope of true Hardy coun¬ 
try. “Dorset is not twee, it is rustic, 
and though we do have dual car¬ 
riageways we don’t have a motor¬ 
way," bleats the tourism officer. 


• Barry Field, the bungee-jumping 
MP for the Isle of Wight — no 



shrinking violet when it comes to 
publicity — is receiving medical 
treatment for a strain in his arm 
which he suggests has been 
brought on by shaking hands with 
too many constituents. 


Duelling dons 

THE distinguished historian Lord 
Dacre has used a book review to 
take a gratuitous swipe at his old 
enemy and fellow academic at 
Peterhouse, Cambridge. Maurice 
Cowling. 

Dacre, or Hugh Trevor-Roper, 



Kate Winslet a Hardy star 



was Master of Peterhouse when 
Cowling, guru to Michael Portillo, 
historian of modem England and 
the college's most powerful don at 
tiie tune, took against him for his 
whiggish outlook. 

The feud has run for many years 
and the latest dig comes in Da era’s 
critique of Lady Antonia Fraser's 
The Gunpowder Plot in The Liter¬ 
ary Review. Guy Fawkes, notes the 
naughty peer, had a Jesuit cousin, 
one Cbwhng. no doubt a sinister 
fellow". Cowling was not answer¬ 
ing calls yesterday, doubtless pre¬ 
paring an add retort Dacre simply 
said: “What an interesting coinri- 
dence you have spotted." 


Ex-parrot 

A KEEN shot the Duke of ’ 
minster but by his own admi 
in next month’s Field magazi 
trigger-happy peer. Recallin 
“extraordinary right-and-left 
one shoot he says fie brought» 
a parrot 

"It was dusk, and a magpie 
out of some gorse bushes. I s, 
and then its mate flew out 
When my dog retrieved thei 
my horror I saw this multicolc 
bird... It must have beet 
escapee." 

The ducal trauma appeal 
have been shortlived for he we 


V" 1 ' •' 




D e - A low woodcock came to- 
waros me over the lake. I hit it with 
tnfi first barrel and just as I did so I 
rf w a . s “ mon rising below tiie sur- 
* a " water, so I shot at it and 
a dog bowled past me and grabbed 

“by the end of the tail." 


P-H-S 

l 









1 B^ncie * 


-■r.e 




THE TIMES THURsn.v 


AUGUST 15 1996 



17 


PRIEST IN THE CITY 

A death that demands engagement not retreat 


The violent death of Fathpr ru • 

Gray has robbed Liverpool of a 
priest and the Church ofEnaJj f d f ed ! caled 
leader. As with the murdef of die linH re 


deprived has died at the hands nr rh l ° ^ ^ hen the ? reat M 
sought to save. Although it would he DoIIl,lg died - after 
despair. Father Gray? ^"5* 10 P°° r Portsmou 


that, “everyone is a blood 
relative of Chnsr the King". 

That inspiration succeeded in drawing 

Ric^ an r S f those me Anglo-Catholic 
Frank Weston called the “ragged, 
naked, oppressed and sweated" to Christ 
Dir” S’ Priest Father 


V -— IM p . MM 

a lifetime dedicated to the 


despair. Father Gray’s own examnle^n. E°° r JJ ortsr71 outh, some 20,000 parish- 
courages • a hope that the best P ners followed his cortege. The congrega¬ 
nt^ is not retreat but engapemen, tian , W H5 attracted as much by faith as 

The irKnimtlnn .u„ . . . , . *■ Works. The nmato rIt..il 


imseip- is not rerreat but engV&wn. 

that took Father Gray 

Liverpool was ttte A^gllutholic^radifon 


works. The ornate ritual of a church which 
treated even the lowliest as “prophets, 
pnests and kings" recognised that religion 
need not be celebrated in an exclusively 
cerebral way. Anglo-Calholicism sought to 

eorirAl _1 _ . J • •. it " . .. 


trained for the priesthood at fhprv.n^ 1 ^ 1 * “^raj wa X Anglo-Catholirism sought to 
tlie Resurrection, founded bv a sansfy physical, and spiritual, hunger and it 

thal had moved from Oxford to ir J i 8 aIin B unpromising lands 

uxiord to Leeds while the Sea of Faith elsewhere withdrew. 


spedficaUy to take the Church to the &S? 
cities. Their actions were driven by their 

S^n?H y ^ ngl,>Calh0l i CiSm grw ™ ^ 

Oxford Movement of the 1830s. which 
sought to rescue Anglicanism from the 
complacency into which it had sunk in the 
iSth century The leaders of die movement. 
Newman, Pusey and Keble wished to 
reacquaint a worldly Church with its 
spiritual roots. 

Their teaching, partiailarly that of Pusey, 
affirmed the real presence of Christ in the 
hudianst. The belief in the Incarnation, the 
truth of Christ made Man and present in 
bread and wine, imbued Anglo-Catholic 
pnests with a special concern for the 
physical as well as the spiritual well-being of 
their flock. That prompted a desire to bring 
Christ to the people neglected by an 
Anglicanism retreating to middle-class ghet- 
toes. Pnests were inspired, in the words of 
the Magdalen missioner Father Basil Jelli- 


lo our age. where fewer brilliant minds 
feel called to the Church and few of Ihem to 
work in parishes such as Christopher 
Gray’s, his vocation was exceptional. His 
death will cause some to question the 
wisdom of a mind so elevated and a man so 
monastic working in conditions .so difficult. 
But Father Gray was in a proud tradition, 
and a far from forlorn one. 

Writing in 1993 of what priesthood meant 
he invoked the example of Jesus washing his 
disciples’ feet on the eve of his Passion and 
the idea of “humble labour for others, in 
obedience to the Father, and to the point of 
sacrificing one’s own life”. Father Gray 
sacrificed his life engaged in the humblest of 
labour but to the greatest of ends — the 
salvation of those most desperately in need. 
His sacrifice should inspire his countrymen, 
as he was inspired by the priests who went 
before him, never to turn in despair from 
those who reject what is right. 


DOLE’S DREAM TEAM 


Reasons to annoint Colin Powell in San Diego 


Colin Powell gave a moving and important 
r’yech at the Republican National Conven¬ 
tion on Monday. Since then Bob Dole has 
been sorely tempted to exploit the emotion 
and attention generated by that perfor¬ 
mance, break with precedent and offer him 
the post of Secretary of State. If he could be 
sure of success, it would be a skilful move in 
a so far skilful convention for the Repub¬ 
licans. He could, with profit extend the idea 
to other choices for his Cabinet 

Any such process is subject to a peculiar 
legal complication: under American law a 
candidate may not name anyone to a post 
before his election. But the candidate is 
allowed to indicate that someone is their first 
choice for a job and he or she may then say 
whether or not they would accept the task if 
asked. The Republican nominee has fre¬ 
quently said that he admires the General 
and would like to see him in a Dole 
administration. General Powell returned the 
compliment on Monday by emphasising the 
degree that they had worked together in the 
past. There are some precedents. When 
Eisenhower pencilled in John Foster Dulles 
as Secretary of State in 1952 and George 
Bush chose James Baker in 198S, the selec- 
ifais were obvious in advance of the results. 

The issue is not whether Mr Dole can give 
his blessing to General Powell but whether it 
is in his interests to do so. The move could 
smack of political desperation, appearing 
solely motivated by die General’s huge 
popularity. But these risks could be out¬ 
weighed by the quite convincing arguments 
in favour. The first is that Mr Dole prides 
himself on being a plain-spoken man. If he 
has already derided that General Powell 


would be the best man for this role, he could 
boost his image of derisiveness by saying so. 

The second is that whatever reservations 
Europeans may have about General Pow¬ 
ell’s extreme caution in foreign policy, he is 
well qualified to reinforce the Dole cam¬ 
paign’s promise to restore competence and 
professionalism to the White House. It 
would reassure allies who may have been 
made nervous by Pat Buchanan’S message 
of isolationism and protectionism during the 
Republican primary season. 

Mr Dole has no reason to be the prisoner 
of precedence. Indeed given the appearance 
of a “New Dole” this month, with his 
uncharacteristically bold economic plan and 
his selection, in Jack Kemp, of an unexpected 
vice-presidential candidate, a further 
innovation would help to maintain the 
momentum of a previously dull campaign. 

Of course Mr Dole is attracted by General 
Powell’s popularity amongst voters. But 
there is a wider interest at stake. American 
government is not a one-man show. The 
quality of the American executive goes far 
beyond the presidency. It matters enor¬ 
mously who staffs an administration. In 
1992 Bill Clinton ran on a centrist message 
but used racial, gender, and sexual orienta¬ 
tion guidelines in constructing his team. He 
then manned the White House with Arkan¬ 
sas intimates and campaign aides many of 
whom were in their twenties. If this had 
been known in advance, Americans might 
have had second thoughts. One of the best 
reasons for a Dole presidency is the exper¬ 
ience and competence of the people he would 
bring with him. He could gain further 
ground by reinforcing this message now. 


FARFLUNG PHOENICIANS 


Merchants with a neglected claim on our imagination 


\ 

, ■» •' " t 


The Phoenicians were not only the most 
famous seafarers of ancient times; they also 
gave us our alphabet. They were not only 
once the Mediterranean’s richest trading 
nation; they also gave us one of literatures 
greatest heroines. They and their offspring 
were dominant in southern Europe for a 
thousand years. But for all their efforts, and 
far all the admiration bestowed upon Queen 
Dido by poets and artists, they left little that 

is admired by posterity. 

As our Madrid correspondent describes 
today, the Spanish have now uncovered a 
large Phoenician city at Cerro del Villar, 
near- Malaga. It suggests a different story 
from the usual tales of passing barbarian 
traders. The site has straight streets, plazas 
and ample villas. It points to a sophisticated 
city life of which little had been imagined 
before. Maybe Cerro del Villar will bring 
new visitors and attract new attention to the 
Phoenicians. It would not be before time. 

Sometimes a people can get on ^ 
side of history and never 
nirians were Semitic people mocked by the 
Greeks for their greed. Their Carthaginian 

colony, founded by Dido in 

Virgil* Aeneid. became the object ofnvalry 

anrihatredamong lhe “TfiEKSSl* 
after the (right that Hannibal 

ssassaMgS 

WOr !f S ■VhTaU a &causc the Phoenicians 

pagans. *eir ^ u,ati ™ 


Levantine merchants have outlasted Phoe¬ 
nician Tyre and Sidon by centuries. 

The Phoenicians still keep many of their 
secrets. It is known, for example, that with 
its rich silver deposits and shells yielding the 
coveted Tyrian purple dye. Spain contrib¬ 
uted heavily to the Phoenicians’ fabled 
wealth- But "scant physical evidence of their 
presence survives, and it was commonly 
assumed that with the exception of Gedir, 
the Phoenician forerunner cif Cadiz, they 
had built little more than trading posts 
there Perhaps there will now come fresh 
curiosity about a civilisation which was 
already so skilled by the 10th century BC 
that it was contracted to build the Temple of 
Solomon, a civil,sat,nr to whose d^- 
elopment of rhe North Semitic alphabet 
adopied by the Greeks, we owe the origins of 
our own written language. 

Merchants they were, the middlemen of 
history- but they were purveyors not merely 
of the spices of India, but of the spice of 
adventure. These were the fearless navi- 
oators who. when others were still hugging 
coastlines, first discovered and used the Pole 
Star, and who guarded the secrets of their 
trade routes, knowledge of currents and 
winds and discoveries as zealously as 
Renaissance Venetians were to keep the 
secrets of their glass factories. They framed 
the first known maritime laws and their 
great ships were the East indiamen of the 
ancient world, credited by Herodotus with 
the first circumnavigation of Africa. Their 
borders, as Ezekiel wrote of TyTfc. were 
figuratively as well as literally “in the midst 
of the seas". To a still greater extent than the 
Vikings, Dutch or Portuguese after them, 
they left little mark on land. Their claim is 
on the imagination. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Human life and 
modem medicine 

From Sir Anthony Alment 


Yours faithfully. 

ANTHONY ALMENT (President, 
Royal College of Obstetricians 
and Gynaecologists. I97S-S1). 
Winston House. 

Bough ton. Northampton. 

August 14. 


From Mrs Sara Starkey 


Sir. Once again we have headlines 
over another miracle/horror or sci¬ 
ence. And so far it has been easiest to 
blame the woman herself. GPs or the 
media. 

We. the public, are inconsistent in 
our attitudes. On the one hand we are 
horrified by the unnaturalness of 
modem medicine while, at the same 
lime, putting vast sums into research 
charity coffers and. through our taxes, 
into universities and teaching hospi¬ 
tals. These funds go towards ever 
more esoteric research into all 
brandies of medical science, includ¬ 
ing genetics and experiments design¬ 
ed to give every infertile woman die 
opportunity to have a child. 

Apart from the fact most of these 
women won’t conceive after many tox¬ 
ic and suspect procedures, those who 
do eventually give birth have a far 
higher chance of producing children 
with problems, from slow learning to 
quite horrendous illnesses. 

By sad contrast we have made little 
headway in overall health: indeed, ac¬ 
cording to the latest Government data 
(Living in Britain . General House¬ 
hold Survey 1994 . HMSO, 1996) in 
every age group, particularly the 
young, the incidence of longstanding 
illnesses is rising. Perhaps the latest 
horror stories on what medicine is 
now capable of doing will act as a 
catalyst to rethinking whether this 
radical roller-coaster interventionist 
medicine is the panacea to all our ills. 


Yours sincerely. 

SARA STARKEY. 

12a Ashbumham Road. 
Tonbridge, KenL 
August 13. 


From rhe Reverend J. E. Abberton 


Sir. I believe that Lord Habgood’s 
moral reasoning is wrong. You simply 
cannot, logically, argue for any hu¬ 
man rights at any stage unless there is 
first ofall a right to reach that stage. 
You cannot abandon the rights of the 
embryo and then hope to rediscover 
human rights later on. 

The word “viable" means able to 
live without the protection of the 
womb (did I say “protection"?): but no 
one in society can live alone — we all 
depend on each other, and newly bom 
babies certainly rely on their mothers 
(or on some other source of nourish¬ 
ment and care). 

It is understandable that many will 
not wish to use the word "person” in 
regard to the human embryo: but it is 
undoubtedly human life and. if allow¬ 
ed to develop as either nature or God 
intends, it will become a person. 


Yours faithfully. 

J. E. ABBERTON. 

St Peter's Presbytery. 

651 Leeds Road. 

Bradford, West Yorkshire. 
August 7. 


From Mr Andrew E. A. Selous 


Sir. Is it not time that the law allowed 
GPs to prescribe fertility treatment 
only to married women with their 
husband's consent where the couple 
can support children? Hie commit¬ 
ment of marriage is the best place for 
a child, lei alone several children bom 
at the same time. 

Furthermore, why should the pub¬ 
lic fund treatment through their taxes 
that can lead to considerable oast to 
the public purse when the parents 
concerned are unable to support the 
children? 


Yours faithfully, 

ANDREW E. A. SELOUS 
(Conservative prosjiecMve 
parliamentary candidate for 
Sunderland North), 

52 Kyrfe Road, SWII. 
August 13. 


From Mr Rodnev Parkins 


Sir. You quote Miss Mandy Allwood 
as saving of her eight-baby pregnan¬ 
cy: "1 want nature to take its course" 
(report. August 12). What a pity dial 
she did not do so before accepting in¬ 
fertility Treatment. 


Yours faithfully. 

RODNEY PARKINS. 

S Duval Drive. Rochester. Kent. 
August 13. 


Letters to the Editor should cany a 
daytime telephone number. They 
may be sent to a fax number — 
0171-7825046. 


] Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone 0171-782 5000 


Whittle and the vision for invention 


From Dr William Kingston 


Sir, It seems to me. in the light of re¬ 
cent events — the abortion of a twin, 
rhe destruction of frozen embryos, die 
possible birth nf octuplrts as the result 
of fertility treatment—that the branch 
of medicine I once practised is sliding 
away from its belief in unique human 
identity and dignity towards the expe- 
dleni management of generic material 
(letters. August 7. JO). 

Though a so-called liberal gynaecol¬ 
ogist who performed many abortions 
in my own career. I would strongly 
endorse liic views expressed by Lord 
Habgood (letter. August 7). 1 would 
also suggest that die Human Fertilisa¬ 
tion and Embryology Authorin’ has 
allowed itself to drift, in having failed 
to prevent the careless neglect of pro¬ 
per record-keeping or to accept res- 
VXjnsibttity for excess embryos whose 
fate has caused such sadness. 


Sir, Your obituary of Sir Frank Whit¬ 
tle today notes that he debated wheth¬ 
er he could afford the £5 to renew the 
patent for the Jut engine, first filed at 
the Patent Office in 1930. 

It was in fact worse than ihis. I re¬ 
ceived a letter from him in 1969 in 
which he said: "I allowed the master 
patent to lapse in 1935 because it then 
seemed unlikely that the invention 
would reach a commercial stage with¬ 
in the life of the patent; moreover. I 
could ill afford the renewal fees." He 
goes on to point out chat his first finan¬ 
cial backers. Falk and Partners, never 
received a dividend and were even 
farad to sell their shares at par (al¬ 
lowing for inflation) in 1944. by Sir 
Sraffurd Cripps, then the Minister for 
Aircraft Production. 


temal combustion. Parsons replied 
that not only could he nor do it, but 
that the task was intrinsically impos¬ 
sible. Ir was just this that Whittle 
achieved in 1930. 


Yours faithfully, 

WILLIAM KINGSTON. 
University of Dublin. 
School of Business Studies. 
Trinity College, Dublin 2. 
August 10. 


One might be allowed to speculate 
that, if Whittle had received full indus¬ 


trial and government support from 
the start, jet propulsion might have 
been as powerful a deterrent in the 
cause of peace as the atomic bomb 
was in the postwar period. 

But Whinle was no salesman, and 
did not know his way around politics 
and bureaucracies as well as Watson- 
Watt did in the cause of radar. So the 
money (£.4 million — a prodigious 
amount for research in the 1930s) 
went into the essentially defensive ra¬ 
dar instead. 

Another interesting twist to this 
story of failure to back innovation is 
that when Admiral "Jackie" Fisher 
was relegated to the Board of Inven¬ 
tion in the First World War, he sent 
for Sir Charles Parsons, the inventor 
of the steam turbine, to try to get him 
to marry the turbine principle with in- 


Yours sincerely. 

GEORGE SMITH 
(Professor of Materials Science). 
Trinity College. Oxford. 

August 10. 


Postal dispute 

From MrS.J. Casely 


From the Managing Director 
of Royal Mall 


Sir. It is not the totality of services that 
Royal Mail offer that is the centre of 
this dispute (Mr Robin Rhoderick- 
Jones’s letter. August 12). but rather 
the increasingly absurd methods that 
Royal Mail wish to introduce to in¬ 
crease profit 

The recent rise in postal charges 
was brought about by increasing gov¬ 
ernment demands for revenue (an¬ 
other form of indirect taxation) and 
not by the business failing to deliver 
productivity or profit targets. 

The union's point is that they have 
given Royal Mail a level of productiv¬ 
ity and quality- of service unheralded 
in any comparable postal administra¬ 
tion, and now wish rightly to share in 
the benefits. By any standard the pos¬ 
tal workers do an outstanding job For 
wages and conditions that few would 
wish to accept. A five-day week is not 
unreasonable for those who start the 
working day at 5am. 


Sir, All the opinion we have from cus¬ 
tomers is that, far from regarding a 
postal delivery- every day as a “luxury" 
(letter, August 12). they value it as an 
essentia] service which they want to 
see maintained. Most of the country's 
26 million addresses receive two deliv¬ 
eries a day. and many customers tell 
us they want both to continue. 

RoyaJ Mail aims to complete the 
first delivery to the vast majority of ad¬ 
dresses by 9_30am (letter. August 13). 
The agreement recently arrived at 
with die Communication Workers 
Union negotiators through Acas is 
specifically designed to help us 
achieve that nationwide. This would 
give the biggest boost to pay and con¬ 
ditions for postmen and women in re¬ 
cent history and pave the way for even 
better service for our customers. 

The union's executive should follow 
the example of London Underground 
unions and ballot their members. 


Yours etc. 

S. J. CASELY. 

Flat 24. Merlin House. 

Central Avenue, Chatham, KenL 
August 12. 


Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD DYKES. 

Managing Director. 

Royal Mail, 

Headquarters, 148 Old Street ECL 
August 13. 


Abolition of duty-free 


From Mr Steven Burgess 


Sir, George Brock is quite right to 
question the logic of maintaining 
duty-free ("This week in Europe". 
August 12). Its abolition wirhin the sin¬ 
gle market makes sense and will not 
necessarily mark the end of a great 
tradition: for as long as we have a 
higher domestic duty on such pro¬ 
ducts as beer, wine and spirits, we will 
continue to travel to the Continent for 
cheaper alcoholic drinks. 

Bul as a result of abolishing duty¬ 
free. the forces of competition and con¬ 
sumer choice within the single market 
will, in the longer term, bring extra 
pressure to bear on the Chancellor to 
reduce the level of duty in this coun¬ 
try. Such a development would surely 
be a good thing for the individual con¬ 
sumer and taxpayer and would 
enable the alcoholic drinks industry 
here to compete on a more level foot¬ 
ing with our EU partners. 


Yours sincerely, 

S. T. BURGESS, 

Top Flat 34 Dymock Street, SW6. 
August 12. 


to release them from the need to carry 
"unnecessary duty-free alcohol in 
passenger jets". 

Duty-free sales on aircraft (and at 
airports) not only provide customers 
with a quality service, but are a major 
source of income which helps keep 
ticket prices down. If duty-free shop¬ 
ping within the EU does end in 1999, 
Britannia Airways estimates that holi¬ 
day prices will increase by around £15 
per passenger. 

Mr Brock also suggests that the in¬ 
come derived from duty and tax-free 
provides airports with a government 
subsidy: but duty-free is only a subsi¬ 
dy if there is an actual loss to the UK 
exchequer. 

The Duty Free Confederation has 
strong reason to believe, and is cur¬ 
rently undertaking research Jo prove, 
that there is in fact no less to the exche¬ 
quer from duty and tax-free sales. In 
fact, the converse is true — duty-free 
actually generates additional exche¬ 
quer revenue and valuable employ¬ 
ment. Contrary to some opinion, duty¬ 
free sales will not, in the main, be re¬ 
placed by tax-paid sales, to the detri¬ 
ment of producers such as the Scotch 
whisky industry. 


From Mr Robert G. Parker-Eaton 


Sir. As the executive committee repre¬ 
sentative for all UK airlines on the 
Duty Free Confederation. I can assure 
George Brock that airlines have not 
been "begging government for years" 


Yours sincerely, 

ROBERT PARKER-EATON 
(Deputy Managing Director). 
Britannia Airways Ltd, 

Britannia House. 

London Luton Airport Bedfordshire. 
August 13. 


Content of alcohol 


From Dr Julia Ellis 


Britten statue 

From Mrs A. M. Riley 


Sir, Rosie Boycott’s contribution to 
your feature on addiction yesterday, 
"Why some people can! stop at a few 
drinks and a flutter", horrified me. 
She states that: “Alcohol itself is 
ether " I can assure her that it most 
certainly is not. Ethyl alcohol is found 
in alcoholic beverages and, in reason¬ 
able quantities, creates the harmless 
high that she discusses. 

Ether is a volatile substance that va¬ 
porises readily at room remperature 
and in this state is highly explosive. It 
is also a powerful and unpleasant 
anaesthetic. Members of the public 
should not confuse the two, and must 
not attempt to smell, taste or handle 
ether in any way. 


Sir, “Britten is probably the greatest 
composer this country has ever pro¬ 
duced.” What a depressing thought! 

Mr Peier Shaffer (letter, August 9) 
might like to listen to Elgar. 

Yours sincerely, 

A. M. RILEY, 

High Post, Parsons Lane. 

Crockerton, Warminster. Wiltshire. ■ 


From Mr Graham Wheeler 


Yours faithfully. 

JULIA ELLIS 

(Nutritionist. Coeliac Research Unit). 
St Thomas’ Hospital, 

Lambeth Ifalace Road, SE1. 

August 13. 


Sir, Perhaps the statue should be in 
London. After all, Britten is a national 
figure. Aldeburgh can hardly object — 
they have had tiieir say. What about 
the foyer of the new Sadlers Wells 
theatre (report and photograph. Au¬ 
gust 13) — the site where Peter Grimes 
was first given? 

Yours faithfully, 

GRAHAM WHEELER, 

67 Eastbury Rood, 

Northwood, Middlesex. 

August 13. 


Cast-iron design 
for a phone box 


From Mr Bruce Mania , FRJBA 


From Professor G. D. W. Smith. FRS 

Sir. Your obituary for Sir Frank Whit¬ 
tle is an object lesson for all who are 
concerned with science policy in the 
United Kingdom. In my view, the 
saga of official neglect, failure to in¬ 
vest, and eventual handover of ideas 
to competitors, is still all too familiar. 

At present, the Government and the 
Research Councils are exerting pres¬ 
sure on scientists to move towards 
more applied, short-term research 
which will be wealth-creating. The im¬ 
plications of this policy are that we are 
not already duing work of this kind, 
and that the blame for Britain’s rela¬ 
tive failure in recent years ro compete 
with rhe rest of the world in high-tech¬ 
nology industry can be laid at the door 
of the scientific community'. 

The story of Frank Whinle shows 
there is little wrong with the quality, 
or the applicability, of our science. The 
problems lie downstream, with re¬ 
peated failures of courage, vision, and 
investmtytt by government, city and fi¬ 
nancial institutions, and industry'. 


Sir, Lord St John of Fawsley. Chair¬ 
man of the Royal Fine Art Commis¬ 
sion, asks for a competition for the de¬ 
sign of a new-- telephone kiosk of 
“really good contemporary design" 

(letter, August 13: see also leading arti¬ 
cle, August 14). 

Such a competition was held in 
1964. The KS was chosen by the Post 
Office and the Royal Fine Art 
Commission, and about 25,000 were 
made. 

It was a cast-iron red kiosk virtual¬ 
ly vandal-proof, could be easily as¬ 
sembled in 20 minutes, had seven 
panes of glass (instead of 72 in the tra¬ 
ditional Kb which Lord Sr John prais¬ 
es in his lenerl, was easy to clean, well 
ventilated, properly illuminated and 
was a good, clean design. Sadly, very 
few remain, haring been superceded 
by the current rash of irrational, ill-de¬ 
signed boxes. 

There is no need for another compe¬ 
tition: reinstate KS. It is now 30 years 
old — old enough, in fact, to be listed. 


Yours etc, 

BRUCE MARTIN 
(Designer of the KS kiosk), 
Bruce Martin Associates, 
The New Studio. 

Bury Green, Little Hadham, 
Ware. Hertfordshire. 

August 14. 


From Professor D. E. Newland 


Sir. The Chairman of the Royal Fine 
Art Commission wants to improve the 
design of telephone kiosks and sug¬ 
gests a national competition. 1 pro¬ 
pose that this competition should in¬ 
clude also tite design of telecommuni¬ 
cation masts. 

These skeletal structures serve an 
important and useful function but can 
be very intrusive, especially when 
sited in beautiful countryside. When 
there are two masts of similar height 
but different design standing close to¬ 
gether. the visual effect can be disas¬ 
trous. 

The objective of a competition 
should be to find the most pleasing 
aesthetic design, while seeking to min¬ 
imise the number of masts needed. 
Cannot une elegant mast cany the 
aerials for several operators? 

Lord St John says the traditional 
red telephone kiosk was designed 
with the help of the Royal Fine Art 
Commission. Rather than inviting BT 
and other telephone companies to 
hold their own design competition (as 
he suggests), cannot the RFAC take 
the lead in sponsoring a competition? 
I am sure that the relevant profession¬ 
al engineering institutions as well as 
rhe companies concerned would be 
willing to help administer this. 


Yours sincerely. 

DAVID NEWLAND. 

University of Cambridge, 
Department of Engineering, 
Trumpington Street. Cambridge. 
August 13. 


Heart of the Bruce 


From rhe Dean of 
Aberdeen and Orkney 


Sir, Ii is indeed good that the heart of 
Robert the Bruce should receive a pro¬ 
per burial (report, August 13). but is 
Melrose Abbey the right place for 
this? 

The Bruce himself changed his ex¬ 
pressed desire that his heart be buried 
at Melrose. Should not his dying wish 
that it be buried in Jerusalem now be 
respected? After his death in 1329 the 
attempt to take his embalmed heart to 
the Holy Land foundered in Spain, 
but the journey could yer be com¬ 
pleted. 

Now that Historic Scotland has be¬ 
gun excavations at Melrose to find the 
casket containing the heart and plans 
to rebury it “with a fitting ceremony", 
surely Saint Andrew’s Church in Jeru¬ 
salem. where a plaque set into the 
Door some sixty years ago commemo¬ 
rates King Robert’s dying wish, is the 
proper place. 


Yours faithfully, 

GERALD STRANRAER-MULL, 
The Rectory. Ellon, Aberdeenshire. 
Augusr 13. 


Irish famine ship 

From Mr F. G. Davis 


Sir. Would it not be an imaginative 
gesture of reconciliation for the Brit¬ 
ish Government to offer to match the 
Irish Government’s contribution to 
the cost of the replica of the famine 
ship, Jeanie Johnston , now building 
in County Kerry (report and photo¬ 
graph, August 10)? And an equally im¬ 
aginative gesture of forgiveness for 
the organising committee to accept it? 


Yours faithfully, 

FRANK DAVJS. 

Stonelea, South Newington. 
Banbury, Oxfordshire. 
August 10. 


Budget tip 

From Mrs Kathleen Read 


Sir. In view of the Ip increase on a 
first-dass postage stamp, do you think 
the Chancellor could manage a far¬ 
ther penny on the 25p per week exira 
allowance on the pensions of the over- 
eighties? Many of us can still write. 


Yours sincerely. 
KATHLEEN READ. 

2 Windmill Cottages. 
Hilltop BreadsalJ, Derby. 
August 14. 


^5 


w 




THE TIMES 


THURSDAY AUGUST 15J996 



COURT CIRCULAR 


ST JAMES’S PALACE 
August 14: The Prince of 
Wdes this morning arrived in 
Mijet, Croatia, far a day visit 
His Royal Highness, accom¬ 
panied by the Croatian Prime 
Minister (Dr Zlatko Matessa). 
this afternoon toured the Nat¬ 
ional Park, Mijet, which in¬ 


cluded a visit to the Island of 
St Mary’s and a tour of the 
Monastery. 

The Prince of Wales arrived 
at Royal Air Force Lyneham 
this evening. 

Lieutenant Commander 
John La very RN was in 
attendance. 


Birthdays today 


The Princess Royal celebrates 
her 46th birthday today. 

Lord Burnham, 65; Sir 
Charles Carter, former Vice- 
Chancellor. Lancaster Univer¬ 
sity, 77; Mr David Coleman, 
former president. Royal Phar¬ 
maceutical Society of Great 
Britain. 57; Mr Edmund Dell, 
former MP, 75; Dr Hans 
Feibusch, mural painter. 98; 
Mr James Flecker. Headmas¬ 
ter, Ardingly College, 57; 
Dame Wendy Hiller, actress, 
84; Miss Rita Hunter, sopra¬ 
no. 63; Lord Ingrow. 79; Mr 
Jack Lynch, former Prime 
Minister. Republic of Ireland, 
79; Mr Edward McMillan- 
Scott, MEP, 47; Sir Patrick 
Naime, Former Master, St 
Catherine's College, Oxford, 
75; Sir Kenneth Newman, 
former Commissioner of the 
Metropolitan Police. 70: Ma¬ 
jor-General Kenneth Perkins. 


European 

Engineers 

The following United Kingdom 
engineers haw been awarded rhe 
qualification European Engineer 
by the European Federation of 
National Engineering Associ¬ 
ations lFEAN I) entitling them to 
use the letters Eur Ing as a prefix to 
their names: 

AUroft M J. Anroniou M. Argent- 
Hall D. Barratr R, Bane J, 
Billington R. Bramley M. Bushby 
B. Budin T J. Chan A H C, Cheung 
C H. Cook A W, Carmack P, Dai J 
S. Daley M. Demetriou G. 
Downes M, Etherington J, 
Fairhursr A. Fox J. Gaunt M. 
Gigantesco G. Goodall P, Greaves 
E S. Hall F R. Harrison J. Hason J, 
Hayati B. Hislup K P. Hobbs J. 
Hudson T. Johnson P W, Joseph 
M. Keen D. Kerry P J. Laws J T. 
Lee Shim J M. Maclean E. 
M anion C. Marshall V G. 
Meadien S, Michaelides G. Mills 
G. Mukerji P. Murdoch G. Odgers 
M. Orris K, Pearson S. Pozzi M. 
Raja V H. Rikker N. Rilsan O. 
Roberts P. Roper M, Russell B M. 
Sagoo KT. Schembri C. Seminars 
P. Smith J, Smith G. Su H C. 
Thomson G. Tucker G, Wallon- 
Knighf M P. Wardrop S A 
Watkins I. Watson C. Watts D. 
Williams A Wilson P. Wilson 1. 
Wood D P. Wood A Woodhead T. 
Yusuf O. Zheng X. 


70: Mr Oscar Peterson, jazz 
pianist, 71; Mr Justice 
Popplewdi, 69; Professor Sir 
Leon Radzinowicz, criminolo¬ 
gist. 90; Lady Jean Rankin, 
former Woman of the Bed¬ 
chamber to Queen Elizabeth 
the Queen Mother, 91; Mr 
Martin Redmond, MP, 59; 
Professor Sir Michael Rutter. 
FRS. professor of child psychi¬ 
atry. London University, 63; 
Viscount Selby. 54; Air Vice- 
Marshal Sir John Severne, 
former Captain of Tlie 
Queen’s Flight, 71; Captain 
Richard Smyly, racehorse 
trainer, 43; Lord Steyn. 64; Sir 
Stephen Tumim, former Chief 
Inspector of Prisons for Eng¬ 
land and Wales, 66; the Hon 
William Waidegrave, Chief 
Secretary to the Treasuiy, 50; 
Sir Kenneth Warren, aeronau¬ 
tical engineer. 70; Air Marshal 
Sir William Wratten, 57. 


University news 

Queen’s University 
of Belfast 

Conferment of honorary title 
The title of Honorary Profes¬ 
sor in the School of Chemistry 
has been conferred on Dr Jane 
Helson of the Open Univer¬ 
sity. 

Appointment 

Professor Colin Cowan to the 
Royal Academy of Engineer¬ 
ing/Northern Telecom Re¬ 
search Chair of Telecommuni¬ 
cations Systems Engineering. 
A graduate of the University of 
Edinburgh, he was previously 
Professor of Signal Processing 
and Head of the Department 
of Electrical and Electronic 
Engineering at Loughborough 
University of Technology. 


Lieutenancy of 
Wiltshire 

Deputy lieutenants 
The following have been appointed 
Deputy Lieu tenants of Wiltshire: 
Mr Richard David Straaon. Gen¬ 
eral Sir John Finlay Wtilasey 
Wilsey. 


Anniversaries 


BIRTHS: Robert Blake, admi¬ 
ral. Bridgwater. Somerset, 
1599; Napoleon Bonaparte. 
Emperor of France, Ajaccio, 
Corsica. 1769: Sir Waller Scott, 
novelist and poet. Edinburgh. 
1771; Thomas de Quincy, writ¬ 
er, Manchester. 1785; James 
Keir Hardie. Chairman of the 
Independent Labour Party 
IS93-I900 and 1913-14, Lanark. 
1856; Samuel Coleridge-Tay- 
lor. composer, London. 1875; 
Ethel Barrymore, actress. 
Philadelphia, 1879; Sir Mon¬ 
tague Burton, multiple tailor. 
Sheffield, 1885: Thomas 
Mboya, statesman, Kenya, 
1930. 


DEATHS: Macbeth. King of 
Scotland 1040-57, killed. 
Lumphanan, Aberdeen, 1057: 
Paul Signac, painter, pioneer 
of Pointillism, Paris, 1935; 
Rene Magritte, surrealist 
painter. Brussels, 1967. 

The Tivoli Pleasure Gardens 
opened in Copenhagen, 1843. 
The Panama Canal was 
opened, 1914. 

The Marine Broadcasting Act 
came into force, outlawing 
pirate radio stations broad¬ 
casting within British territo¬ 
rial waters, 1967. 

The three-day Woodstock 
Music and Art Fair began in 
upstate New York, 1969. 



Children from the Yaa Asantewaa Carnival Group jump for joy in costumes depicting their theme for 1996 — Carib People—to celebrate the 
launch of the Lilt Notting Hill CamivaL This weekend there will be events at Olympia; the carnival weekend itself is on August 25 and 26 


The Sovereign’s Parade — RMA Sandhurst 


General Sir Jeremy Mackenzie repre¬ 
sented the Queen at The Sovereign’s 
Parade at the Royal Military Academy 
Sandhurst on August 9. 

The following have been granted 
commissions in the Regiments and 
Corps shown, having successfully com¬ 
pleted Commissioning Course No 953. 
The Sword of Honour was won by 
Junior Under Officer MJ.M. Clifton 
and The Queen's Medal was won by 
Officer Cadet J.M.H. Loden. 

A .G. Akxander-Cooper. RGR. Eton Coll¬ 
ege: B.M. Allen, R. Anglian. St Peter's 
HS Burnham-co-Crouch: CJ. Allen. RA 
Trinity School Croydon: M.C. Anfeime, 
RHG/D, Douai School; J.R.G. Asbee. RLC. 
Reading Blue Coal School; T. Avey, REME. 
Heathodd School; N.D. Baker, R Signals. 
Chatham House GS: RJ. Baxter. REME. The 
Coiswold School: GJ. Bayliss. Staffords, 
Whiteness HS. Herdbrd; K.D.N. Beaumont. 
RLC. Hedingham CS: LJ. Bedford. PWRR. 
Steyning GS; O.M. Bedford. RHG/D. Harrow 
School: R_N Bemhem-Parter, RA. Duke of 
York'S RMS; G. Bianconi. RA Si George'S 
College. Weybridge: L-AJ. Brennan. RHG/D. 
Araplefonh College: M.W. Brett. RA Replan 
School A Briggs. REME. Wdbeck College: 
P-D-F. Briggs-Wiban. QRH. Dulwich College; 
ANS. Brown. RE, Tonbridge School; K.G. 
Brown. AGC ISPS) RBey HS. Hull; OJ.H. 
Bryant WFR. Broms grave School RJJ. Bryce- 
Stafford. RS. George Watson College: PA 
Buck. R Signals. Duke of York's RMS; AJLS.D. 
Burke. RGJ. Winchester College; WJ\F. Bye, 
AGC ISPS), Friends' School Great Ayton. 

C.E. Caie, R Signals, St Ma rgaret'S School 
Edinburgh: AJ. Cameron. RTR. Leeds GS; H.C. 
Cameron. RLC Plum free School Zimbabwe: 
M.B. Canning. RRF. Warwick School; PJ. Carr, 
RDG. Eton College; Z.N. Catsaras, LG. 
Bradfieid College TJ. CavtvGihbs, RLC Perse 
School; J. Cay. WFR. Steyning GS: AG.N.C. 
Chamberlin. LD. Harrow School; 1 jCL Chance. 
R Anglian. Pa ssmor es School Harlow; A 
Diaries. AGC (ETS). Richard Hale School; 
MA Charles. RE. Bosun Spa CS, Wethertoy. 
N.D.B. Chari wood, R Anglian. St Coluniba’s 
Co l lege. St Albans; JA Chessman. RA 
Highgate School; R.L Darke. RLC Tapton 
School. Sheffield; MA Oaxton. KOBR. St 
Clave's School. Orpington: MJ.M. Clifton. 
RDG. Eton College; W.D. Cockrell AGC (PRO). 
Caludrai Castle CS. Coventry: CP. Coleman, 
Kings. Manchester GS; RAF. Coles. D and D. 
Malvern College; MJ. Collins. IG. Bristol GS; 
MJ. Comer. RLC St Mary's School. Belfast; 
NJ. Copperwaite, PARA Elizabeth College, 
Guernsey; M.D.S Corbett IG. Eton College; 
GJ.H. Cbrdle. Gren Gds. Sedbergh School; J.B. 
Cotton. KRH. Stamford School MA Courage; 
LD. Queen Elizabeth HS. Hexham; PJvtJ. 
Cowell DWR. The Royal Hospital School: AT_ 
Cox. HLDRS. Inverurie Academy. Aberdeen; 
F.G. Crichton. Int Corps. St Bartholomew's 
School; N.S. Croft. 9/12 L Sherborne School; 
CJ.B. Duty. RLC. St Leonard's Mayfield 
Convent; W.HJ. Davies. Scots Dg, Harrow 
School; A.K. Davis. RA St James' School Far 
Bays; P. De Rouffignac. RAMC Wdbeck 


College; R.P. Dening-Stnithenruui. RTR. 
Frarnlingham College: C. Derbyshire. RA 
Welbeck College; M A Dingle. R Anglian. City 
of Norwich School: ASJ. Douglas. KOSB. 
King’s School, Bruton; JJ.M. Driscoll. PWRR, 
Cowplaln School. Watcrioovillc J.G. Durrani. 
LI. Clifton College. 


M J.G. Elliot-Squaie. Gren Gds. Har¬ 
row School H.D.L Elliott. Coldm 
Gds, The King's School. Worcester 
S.R. Fawcett, PARA. Royal GS. Newcastle: 
AG.L Fenndl R Signals. The Ridgeway 
School. Swindon; G. Fewson. Int Corps. Baines 
CS. Poullon-Le-FykJe: MJ.D. Finlay. AAC, 
Radley College; 05. Ftrmie. R Signals. 
Budmouth School. Weymouth; M.R. Firth. 
QLR. Sponne SdiooL Tcnwcesten FLU. Forbes, 
RA Bristol GS; R.D. Fay. RA St Aiden's HS. 
Blackpool; N.H A Frands-McGann. R Signals. 
John Fisher School Purfey; T.F. Frankd. AAC. 
Centre International de Valbon; J.M. Fryer, 
PWO. Hymert College, Hull: J.P. Carton. RA. 
Queen Elizabeth Hospital School; EJ. Geston. 
REME. Westwood HS. Leek: LW.G. Given. R 
Irish, Antrim GS; AJ. Glass. RE. Lord Howard 
Of Effingham: T.R. Gould. RLC. Ysgol Gyfon 
Gwyr School: F. Gourtay, RLC Wdbeck 
College; J. Green. KOBR. Durham School: NJ. 
Haden. R Anglian. Marling School Stroud; K. 
Haigh. RLC. King Janies HS. Huddersfield; 
AC Hairsine, REME. Uppingham School 
BJ3. Hafisworth, REME. Wdbeck College: 
J.KA Harding. AGC (ETS). Reading School 
E.C.N. Harris. RWF. Stamford School G.R. 
Hams. WG. Oundle School; LD. Hastings. 
RGJ. Falcon College, Bulawayo; P.M. 
Haytmrst, AAC Stonytmrsc College: T.D. 
Heath. R Signals. Stamford School; J.K. High. 
PWRR. Christs Hospital School. Horsham; 
EC HilL RWF. Knox GS. Sydney. Australia; 
KJ. Holloway, AGC (ETS). Southway School. 
Plymouth: EJV1.N. Holme. RHF, Sherborne 
School D.W. Holmes. Kings. Merchant Tay¬ 
lor's School Crosby: N.R. Holmes. D and D. 
Churchill School, Bristol; R.C.D.T. Holtby. 
Gran Gds. Stowe School; MA Hood. RLC. 
Windsor School Rheindahlen: AN. Hopa-aft, R 
Signals. The Portsmouth GS; S.C Hope. RLC 
Abbeyiands School Addles tone; RG Homer. 
R.G.B.WJR. Wydiffe College: DPS Hoy. RGR. 
The Skinners' School; C Humm, PARA Borden 
GS. Sitting bourne: KM. Hurley. AGC (ETS). 
Lady Mary School Cardiff; AJ. Huston, Int 
Corps. Duke of York's RMS; G.B. Ingram, R 
Signals. Royal School Dungannon. 

C -P. James. RA Trent College; GS.D. 
Juhnson, REME. Wdbeck College; TJ. 
Jolliffe, RA Shiplake College: A.E.O. 
Jones, RRW, Chosen Hill School, Gloucester 
W.R. Keford, RGR. Canford School T.W. 
Kdynack. RLC Angmering School Little- 
hamptou; AF. Kennaway. QRH. Downside 
School; AP. Knights, RE, The Royal Latin GS; 
B.H. Lambert R Signals. The Alherley School 
RJ. Laverty. R Irish. Royal Belfast Institution: 
AJ. Lawson. RLC Canon Lee School. York; 
J.F.B. Leeper. RLC King's CoUege School. 
Wimbledon: M.R. Lewin. REME. Tcstwood 
School ToRon; G.C Light IG. Eastbourne 
College: M.G. Lissauer. Coldm Gds. Oundle 
School; J.W. Little. AGC (SPS), The HavcL 
Berlin; SA Livy. AGC (ETS), Beacons held HS: 
J.M.H. Loden. PARA. Worth Abbey; M.P.S. 


Luckyn-M alone. RHF. Amplefonh College; J.O. 
Lyons. RWF. Bishop^ Seortford College: J.D. 
MacDougall. RS. Wdlingion College: C.S. 
MacGregor. KRH. Brighton College; S P. 
Maggs, QRH, Dulwich College; R.E. Maloney. 
AAC Pates GS. Cheltenham: G.D.B. Martin. 
RDG. Bembridge School JJL Martin. PWRR. 
Marlborough CoUege; J.E. Maskell. RE. 
Monkton Combe School; GA Maund, KOBR. 
Shrewsbury School; RJ. Mawcr. .AAC Norwich 
School; CJ. Mdnnryc. QLR. William wood HS. 
Glasgow; LR. McKenzie, RE. Wdbeck College: 

B. C. McMaster. HLDRS. MilJburn Academy. 
Inverness; C.R. Medhurst-Cockswonh. RTR. 
The Judd School Maidstone; MJ.F. 
Middleditdt RLC Lord Wandsworth College: 

C. R Miles. A and SH. Pierrepant School. 
Frensham; S.N. Miles. RA Hereford Cathedral 
School; MJ. Moore. RA Bhke SchooL 
Bridgwater MJ. Mouiarde. QLR Wdbeck 
College: SJ. Mulcahy. RA Repicm School: P.G. 
Newson. R Signals. King James' School: N.E. 
Ord. BW. Wellington CoUege: PA Organ. RLC. 
Brimsham Green School: C. Palmer. LD. 
Wreake College: Z.E.C. Paries. RA Dorriiester 
Castlefidd School RAH. Peas good. LG. Har¬ 
row School: AJ. Pdan. RLC Bancrofts School 
N.C.L Perry KRH. Amplefonh College: B.E. 
Ftecrie. A arid SH. Rannocb School Fftkxhry: 
AJ. Poulain. WG. Lancing CoUese: M.C 
Powell. R Sign als. Plymouth College; SAM. 
Pringle. RTR Cran brook School: AC 
QuamrelL R Irish, Seaford College. 

N R Rae. REME. Glasgow Academy; 
N.M. Record, Int Corps. Mount St 
Marys College; PS Reehal. RLC. 
Oswestry School MA Richards. PARA 
Wellington College; NR Richardson. Stafibnb. 
Adam's GS. Newport J.H. Ridge. RE. Bristol 
GS: ART. Roan. A and SH. Lome Academy. 
Lenzie; CD. Roberts, R Signals. Bembridge 
School: LM. Roberts. RLC. Antrim GS: W.B.G. 
Robertson. RDG. Malvern College; S. Robin¬ 
son. RE, St Robert Of Newminster, S.W. 
Rosenfeld. R Irish. Methodist CoUege. Belfast 
JAR Rous, Cold m Gds . Harrow School; MA 
Rowlands, AGC (ETS). Whitiand GS: E.K. 
Roy lance, AGC (PRO). Frodsham HS; GJWI. 
Rundie. AAC Court Moor School. Fleet AP. 
Samsoooff. U. Berkhamsted SchooL MJ. 
Sargent RA King's SchooL Gloucester C.W.D. 
Sam. AAC. St Edward's School. Oxford: EJ. 
Seymour. RE. Crossley Heath GS; JEG Sharpe. 
RA St John's School, Leatherhead; D.B. 
Simmons, PWRR, St Lawrence College; J J.G. 
Smith. QRH. Allhallows School: P.C.R. Smith. 
RGJ. Christ's Hospital School: RJ. Smith. R 
Signals: International School, Stavanger RJ. 
Snape-Johnson, RA St Brendan's VI Form Coll 
C.M.D. Stanley-Smith. KRH. Eton College; 
AJ JL Stead. R Signals. Nanabundah CoUege; 
A us: D. R. Stevens. REME. Ponadown College; 
SJ. Stevenson. RLC West Bridgford School; 
AG. Tait KOSB. King Edward's School Bath; 
D.P. Talbot RE. St Adreds RC HS. Newton Le 
Willows: P.D. Tapp; RA Northampton School 
for Boys; AR. Taylor. RA Dundee HS: J.W. 
Taylor. RRF. King's School. Tynemouth; M. 
Taylor. RE St Edmund’s SchooL Portsmouth: 
M.G. Taylor. RLC. Barnard Castle School: P.R. 
Taylor. REME The Ward Freeman School: 
B.F.S. Terry. Green Howards. Douai School: 
JA Thorne. RTR. Norwich School; C.H. 
Thrower. RLC. Godolphin School: G.H. Titson. 


RLC. Foy le and Londonderry C J. Tingle. RLC 
Bristol Cathedral School; G.R. Triplow. DWR. 
Loughborough GS: AC Tuipin. Scots Dg. 
Sutton Valence SchooL Maidstone M.PM. 
Walker. KOBR. King's ScbooL Worcester. PJ. 
Wallace. RE. Bolton School: AJ. Ward. AGC 
I ETS). Nest on HS. Nestocu SJ.R. Watkins. RLC 
Whiudiuidi HS. Cardiff; N.C. Webber. RA 
Radies CoUege AF. West. RAMC Regale GS: 
S.P. Wilcocksan. AAC. Old Swinford Hospital: 
MIN. Wilkinson. RLC Bedford Modem 
School: R-P. WIBansan. AGC (SPS). Pontdarud 
HS. Newcastle upon T>tic K.H. Williams. RLC 
Victoria College. Belfast: J. Wilson. RA Preston 
CS. Yeovil RA Wilson. R Signals. Coleraine 
Academic Institute: MJ. Wong. R Signals. St 
Dunstan'5 College- Chester: J.M.H. Woolmer. 
AAC Sedbergh School AP. Young, RA 
Wdbeck CoUege: P.C. Young. R Signals: Lame 
GS: T.T. Youngman Sullivan. Gren Gds. 
Laiymer Upper SchooL 


CHRlSHARglS , p orthc0m ing 

marriages 

Mr RJ- Basset* 

and Miss A.GA .nounced 

C&S! 

Aldeburgh. Suffolk. 

The Hon Adam Bfaker 
and Miss S.R. Lyons ncc( j 

The engagement is annou*^ 

E 3 TSitaS UntifieM- Sussa 

Sa£“S^ 1 rf’ Be« Rep-k 

Dorset. 

Mr AM J- Havfland 
and Miss J.S. Moms 
The engagement is announced 
SveS Andrew Mark James, sm 
of the Rev Edmunds. HaviJarid. of 
Thursley. and of Mrs 
HavilaSd. of Mdiwgluun. and 
Joanne Susan, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs John Morris, of Gravesend. 
Mr GJ.W. Hankins 
and Miss JA Leake j- 

The engagement is annmmoM 
between Guy. elder son of Mr an* 
Mrs BJ.W. Hawkins, of Etift 
Molesey. Surrey, and Janet yotji- 
eer daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Leake. of Birtsmortfn. 

Worcestershire. / 

Mr RJ- Hughes 

and Miss AS. RiddaU 

The engagement is announced 
between Robert eldest son of Mrs 
Eleanor Hughes and the late 
James Hughes, of KathmuUgfc 
House. Downpatrick and Alexan¬ 
dra, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Richard RiddaU. of Said. 

Downpatrick. 

Mr J. Moore 

and Miss S.K. Fairfax-Ross 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, youngest sot of 
Mr and Mrs Donald Moore, of 
Cherry Willingham. Lincolnshire, 
and katie. daughter of Mr and Mrs 
John Fairfax-Ross. of Burbage, 
Wiltshire. 

Mr R.S Watenttone 
and Miss G.C Sheppard 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, son of Mr Timo¬ 
thy Waterstone and Mrs Charles 
Laws, and Georgina, daughter of 
Mr Gurney Sheppard and Mrs 
Charles Gray. 


Overseas 

cadets 


The following overseas cadets also 
passed out with a view to being 
commissioned in the Armed Forces of 
their countries. The winner of the 
Overseas Cane was Officer Cadet 
Prabin-Nepal: 

Bahrain: Sheikh Ahmed bin Hamad 
Al Khalifa. Ahmed bin Isa Al 
Mansoori. 

Belize: Alvin Amoa. 

Brunei: SaUehan bin Pg Omar, Samsul 
Rezal Malek Faesal bin Pg Merali. 
Ghana: Sitsope Kofi Wotordzor. 
Guatemala: Pedro Guerrero Salazar. 
Guyana: An cel Delmar Semple. 
Jamaica: Sean Dwayne Reid. 

Kuwait Sheikh Abdullah bin Nasser 
Al Sabah, Sheikh Athbi bin Abdullah 
Al Sabah. 

Malta: Neville Galea. 

Mauritius: Hem an Koomar Lollbe- 
harree. 

Nepal: Prabin Bahadur Khadka. 

Qatar Hamed bin Ghanem Al Ali, 
Sheikh Jassim bin Hamad Ai Thani. 
Sierra Leone: Francis Tamba Kassim 
Koroma. 

Singapore: Lim Kah Keng, Simon Ng 
ftng Kuan. 

Sri Lanka: Gakishan Ravinda 

Gunaratne. 

Swaziland; Clement Mazweya Sibiya. 
Thailand: Ukaradej PimsorrananonL 
Trinidad and Tobago: Roger Andre 
McLean. 

UAE: Mohammed Thani Al Mehairi. 


Latest wills 

The Dowager Countess of 
Donoughroore, of High Good- 
ham, Symington. Ayrshire, left 
estate valued at £15Sj267 net %L -. 
left her estate mostly to relative^ 
Sir Peter Waxkin Williams, former 
High Court judge and Chief Jus¬ 
tice of Malawi, of Stockland. 
Honiton. Devon, left estate valued 
at E243.199 net. 

He left £500 to the British Heart 
Foundation, £100 to the Imperial 
Cancer Research Fund. 

Mr Desmond (Christopher) 
Shawc-Thyior, a former chief 
musk critic of The Sunday Times, 
of Long CricheL Wimborne, Dor¬ 
set, left estate valued at £1,287,243 
net. 

Sir Thomas Pad more, former 
Private Secretary to the Chancellor 
of the Exchequer (19045), Perma¬ 
nent Secretary to the Minister for 
Transport (1962-68), and Hon 
Treasurer of the Institute of Cancer 
Research (1973-81), of Highgate. 
London, left estate valued at 
£754.068 neL 

Sir Kenneth Robinson, former 
Chief of the Arts Council of Great 
Britain (1972-82), Minister for 
Health, Minister for Planning and 
Land. Minister for Housing and 
Local Government, Director of 
Soda! Policy, Chairman of British 
Steel Corporation, Chairman of 
English National Opera. C{ 
Highgate, London, left estate Val¬ 
ued at £407.475 neL 
Sir Neil Lawson, former High 
COurt Judge, of Hampstead. 
London, left estate valued at 
£693,184 net 

He left £20.000 ro the Musicians' 
Benevolent Fund: £30.000 to rbe 
Royal Free Hospftal for the benefit 
or the sisters, nurses, junior 
doctors' mess and rhe medical 
auxiliaries; £50.000 to the 
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of Cjuefiy lo Children; 
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loved father of Stephen, 
Carolyn and Jonathan, 
adored grandfather of 
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Batnahy. Pnunrid Service at 
Chelsea Old Chare fa on 
Tuesday August 20th at 
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1996, peacefully after a 
Short mness,ngad 81 year*. 
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(nfa LesasXs) of Radlstt, 
Herts, widow of Charles 
Edmund Hearn, killed In 
action in January 1944. 
Funeral Service Wednesday 
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Society c/o Chaa. A. 
Netbercott A Son Ltd, 20 
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H0L—1 - Helen Martin tofo 
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MEMORIAL SERVICES 


HARMED - A Service in 
D mel u fe ’ b mreinty wm be 
held et the Church of Sr 
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gS™agT WRs DAY AUGUST ,5 » 

Obituaries 


Captain Bobby Petre. 
wmnrrofthe^^ 

dicd on Augua 
3 ag*rfS4. Hcwasho^ 
Lond 00 on Februai^g 
1912. 

IzSSJjgg 
*£"£?»? Gn y Na= 

Saie ^ outslder Lovely 

SS^-'SbiiSS 

cha . r S e an more 
SS* o d on tele- 

S"»«* crowd, relaxing 

W sunshine - certain¬ 

ly had their moneys worth as 
an amateur rider strode to 

E®"?** 1 whaI was first 
Grand National to be ran after 

of the Second World 

j The favourite, the 3-1 shot 
’ rrmce Regent. w as well beat- 
en into third place that day 
But this did not detract from 
the enjoyment of the crowd 
who revelled in the neck-and- 
neck duel almost all the way to 
W 1 * lu1 ^ 35 Lovely Cottage 
held off the second placed 
horse, the 100-1 chance Jack 
Finlay. 

With such a dramatic entry 
into postwar steeplechasing, to 
add to a reputation as the most 
accomplished amateur rider of 
the 1930s, Petre seemed to 
nave golden opportunities 
ahead of him. when he turned 
professional shortly after¬ 
wards. But within two years 
his riding career was in ruins. 
First, a severe injury in 1948 


CAPTAIN BOBBY PETRE 


i'&rSIV’.i 


; -v. 

-v*— 


l\ •.*».. - ,r., ■ 


- _■ • V-^-V >1 


‘■fiPWJ 





p lllp jg 






Petre. aboard the bay gelding Lovely Cottage, holds off Jack Finlay to win the 


prevented him from riding 
compelirively again. Then his 
O’ainjng licence was with¬ 
drawn when one of his horses 
failed a dope test. Thereafter 
his career was in farming, not 
on the Turf. 

Robert Charles Petre was 
bom in Mayfair, the son of an 
army officer, and educated at 
Harrow and Sandhurst. There 
he was a near contemporary of 
Fulke Walwyn, who was as an' 
amateur rider to win the 1936 
Grand National before em¬ 
barking on a great career as a 
National Hunt trainer. 


1946 Grand National with the favourite: Prince Regent faraway in third place 


Petre very soon made his 
mark in poim-to-points. and 
then in National Hunt racing 
in the 1930s in what was to be a 
golden age for amateur riders. 
His first winner under Nat¬ 
ional Hunt rules was in 1930 
on his father's mare Hero Lass 
at Wincanton in 1930. Very 
soon he was establishing him¬ 
self among the leading ama¬ 
teur riders of his day, 
becoming joint champion in 
1937-38 and sole champion the 
following year. His most fam¬ 
ous victojy in that period was 
on St George in the 1938 


National Hunt Chase at Chel¬ 
tenham. then regarded as the 
amateur Grand National. 

A regular officer in the Scots 
Guards, he served as a captain 
throughout the Second World 
War. in the disastrous Norwe¬ 
gian campaign of 1940. and 
subsequently in Italy from 
1943 onwards. 

After demobilisation he app¬ 
lied himself again to his racing 
career and soon forged a 
partnership with the bay geld¬ 
ing Lovely Cottage, which was 
owned by J. Morant and 
trained by Tommy Rayson in 


Hampshire. Their first outing 
together was not particularly 
auspicious: the horse fell at 
Wincanton. But it later won at 
Taunton, a performance 
which qualified it for an 
ousider's — though not a rank 
outsider’s — starting price of 
25-1 for the eagerly-expected 
first postwar Grand National. 

The event attracted a record 
crowd and is regarded as 
being one of the most dramatic 
examples of this always heroic 
steeplechase. The hot favour¬ 
ite, Prince Regent, led for most 
of the way and was ai least 20 


lengths dear of the rest of the 
field as he jumped the lasi-but- 
one fence from home. At that 
stage his backers were count¬ 
ing their money and the 
bookies’ brows were furrowed. 
Prince Regent was still in front 
when he jumped the last, but 
by this time he was beginning 
to tire under the I2st 51b he 
was carrying, and his rivals 
were beginning to take closer 
order. 

With a 251b weight advan¬ 
tage. Lovely Cottage and Bob¬ 
by Pfctre took up the running, 
surging past the favourite. But 


they were themselves hotly 
pursued by Jack Finlay who 
came through with a formida¬ 
ble burst on the outside. In the 
event. Petre and his mount 
proved too strong for Jack 
Finlay and their four-length 
margin at the tvinning post 
put the result beyond argu¬ 
ment Only six of the 34 
starters finished the race. 

Soon afterwards. Petre 
turned professional, and also 
took out a trainer's licence, 
working at Tun worth. Hamp¬ 
shire. He rode in the 1947 
Grand National, falling on 


Silver Fame, but he later won 
at Garrick Castle. But his 
career on the Turf was almost 
Immediately afterwards to be 
devastated by two mishaps. 
While out exercising his hors¬ 
es on the beach at Bognor 
Regis in March 1948 he had a 
bad fall while jumping from 
the sea wall, and broke a leg. 
Tliis did not at first seem 
serious, but complications set 
in from the fracture, and the 
upshot was that he had to have 
his leg amputated. It was the 
end of his National Hunt 
riding career. 

To compound his misfor¬ 
tunes. shortly afterwards, a 
previous misdemeanour came 
home 10 roost In the January 
1948 meeting at Plumpion he 
had pulled up in the 
Gooksbridge Handicap Hur¬ 
dle on Bray Star, from whom 
saliva and sweat samples were 
subsequently required. In 
May that year, after a stew¬ 
ards’ enquiry, it was estab¬ 
lished that a stimulant had 
been administered to Bray 
Star and Petra's training Li¬ 
cence was withdrawn by the 
National Hunt Committee. 

It was the end of any direct 
association with the Turf. 
Thereafter Petre’s career was 
in agricultural estate manage¬ 
ment, though he continued to 
ride and hunt in Hampshire. 
He was for a number of years 
active in the Country Land- 
owners’ Association. But he 
was eventually allowed back 
onto the racecourse: in 1985 at 
Liverpool he and other surviv¬ 
ing Grand National winning 
jockeys each received a trophy 
from the Princess Royal 

Petre married, in 1934. Ma¬ 
rie Delphine Chichester and 
they had three children. 


JOHN LANIGAN 


John Lanigan, 
Australian-born operatic 
tenor, died on August I 
aged 75. He was born on 
January 7,1921. 

XIURING a quarter of a 
4piitury at Covent Garden in 
which he sang more than 80 
roles, the tenor John Lanigan 
made a valuable and distin¬ 
guished contribution to Brit¬ 
ish operatic life. Had he. as he 
once halfseriousiy wished, 
been “born with all voice and 
no brain", he might have 
enjoyed a more spectacular 
arid glamorous career. As it 
was, the lifestyle and methods 
of the jet-setting international 
star held little appeal for him; 
he came instead to epitomise 
the kind of versatile, dedicated 
and unpretentious artist on 
whom opera companies can 
depend. 

In the 1950s Lanigan con¬ 
centrated on lyric roles, to 
which his ardent, stylish tenor 
and youthful good looks were 
well suited. Later he moved on 
to character parts, excelling 
especially as Mime and as 
Shuisky. the scheming boyar 
in Mussorgsky's Boris Godu¬ 
nov. He also created roles in 

« me of the most important 
w operas to be premiered in 
Britain during his career, 
from Tippett’s The Midsum¬ 
mer Marriage in 1955. to Hans 
Werner Henze’s We Come to 
the River in 1976. 

John Lanigan was bom in 
Victoria, Australia. His moth¬ 
er sang operetta, and his 
father was a keen amateur 


RICHARD GOODWIN 


tenor. After studies in Mel¬ 
bourne Lanigan made his 
way, via Italy, to London, 
making his debut at the Stoll 
Theatre in 1949 as Fenton in 
Verdi'S Falstaff and Rodolfo in 
La Bohime. He first sang at 
the Royal Opera House in 
1951, as Thaddeus in Balfe*s 
The Bohemian Girt, conduct¬ 
ed by Sir Thomas Beecham. 
Later that year he joined the 
resident Covent Garden Com¬ 
pany, making his debut as the 
Duke in Rigoletto. 

He remained with the com¬ 
pany for 25 years. A natural 
team player, he relished those 
early years; “When I first 
joined there was a much more 
integrated performance," he 
said in an interview in 1973. 
“We didn't have many Giglis 
or Gobbis, but they were good 
singers. I've never seen such 
teamwork." 

In Iris first decade at Covent 
Garden his roles included 
Tamino, Alfredo. Pinkerton. 
Des Grieux (Motion), Jenik, 
Aim a viva and Laca fin Covent 
Garden's first production of 
Jana&k’S Jenufa, when his 
performance was hailed as 
“an admirable portrait of one 
of opera’s most veracious and 
complex characters"). His 
Cassio in Verdi’s Otelto was 
acclaimed by the editor of 
Opera magazine as “the best 
sung interpretation of the pan 
I have ever heard". 

In the 1960s Lanigan's reluc¬ 
tance to pursue an interna¬ 
tional career at the expense of 
family life, combined with a 
bout of serious nasal trouble 











W 


Lanigan with Adele Leigh in The Midsummer Marriage, Covent Garden, 1955 


that eventually required sur¬ 
gery. led him to turn from 
what he called “the young 
lover parts" to the develop¬ 
ment of character roles. 

His outstanding portrayal 
of Mussorgsky’s devious 
prince Tone of the best 
Shuiskys there can ever have 
been”) was committed to 
record in 1964. with Andre 
Cluytens conducting and Bo¬ 
ris Christoff singing the roles 


of Boris, Pimen and Varlaam. 
Lanigan also recorded the 
Rector in Peter Grimes and Dr 
Caius in Falstaff. As a memo¬ 
rable Mime he made some of 
his rare foreign appearances, 
performing the role in New 
York and Chicago. 

Enthusiasm for the chal¬ 
lenges of contemporary music 
was a constant of Lanigan’s 
career, and he sang in nearly 
at1 the important postwar 


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British operas (The Knot 
Garden and Billy Budd were 
almost die only notable excep¬ 
tions). The unctuous Rector 
was one of several Britten 
roles in his repertoire, some of 
which he shared with Peter 
Pgars at Covent Garden: he 
was Flute in A Midsummer 
Night’s Dream . Essex in 
Gloriana and Sir Philip in 
Owen Wingrave. He also sang 
Pandarus in Walton* Troilus 
and Cressida. 

Among foe roles he created 
were Jack in Tippett’s The 
Midsummer Marriage (1955), 
Hermes in the same compos¬ 
ers King Priam (1962). Jones 
in Richard Rodney Bennett's 
Victory (1970), the Cardi¬ 
nal/Archbishop in Maxwell 
Davies’S Taverner (1972, the 
composers first major operat-- 
ic work) and the Soldier/ 
Madman in Henze’s sprawl¬ 
ing, controversial We Come to 
the River (1976). 

Lanigan gave his last per¬ 
formance at the Royal Opera 
House in 1981. After retire¬ 
ment, he moved to Canada. 

He is survived by his wife 
and a son, who works at 
Covent Garden, 


Richard Goodwin, 
economist died on 

August 6 aged 83. He was 
born on February 24, 
1913.- 

RICHARD GOODWIN was 
an economist of distinction 
and originality, who taught at 
the universities of Harvard, 
Cambridge and Siena. He was 
also a talented painter and the 
artistic side of him found this 
last posting particularly 
congenial. 

Richard Murphey Goodwin 
was bom in Indiana into a 
family of upper middle-class 
farmers and small merchants. 
But there were two profession¬ 
al artists as well, and this had 
a considerable influence on 
Goodwin's life. His education, 
he claimed, began only when 
he came to Harvard in 1930, 
where he in due course gradu¬ 
ated summa cum laude in 
Economics- He then went to St 
John's College, Oxford, as a 
Rhodes Scholar to read PPE. 
In 1937 he returned to Har¬ 
vard with a BLitt and he 
completed his PhD in 1941. He 
then taught at Harvard until 
foe early 1950s when he left for 
Cambridge where he settled. 
He was a Reader in Econom¬ 
ics and a Fellow of Peterhouse. 

On retirement from Cam¬ 
bridge in 1980 lie moved to 
Siena, where he was appoint¬ 
ed a professor at the univer¬ 
sity. This was an inspired 
decision, since it led to an 
astonishing ten years of fruit¬ 
ful research and to a legacy of 
students who had been in¬ 
spired by him, and are now 
well on foe way in establishing 
their own reputations. 

In economics Goodwin pub¬ 
lished relatively rarely, but 
what he did publish will 
endure. Perhaps his most 
outstanding piece was a non¬ 
linear model of fluctuations 
where, with great elegance 
and originality, he incorporat¬ 
ed some famous ideas of his 
teacher Schumpeter into a 
flexible accelerator mecha¬ 
nism. This work was very 
influential and led to much 
further research. His original¬ 
ity is well exemplified in his 
paper in the Dobb Festschrift, 
where he applied the Volterra 
equations erf predator-prey cy¬ 
cles to an economic model of 


oscillations. While no doubt 
something of a parable, rather 
than a description, it was 
fascinating and very sugges¬ 
tive, and foe ideas have been 
taken up by others. 

In ' Siena, mathematical 
progress in non-linear dynam¬ 
ics and chaos theory reignited 
Goodwin’s abiding interest in 
dynamics. He published a 
number of books on economic 
fluctuations, where foe new 
mathematics was fruitfully 
applied. These books are nota¬ 
ble for a number of interesting 
(and beautiful) computer sim¬ 
ulations. 

Goodwin's other great inter¬ 



est was in linear economics, 
and early on he published a 
very interesting paper on the 
“matrix multiplier", which 
was in foe spirit of another of 
his Harvard mentors, Leon- 
def. Later he was drawn into 
foe controversies occasioned 
by Sraffa’s work, but never 
followed the more absurd 
turns in this debate. He wrote 
a textbook largely on this 
topic, but it was much closer to 
von Neuman’s famous contri¬ 
bution than to the “Neo- 
Ricardians". His interest in 
the Ricardian revival in his 
technical work no doubt owed 
something to the belief that 
Marxian value theory could 
be given rigorous expression. 
But all of this theoretical work 
in economics has the mark of a 
careful, fastidious and imagi¬ 
native mind, and his Fest¬ 
schrift. to which many 
economists contributed, testi¬ 
fies to the esteem in which he 
was held. 


In the 1930s Goodwin, like 
so many others, joined the 
Communist Party. It is diffi¬ 
cult to believe that this scepti¬ 
cal man of aristocratic 
temperament ever found this 
company congenial, and it is 
certain that he was driven by a 
sense of duty and perhaps 
some despair at the state of the 
world. He left foe party during 
the war, but this did not stop 
him from being pursued by 
Senator McCarthy. He re¬ 
mained on the Left all his life, 
although he hated political 
activity and had to drive 
himself to participate in iL 
But economics was at most 
half of Goodwin’s life, the 
other was painting. He exhib¬ 
ited both here and in foe 
United States, and the facul¬ 
ties of economics both in 
Cambridge and Siena own 
some notable examples. There 
are also many pieces in private 
collections, and it is clear that 
he had the makings of artistic 
distinction. Although happi¬ 
est when painting, his other 
interests and obligations pre¬ 
vented him from devoting 
himself fully to that pursuit. 
Indeed he was somewhat torn 
between economics and paint¬ 
ing, and he believed that this 
prevented him from really 
giving his best to either. 

As an economist, he was too 
modest in his views. He was. 
quite correctly, judged by oth¬ 
ers to be of outstanding ability. 
His early work on the supply 
of money, and on Indian dev¬ 
elopment, also showed that he 
was not just a theorist. 

Goodwin was wine steward 
of his college. He loved beauti¬ 
ful cars and beautiful clothes. 
Italy and India (where until 
recently he went to paint in the 
summers). In Siena he himself 
was loved not only by col¬ 
leagues but by many others, 
including foe owners of the 
best restaurant, which he of¬ 
ten frequented and where his 
photograph is prominently on 
display. His courtesy, charm 
and distinguished appearance 
invited admiration. In foe 
University of Siena there is 
now a Richard Goodwin semi¬ 
nar room with a number of his 
fine paintings on the wall. 

He is survived by his wife 
Jacqueline, a graduate of Som¬ 
erville: there were no children. 


THE MARINE POLICE. 

We are happy to find that the NEW 
MARINE POLICE ESTABLISHMENT 
meets with such general concurrence 
among the Merchants. If a. conjecture 
might be hazarded as to foe advantages 
already obtained, grounded on a com¬ 
parison of the extent of depredations 
formerly committed, it may be fairly 
concluded that the saving on the last 
West India fleet alone in sugar, rum, 
coffee, and other articles, must amount 
to from 50 to 60,0001. at the lowest 
compurarion: which saving will more 
fully appear when the sales are returned, 
and when these sales are compared with 
those of former years. The River Thames 
never in the memory of man was so 
favourably circumstanced as it has been 
since foe establishment of the Marine 
Police. All river pirates, and other 
suspicious persons who used to infest it, 
are now completely banished, and 
nothing can be conceived more stiU and 
quiet than every fart of the River is in the 
night. The Police Surveyors, who pro¬ 
ceed every evening from London Bridge 


ON THIS DAY 

August 15,1798 


The word piracy is not usually associat¬ 
ed with the river that flows through the 
heart of our capita/. 


to Deptford on both tides, and continue 
on duty from ten at night until five in the 
morning never have (except in two 
instances) met a suspicious character, or 
detected any offender. Previous to this 
institution, numbers of criminal charac¬ 
ters were accustomed to ply upon the 
River after dark, and great dangers were 
often to be appreheneded from river 
pirates and nightly plunderers, and 
perhaps, too. from incendiaries, against 
whose criminal and treasonable designs 
foe River Thames was perhaps never 


better protected than at the present 

mon>ent. 

The Emperor of Russia directs a consid¬ 
erable share of his attention to the 
regulation of dress, not only with respect 
to his own subjects, but to all foreigners 
who visit Russia, and who are equally 
obliged to comply wifo foe prescribed 
costume. Hie prohibition of round hats, 
pantaloons, neck-handkerchiefs, half¬ 
boots, shoe-strings etc. is strictly en¬ 
forced; and several English Factors, 
Merchants, and Captains of vessels, who 
lately arrived at Fetersburgh. were 
absolutely prevented from going abroad, 
until they could decorate themselves 
according to the new fashion. As 
business of urgence made it necessary 
for some of them to wait immediately 
upon their correspondents, they were 
indulged at foe request of our Ambassa¬ 
dor, with the permission of going 
abroad, with the express exception, 
however, of only appearing in round 
hats or pantaloons, until they could be 
completely dressed in the Imperial style. 


—~ c urr. .-k'.rtoh.-.irVrs mnrvri nartie^- to sneak lor 27.9 per cent. 


iviuff-w, ---i 


















20 TRAVEL NEWS 

Ferry starts 
next year’s 
price war 


THE TIMES 


THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 



Leaves 


By Steve Keenan 

A CHANNEL ferry price war traffic, u 
for 1997 has begun, with one The com 
operator offering the same ship wi 
rock-bottom fares as this beginnin 
summer. But 

Sea France is selling return France 
crossings for as low as £79 per says: “Wi 
car and up to five occupants every me 
this summer and guarantees for betwc 
purchasers the same fare next of the fer 
year. Standard returns for £95 of the yea 
on the Dover-Calais route going, pe 
carry the same deal. fire last r 

The French-owned com- ings. For 
pany, which only started ser- known ii 
vice under a new name in doing toe 
January, has pledged to The exi 

match any lower fare nexr er opera I 
year. “We are determined to speed, w 
lead the way in the battle of the cent of tf 
cross-Channel fares. Even if of oomp 
prices are lowered next year Stena ai 
then the customer can't lose," Shuttle s 
says Robin Wilkins, the man- have bee 
aging director. the boo 

This attempt to keep cus- and day 
tamers reflects the pressure Hoversp< 

smaller companies are under lion pas: 
after the summer cuts. routes in 

Today Stena introduces the this year, 
biggest ship seen out of Dover, cars. Thi 
the Stena Empereur, capable works on 
of carrying 2,000 passengers car. 
and SO cars. The company Le Shi 

now runs four ferries and two third of t] 
catamarans on the route to market, x 
Calais, which accounts for SO — in tei 
per cent of cross-Channel being P& 
traffic. The com| 

In the first six months of this cent of pi 
year. Sally Ferries lost 25 per Calais. 8 
cent of its passengers on the mem alio 
two routes from Ramsgate, rivals abc 
while Sea France carried just 8 tion, the li 
per cent of ferry passengers is unlikel; 
and less than 5 per cent or ail for 1997. 


traffic, including Eurotunnel. 
The company was in partner¬ 
ship with Stena until the 
beginning of the year. 

But Bill Laidlaw. Sea 
France operations director, 
says: “We have made progress 
every month and are looking 
for between 12 and 14 per cent 
of the ferry market by the end 
of the year. The way things are 
going, people are waiting until 
Sie last minute to make book¬ 
ings. For a new company not 
known in the UK we are not 
doing too badly." 

The exception among small¬ 
er operators has been Hover- 
speed. which has kept 10 per 
cent of the market in the face 
of competition from P&O. 
Stena and Eurotunnel’s Le 
Shuttle service. The numbers 
have been largely buoyed by 
the booze-cruise, shopping 
and day-trip market While 
H overspeed carried l_H mil¬ 
lion passengers on its two 
routes in the first six months of 
this year, it took only 133,000 
cars. The industry normally 
works on four passengers to a 
car. 

Le Shuttle has taken one 
third of the car and passenger 
market, with the biggest loser 
— in terms of numbers — 
being P&O European Ferries. 
The company has lost 16 per 
cent of passengers on Dover- , 
Calais. But with the Govern- , 
mem allowing P&O to talk to ' 
rivals about possible co-opera- 
tion, the line-up of competitors I 
is unlikely to remain the same I 
for 1997. 


breathless. 

Rather 


Oxygen of publicity: Scottish Tourist Board poster aimed specifically at harassed commuters in the South East 

Scotland in bid to 
make capital gains 


SHORT SEA FEBBY MARKET 

(January-Juiy 1,1996) 



Cars 

(thousands) 

Passengers 

(millions) 

Le Shuffle 

820(36%) 

700(31%) 

4.79 (35%) 

P&O 

3.90 (28%) 

Stena 

377 (16%) 

234 (16%) 

Hovorspeed 

133(6%) 

1.34(10%) 

Sally Femes 

157(7%) 

1.06(7% 
059 (4%) 

Sea France 

102 (4%) 

Total 

2^90,000 

13,718,000 

Routes Included Dovai-Calais. Folkestone-Boulogne, 
Ostend/DunJwk Source; Travel Press 

Ramsgate- 


LONDON’S polluted air is 
being exploited by Scotland to 
persuade tourists to turn their 
backs on the capital and head 
for die dean air of the hills and 
glens that lie north of the 

Thousands of posters will be 
put up today in Underground 
and mainline railway stations 
telling commuters that “Scot¬ 
land leaves you breathless 
rather like the air in London”. 

The £185.000 poster cam¬ 
paign is part of a £1.5 million 
drive designed to boost still 
further Scotland's tourism in¬ 
dustry which is wooing record 
numbers of holidaymakers 
from the South East. 

This no-holds-barred mar¬ 
keting ploy has infuriated the 
London Tourist Board. “It is 
unfortunate that the Scottish 
Tourist Board advertising 
campaign seems couched in 
competitive terms," said Paul 
Hopper, managing director of 
theLTB. 

“If you want a choice of 100 
theatres. 125 dnemas and 
11,000 pubs, dubs and restau¬ 
rants. you will have to come to 
London. However, if a quiet 
sunset over the mountains is 
what you are after, then 


By Harvey Elliott 


Algarve 

£400m 

facelift 

By Martin Symington 


PLANS have been unveiled to 
turn the Algarve resort of 
Vllamoura into Europe's larg¬ 
est leisure complex. The E400 
million project is to be com¬ 
pleted over 20 years, accord¬ 
ing to Andr6 Jordan, chair¬ 
man of Groupo Andre Jordan, 
which three months ago ac¬ 
quired a 38 per cent stake in 
the resort. 

Two golf courses are to be 
added to foe existing three: 
6.000 villas and low-rise 
apartments are to be built, 
taking the total tourist capaci¬ 
ty from the current 35.000 to 
57,000. There are also plans to 
landscape200 acres with lakes 
and canals to create a nature 
park, themed on marine life. 

Other developments indude 
an equestrian centre and a 
7,000-caparity sports and en¬ 
tertainments arena. Work is 
expected to begin in January 
1997. Top of the list is the first 
golf course, which former US 
Masters' champion Bernhard 
Langer has been commis¬ 
sioned to design. 


Credit hitch 
for hotel users 


By David Churchill 


BUSINESS travellers who 
use their credit cards as a 
guarantee when checking into 
hotels are warned that some 
international hotel chains are 
debiting “significant” 
amounts to their cards hi 
cover the cost of the room and 
other charges even when 
guests plan to settle then- 
accounts by other means. This 
can unknowingly leave travel¬ 
lers with little spare plastic 
credit for the rest of their trip. 

Die warning has come 
from the Guild of Business 
Travel Agents. Philip Car¬ 
lisle, the Guild's chief execu¬ 
tive, says the issue has been 
raised by a number of execu¬ 
tives. “One executive was 
unable to hire a car when in 
America because the card’s 
limit had been reached in this 
way, even though in theory he 
had plenty of credit left" he 
says. “Amounts can be deb¬ 
ited to the card account even 
when the hotel bill is paid tty 
other means, and this can 
render the card unusable for 
the remainder of a trip." 

The problem only arises 


with Visa, Mastercard and 
other credit cards which have 
a fixed limit Charge cards 
such as American Express 
and Diners Club have no pre¬ 
set limit Hotels run a credit 
check with guests’ credit cards 
on check-in to ensure that the 
room bill is covered. 

The Guild, however, wants 
hotels to advise customers, 
when they are caking a card 
imprint of Che guarantee 
amount that will be set 
against it It also wants hotels 
to ensure that the amount is 
cleared from the credit card 
account immediately the cus¬ 
tomers settles the bill. 

□ British Airways has linked 
up with Diners Club to 
launch a personal charge card 
offering Air Miles for most 
expenditure using the card. 
BA/ Diners Club card holders 
will belong to BA's Executive 
Club and. in addition to a 300 
MOes bonus on joining and a 
further bonus later on. will 
receive one Air Mfle for every 
£5 spent on BA flights and 
one Mile for every E10 on 
other expenditure. 


-•tv-'. ’ 




.'-1 \ V* 

"i-jV: .V 


V'-'VW 


.•'W LiF 





Scotland is definitely the 
place." 

Scottish tourism leaders 
were unrepentant. “Two 
places as diverse as Scotland 
and London ought to be able 
to coexist" said the Scottish 
Tourist Board. "The fact is. 
though, that the environment 
is different in London than in 
Scotland. All we are doing is 
trying to point out that the 
quality of life is different and. 
with a certain amount of irony 
and levity, that Scotland is 
affordable, accessible and 
different" 

The idea behind the cam¬ 
paign is to convince commut¬ 
ers crammed into crowded 
trains to make a spur-of-the- 
moment decision to spend a 
few days in Scotland, 
especially in the autumn. 

The attempt to extend the 
holiday season into the au¬ 
tumn was first tried last year 
with the launch of an Autumn 
Gold brochure. It proved so 
successful that this year it is 
being extended with many 
parts of the industry combin¬ 
ing to o ffer p ackage deals 
which, the STB claims, can be 


half the price of similar breaks 
in England. 

Ryanair is offering a return 
flight from Stansted to Glas¬ 
gow Prestwick from E49 with 
onward rail travel anywhere 
in Scotland for an extra £5. 
The limited number of seats 
must be booked seven days in 
advance and are not available 
on Fridays or Sundays. 

Intercity West Coast is of¬ 
fering two London to Glasgow 
tickets for the price of one: £29. 

Bed and breakfast in a 
farmhouse costs from £13 a 
night or a room in a castle 
from £27 a night per person. 

Historic properties, includ¬ 
ing Edinburgh and Stirling 
castles, are staying open long¬ 
er and the Autumn Gold 
promotion provides two ad¬ 
missions to any Scottish Nat¬ 
ional Trust property for the 
price of one. 

Although most of the esti¬ 
mated five million British 
visitors to Scotland each year 
make their own arrange¬ 
ments, a typical three-night 
package including return air 
travel, car hire and dinner, 
bed and breakfast would cost 


Packages now cost 
less than in 1977 


By Harvey Elliott 

PACKAGE holiday prices 
have tumbled by almost half 
in the past 20 years. The 
dramatic fall, in real terms, of 
the cost of taking a foreign 
holiday has led to four times 
as many package tourists 
heading abroad by air and 
opened up many long distance 
destinations that were almost 
untouched in 1977. 

The full extent of the drop in 
price was discovered by 
Thomson researchers who 
were trawling through old 
brochures in their head office. 

“At first sight the prices in 
1977 appeared low— but when 
you then took account of 
inflation it suddenly became 
apparent just how cheap they 
now are," says Gloria Ward 
who carried out the research. 

A 14-night package to the 
Hotel Santa Lucia in Majorca 
in May 1977. for example, cost 
£131. the equivalent of £435 
today. Yet in the 1997 brochure 
the same holiday is £3S9. 
Seven nights in the Materada 
Hotel. Croatia — then a fav¬ 
ourite destination for Britons 
— was £128 during the sum¬ 
mer peak, £425 in today's 
money. The price in the 1W 
brochure is £355. Further 
afield, Shaw Park Jamaica 
could offer 14 nights for £429 



Jamaica: what was the equivalent of £1,425 is now £1,069 


half board, or £1,425 now: the 
price today is £1.069 inclusive. 

The main reason for the 
drop, especially in long-haul 
travel, has been the introduc¬ 
tion of charter aircraft on the 
popular routes. "Anyone can 
go to Australia for under £600 
now, which was unthinkable 
20 years ago.” says Ms Ward. 

Anyone who has not 
booked for this summer, how¬ 
ever, will find little still 
available and what there is 
will be at the full price. 

Lunn Poly yesterday had a 
seven-night Airtours self-ca¬ 
tering holiday to Majorca on 


August 23 for £379 and there is 
a seven-night Horizon self¬ 
catering holiday at Los 
Gigantes, Tenerife, from Stan¬ 
sted on September 4. for £244. 

Last year operators were 
desperate to sell thousands of 
unsold holidays at the last 
moment. This year there are 
fewer available — and cust¬ 
omers have to be quick. A 
colleague saw on Teletext a 
week's self-catering holiday in 
Majorca for E239 and rang 
immediately. 

"I've just sold it", die tele¬ 
phonist said. “You’re going to 
have to move faster than that!” 


US train 
routes cut 


By Quentin Letts 

AN AMERICAN version of Arinas 01 



E1S5 a person. Tourism to 
Scotland declined in the early 
pan of this decade, and in 
1995 there was a fall of 8 per 
cent in the amount being 
spent. Last year this was 
reversed, with a 7 pier cent 
increase. 

English visitors to Scotland 
spent an estimated £800 mil¬ 
lion in 1995 — 1! per cent more 
than the previous year — and 
tourists from the South East 
brought in E330 million of 
that. Hollywood films such as 
Rob Roy, B raw heart and 
Loch Mess are also believed to 
have helped stimulate interest 
in Scottish holidays in the 
past two years. 

Rain in Scotland is less 
likely in October and Novem¬ 
ber than in July and AugusL 
The 30-year average rainfall 
in Edinburgh is 45mm in 
October compared wiih 79mm 
in August: Shetland has seven 
minutes’ more daylight than 
London at the beginning of 
October, visibility can be as 
much as 35 miles in the 
autumn and the midge — the 
creature which has put off 
more visitors than any tourist 
campaign has attracted — dies 
with the first frosts of October. 


the Beeching cuts to passenger 
train services has been an¬ 
nounced- with 12 per esm of 
the US rail network affected 
and some of the most evoca¬ 
tive routes through the old 
Wild West likely to be closed. 

Amtrak. the national train 
operator, says that shortage of 
federal government funds will 
force it to close three major 
routes in November. The 
threatened closure will de¬ 
prive 42 towns and cities of 
passenger train services. 

Casualties will indude the 
Pioneer run between Denver 
and Seattle, named after die 
frontiersmen for whom trains 
were a lifeline during the 
westward conquest in the 19th 
century. The wonderfully 
named Desen Wind express, 
connecting Salt Lake City and 
Los Angdes. will vanish, as 
wifi the Texas Eagle between 
St Louis and San Antonio. 

Tom Downs, president of 
Amtrak. left open die possibili¬ 
ty of a reprieve but said it was 
“ninety-nine to one that these 
cuts will take place”. The lines 
are losing money and their 
axing wifi allow for an in¬ 
crease in services on better- 
patronised lines. Amtrak has a 
5200 million (£133 million! 
budget deficit and faces a $50 
million reduction in support. 

Texas will be particularly 
badly hit. Eleven cities, indud- 
ing Austin. Dallas, Fort Worth 
and Mineola. will lose their 
passenger services. So will 


base. Little Rock. Arkansas 

The cuts will represent tne 
biggest reduction in rati 
viST since I?™, when the 

Carter Administration made 
sharp cutbacks in a nenvortt 

that once criss-crossed Amen 

ca. The mournful clanking % 
bell of approaching trains is «•! 
seldom heard in many parts or 
the US. where the car and tne 
plane have come to ru le. 

Maintaining the nules or 
track across the continent 
played havoc with the eco¬ 
nomics of train travel, and 
passengers appeared to have 
less taste for communal vqy- 
aging than their European J 
and Asian cousins. m 

Amtrak, which has stnig- r 
gled to keep down organised * 
labour costs and could not m 
shake off a downmarket, doo- u 
dery image, was also undone m 
by its failure to keep to m 
timetables- The public percepj 
tion was unfair — trains araf 
comfortable, the staff genial, 
and the vistas formidable +- 
but passenger numbers re- 
mained disappointing. “7 

Even before news of the . 
cuts, railway enthusiasts were 
dispirited after Amtrak did 
away with some of the roman¬ 
tic names of its trains. Names 
such as The Senator and the 
Connecticut Yankee were re- - 
placed with “product lines and 
numbers". The Connecticut 
Yankee, connecting Massa¬ 
chusetts to Washington^ be¬ 
came the Northeast Direct 142. 


Visitor boom in 
confident Canada 


By John Young 


AIR Canada's announcement 
that it is to operate daily 
flights to Calgary and Edmon¬ 
ton this winter, as against five 
a week last year, is evidence of 
the rising popularity of Cana¬ 
da as a winter sports destina¬ 
tion. In three years the 
numbers of British skiers trav¬ 
elling to Banff and Lake 
Louise in Alberta and to 
Whistler in British.Columbia:, 
has leapt from hundreds to 
more than 20,000. 

Return fares from £439 may 
appear steep, but several well- 
known operators, including 
Crystal and Inghams, are 
offering competitive pack¬ 
ages. Thanks to the relative 
weakness of the Canadian 
dollar, prices of hotels, meals, 
lifts and ski hire compare fa¬ 
vourably with Europe. The 
season is generally longer, 
snow conditions more reli¬ 
able; and in a straw poll last 
January British visitors com¬ 
mended the friendliness of the 
locals, the absence of lan¬ 


guage difficulties and not 
being “ripped off”. 'I 

With the summer tonri&Gj 
trade also booming, the num¬ 
ber of UK visitors rose last 
year by nearly 12 per cent 
(compared with a fall of 3 per 
cent to the United States), and 
this year the Canadian Tour¬ 
ism Commission is predicting 
more than 650,000. 

Confidence is evidenced by. 
Canadian Pacific's £650 mil¬ 
lion programme to extend its 
26 hotels, which indude such 
famous landmar ks as the 
Banff Springs and Chateau 
Lake Louise in the Rockies, 
the Empress in Victoria, Brit¬ 
ish Columbia, the Chateau 
Frontenac in Quebec City and 
the Royal York in Toronto. 

“Six or seven years ago our 
landmark hotels were frankly 
tired and living on their past 
reputation,” says John Pye, 
the company's eastern region¬ 
al president “But we are 
determined they should again 
be seen at their very best" 


Risk in the skies 


ALMOST every day an airlin¬ 
er flying over Britain strays 
out of its assigned flight level, 
risking a mid-air collision, 
according to a new report by 
the Civil Aviation Authority. 
Harvey Elliott writes. 

A safety survey of "level 
violations" in UK airspace 
during 1994 revealed that 235 
aircraft strayed from the alti¬ 
tude they were assigned by 
ground controllers. The two 
main causes of the incidents — 
most of which took place when 
the aircraft were climbing 
between 3.000 and 12,000 feet 
— were pilot error or equip¬ 
ment malfunction. 

Nearly 70 per cent of the 
violations involved foreign pi¬ 
lots and the survey calculated 
that II of the 235 reported 
incidents was caused by “pilot 
language difficulties”. Twen¬ 


ty-two were regarded as "prox¬ 
imity hazards" and five were 
assessed as causing a real risk 
of collision. 

Easily the main factor was 
aircrew not complying with 
air traffic control instructions, 
with altimeter setting errors, 
mishandling and call sign 
confusion all high on the list of 
reasons for the height “bust”. 

“The survey has con firm ed 
and reinforced the growing 
concern about these potential¬ 
ly hazardous occurences, espe¬ 
cially as the majority occur in 
congested airspace where 
there is a greater chance of a 
mid-air collision" says the 
report ft urges all airlines to 
introduce “a standard, system¬ 
atic flight-deck altitude aware¬ 
ness safety campaign" be¬ 
cause, it says, procedures are 
not always complied with. 



Travel the world again 
in Weekend 

The Miami experience 
The Baffin's 
experience 
The Disney Institute 
Liz Calder in Brazil 
City Break— 

Stockholm 
Insider's Paris 
Jill Crawshaw*s 
Travel Tips 


A l S l iv \ 1 I \ 


From Opera to 
Outback, we cover 
It ill! 

TRAVEL PORTFOLIO 


Cruisfcbetween Aswan and 

caught up with demand. Having se- 
cured some ertraonlinarily low tariffs 
in recent years.we are pleased to con¬ 
tinue to offer this superior arrange- 
menlatattractiveprk^ This success¬ 
ful and popular journey isbased on the 
first-dass MS Ra NDe cruiser and the 
tour re p re s en ts excellent value far 
money since the tariff includes all 
meals, b^mfo^guidesandexaasions. 

The journey commences with a (Erect 
fli^itfromGatwick to Aswan to join the 
MS Ra. Our week-long cruise win in- 
dudewsjtstotheTejnpleofEtfti,Esna k>ui^bar,sundeckwrtbswzrninjng 
the Tempteofiiamak, the Valley of the pool. Jacuzzi. All cabins are air con- 
Kinfis. the Temple of Queen Hatshep- ditionedandhaveprivatebathrooms. 
sut. Luxor. KornOmfao, and LheA5wan r or a true escape with that magical 
Hi gh Dam. combination of culture and relaxa- 


A Special Announcement 

i the Nile - 7 nights from £395 

Cruise between Aswan and Luxor on board the MS Ra Mar 24X580-Mar 31 



High Dam. 

THE MS RA 

The MS Ra is a large Nile cruiser 
purpose built in Britain accommo¬ 
dating up to 140 passengers. Facili¬ 
ties on board indude a restaurant. 


. T. . wiinncoiw IClUXd- 

bon this ts surely ah opportunity that 
should not be missed. 

DEPARTURES & PRICES 

Mondays - per pmon In twin 

l»fi SepnnberS,23,30X470 


October 7,14X505. 
October 28X565 
NowemberiMlM^.aS'XSTS 
. .December 2.9 £530 
December 16X475 
Dacanbcr23,30£625 
1997 Januwy6,13 £505 
• January20.27£530 
Febroary3,10,17.24 £565 
March 3,20,17X530 


Mar 24X580-Mar 31 £530 
April 7.14,21.28X510 

^fir*20phcoon M ci 10 , [htMlJc ,^ DraJ|It 
-‘XW^reluoniOTiH-JaaSprTPBM, . 
Supplements-per person 

Single cabin £150 
.. tipper decks£95 

Abu Srmbel (by road)£75 

^ of B*eUat, » 

0171-6161000 

?i V S YAGESJUl£s VERNE 









































| It s safer than 1 
l they think [ 


TRAVEL NEWS 21 


Bargains of the week — from 14 nights on a Tuscan wine estate to a trip to Tanzania 


T our operators, we are 

£h*k7-? emlin S Bril ' 
!? h hdidaymakere to 
' hows that are potential death 
trap j:.T hls J i ? apparently “a 
scandal and the question that 
. urgently needs answering ia 
-How many people murt be 
manned or killed before tour 
operatore will take their re¬ 
spond but ties seriously?" 

What a load of boloney. 
(3be Consumers’ Associ- 
a®PW which relies for its very 
existence on its ability to 
frighten nervous people into 
believing that anything they 
do-or buy is dangerous and 
that the world is out to do 
than down, is yet again 
peadimg scare stories. 

In the latest issue of Holi¬ 
day Which?, the association 
daims to have found serious 
safety flaws in swimming 
pools, fire precautions, child¬ 
ren's play areas, lifts and 

I ies in tourist accommo- 
in Turkey and Gran 
ia. M any of the hotels, it 
y states, failed even the 
standards of their own 
y. 

get things into perspec¬ 
tive.? About 13 million people 
fa" v *a package tour holiday 
eve^' year, in 1995.56 of them 
died uvhile abroad. But 34 of 
these \ deaths were in traffic 
accidents and 12 were 
drowniVigs in the sea. None of 
these cnuild. therefore; reason¬ 
ably be put down to a lack of 
concern Vbeing shown for safe¬ 
ty by th^ tour operator. For 
the third y 'ear in succession no 
one died \in a fire, and there 
was only urp.e swimming-pool 
fatality. 

There is cause' for concern, 
however, over die six deaths 
caused by falls .from balco¬ 
nies. And tour operators — 
whether the Consumers’ Asso¬ 
ciation accepts it or not — are 
worried and are now trying to 
establish whether there is 
some kind of pattern to the 
falls so that the most appropri¬ 
ate form of pressure can be 
put on hotel owners. 

If, for example; the acd- 
deir'ft were happening to 
yougg children, a different 
approach would be needed 
than if the deaths were mainly 
among young men. perhaps 
acting out a Romeo role. 

Tour operators are so con¬ 
cerned about safety that they 



HOIELS 


The 
Travel 
Business 
-- 

Harvey 

eluott 


employ dozens of inspectors 
to check hotels. Last year the 
leadingiour operators spent 
tumillton on safety checks. 
^ nd -i hat 31 a Iin,e when the 
losin 8 a tola l of 

£9.9 million. 

I am not simply defending 
i 0 wTi° peraIOrs ’ some of which 
I believe are irresponsible in 
using airlines that have too 

r P 1 ??** to be able to ensure 
reliability, and which are cut¬ 
ting margins - and therefore 
standards - to the bone to 
achieve faster growth. 

Holidays are supposed to 
be about fun and enjoyment. 
And when people are'enjoy¬ 
ing themselves, you cannot 
always legislate for their be¬ 
haviour. When on holiday we | 
tend to take risks we would 
never take at home. Even so. 
the 13 deaths by drowning 
while on package holidays 
last year compare with 473 
deaths by drowning in Britain 
in the same period. 

Is Britain really the para¬ 
gon of safety the Consumers' 
Association would have us 
believe? 

Young people are now de¬ 
manding ever more exalting, 
adventurous travel often in 
wild and untamed parts of the 
world where concern over 
piles and regulations is slim 
indeed. And even the more 
conservative holidaymaker is 
heading further afield, away 
from the standardised Euro¬ 
pean package. 

I n the Caribbean, India, 
the Far East South Amer¬ 
ica and all the other 
exciting regions of the world 
which are now opening up, 
the holidaymaker is unlikely 
to find absolute conformity to 
some bureaucratic safety 
standard. 

But the fun and the excite¬ 
ment will be there — without 
I hope, some whey-faced wor¬ 
rier from Holiday Which? 
wailing that unless everyone 
complies with regulation X, Y 
and 4 we are all doomed. 


GUESTS staying Friday and Saturday nights 
at the newly refurbished Glasgow Thistle hotel 
inOctober and November gel the Sunday night 
free. Rooms cost £75 a night for an executive 
room and £90 for an executive studio for up to 
four people. Details: 0141-332 3311. 

■ DUKES Hotel in St James’s, central London, 
has a late summer offer until the end of the 
month of double rooms for £160 a night 
including VAT and breakfast, instead of the 
normal rate of E20O. Details: 0171-491 4840. 

■ HIGHLIFE Breaks has August bank holi¬ 
day hotel bargains at up to 10 per cent off its 
normal brochure prices. Details: 0800 70 0 400. 

■ PLUMBER Manor in Dorset is banking on 

Thomas Hardy being the next “rediscovered” 
English author. It is offering a “Hardy 
Heritage- weekend break on October 25-27 for 
£255 per person based on double occupancy. 
Details from Pride of Britain: 01264 736604. 

■ ETTtNGTON Park, voted the most haunted 
hotel in Britain by the AA, is hosting a ghost 
weekend on November 8 with guest speakers 
and a tour of its ghostly attractions. Casts for 
two nights in a double/rwin room with dinner 
and admission to nearby Warwick Castle is 
£225 per person. Details: 01789 450123. 

■ LADIES who lunch at the Four Seasons 
Hotel restaurant on Park Lane from September , 
until the end of the year will be entitled to 
special services, including an initial 10 per cent 
discount from Selfridges" Personal Shopping 
department. Details: 0171-499 C188S. 

■ SPECIAL rates at the Conrad International 
Hurghada on the shores of the Red Sea are £32 
per person for double rooms pier night and £55 
single until the end of September. The rate at 
the Conrad Barcelona mentioned in Iasi week’s 
column should have been £72 per person per 
night plus VAT. basal on a three-night stay. 
Details: 0990 445866. 

■ TICKETS to the new £12 million Earth 
Galleries exhibit at the Natural History 
Museum are included in a special package at 
the four-star Chelsea Hotel in London’s 
Krughtsbridge from August 26 to 28 inclusive. 
The price of £99 per room per night includes 
accommodation for up to two adults and one 
child, foil English breakfast and tickets. 
Details: 0171-838 9650. 

■ THE Arkona Hotel Voltaire in Potsdam, has 
a special rate until the end of theyear of DMI98 
(about £84) per room, per night, double 
occupancy and DM169 (E72) for single. Rates 
include buffet breakfast and service charge. 
Details through Prima Hotels: 0800 181535. 

■ THE Movenpick Jolie Ville Hotel in the Red 
Sea resort of Sharm Ell Sheikh is offering 
guests with Kuoni Travel a $20 refund if it rains 
for more than five consecutive minutes in 24 
hours during their holiday (until the end of 
October). A seven-night stay, including flights, 
from £499 per person. Details: 01306 743000. 



Enjoy die fruits of a twoweek. self-catering stay in a vineyard in Chianti (see Holidays) 


CROSS CHANNEL 

SALLY Ferries has introduced a flat rate re rum 
fare of £89 on its two routes from Ramsgate to 
Ostend or Dunkirk. The price covers a car. two 
adults and up to three children on selected 
sailings daily. Details: 0345 160000. 

■ STENA Line has introduced daytrips to 
Dublin for foot passengers on its HSS fast ferry 
from Holyhead. Fares start at £19 per adult and 
from E48 for a family ticket — two adults and 
two children — to include train transfer to 
Dublin city centre. Details: 0990 707070. 

■ SCANDINAVIAN Seaways has a special 
three-night break leaving Harwich next Tues¬ 
day for Gothenburg in Sweden. Prices start at 
£89 to include one night aboard while in port a 
sightseeing tour of the city and breakfasts. 
Details: 0990 333222. 

■ UNTIL September 30 P&O has excursion 
fares of £10 a car. £9 an adult and £6 a child 
from Portsmouth to Le Havre or Cherbourg 
with 36 hours ashore. Details: 0990 980980. 

■ SEACAT Scotland expects its two millionth 
passenger on the Stranraer-Belfast route soon 
and is offering a reward of two flights to Venice 
and a return to London on the Orient Express. 
Details: 0345 523523. 

■ STENA line has discounts for camping and 
mobile homes in Brittany and on the Atlantic 
coast of France as well as the Riviera. Deals on 
hotels and apartments are also in its Outstand¬ 
ing Offers brochure. Details: 0990 747474. 


/: FLIGHTS 

BAA. the airport operator, has launched its 
Bonus Points loyalty scheme at Heathrow. 
Membership is free, with card-holders earning 
points when they use one of Heathrow’s 
commercial outlets. Details: 0800 844844. 

■ THE Executive Club International (annual 
fee £55) is granting a 10 per cent discount on all 
published air fares booked and ticketed before 
August 31. Free membership for the first 20 
callers from The Times. Details: 0181-686 0486. 

■ BRYMON Airways has a £99 fare from 
Plymouth to Paris. Details: 0345 2221H. 

■ BRITISH Airways Express has £69 summer 
excursions between Gatwick and Antwerp. 
Amsterdam, Cologne, Dusseldorf and Rotter¬ 
dam. Details: 0345 222111. 

■ DEBONAIR is charging £59 one way for 
bookings made on its new Luton to Copenha¬ 
gen service before August 22 for travel during 
October. Details: 0500146200. 

■ GB Airways has a £229 return fare to three 
destinations in Morocco: Agadir. Marrakesh 
and Tangier. Details: 0345 222111. 

■ TRAVELMOOD has a cut-price £335 fare to 
Dubai Dying with Alitalia. Book before August 
31. Details: 0171-258 0280. 

■ TRAVEL Warehouse has Malaysia Airlines 
flights of £540 to Kuala Lumpur and Penang 
until December 9. Details: 0171-414 8808. 


TONY Blair's favourite holiday spot — Tuscany 
— still has room for visitors in September. Two 
weeks staying in a medieval wine estate in 
Chianti costs £1.139 for self-catering accommo¬ 
dation. flights, transfers, insurance and car 
hire. Details Cricketer Holidays: 01892 b6424 2. 

■ THERE are plenty of vacancies in France 
this autumn, too. A shared villa with pool in the 
Vendee for six people for one week will cost 
£639 through Connect France: 0181-715 1122. 

■ THE Marquess of Northampton is offering 
a house party weekend at his home, Castle 
Ashby, from September 20-22. The weekend 
includes dinner hosted by the marquess and 
marchioness, clay pigeon shooting and car¬ 
riage driving. Cost £350. Details: 01604696696. 

■ A TAILOR-MADE combination of the 
Greek islands of Santorini, Folegandros and 
Ids is available through Argo Holidays for £66S 
per person including flights, transfers and half 
board accommodation. Derails: 0171-331 7070. 

■ WALKERS of only moderate fitness could 
spend 14 days walking from Funchal to Ribeira 
Brava and Porto Moniz in Madeira with half¬ 
board accommodation from September 8 with 
Waymark Holidays. Details: 01753 516477. 

■ MEDITERRANEAN Shipping Cruises is 
offering an Il-night “Highlights of Spain and 
North Africa "cruise on the Monterey departing 
from Genoa on September 21, October 2 and 13. 
The price of £864 per person includes flights 
from Heathrow, full board, transfers and 
entertainment. Details: 0171-637 2525. 

■ FIRST World War tours to Ypres and 
Passendale. the Somme. Vimy Ridge and Arras 
in September and October are available 
through Galina Battlefield Tours from £99 for 
three days. Details: 01482 806020. 

■ THROUGHOUT November, Worldwide 
Journeys & Expeditions is offering a Classic 
Tanzania safari for El ,985 per person inclusive 
of all meals, accommodation, transport, fees 
and flights. Staying in lodges and luxury tented 
accommodation, the L2-day trip takes in 
Arusha, Lake Manyara. the Serengeri. the 
Ngorongoro Crater and Tarangire national 
park. Details: 0171-381 8638. 

■ SPEND the bank holiday in Peregine 
Cottage, Ross-on-Wye which featured in the 
film Shadowlands. It is ideal for fishing and 
bird-watching. Cost through Btakes Country 
Cottages is £393 a week. Details: 01282 445 097. 

■ THERE are a few spaces left on the August 
24 adventure holidays to Austria, including 
white water rafting, paragliding, trekking, 
skiing and mountain biking. Three sports will 
cost E415 and ail five £465 with Tall Stories. 
Details: 01932 252002. 

■ AIR Liberty’s fare from Gatwick to Bordeaux 
and Toulouse is now £140 return and no longer 
£99. In September and October it drops to a 
minimum of £129 return. Details: 0345 22S899. 


TO ADVERTISE CALL 
0171 481 1989 (TRADE) 


CHECK-IN 







tel:0171 434 3000 


0P£H:Han-S;t 


MERICA 


, ■ilrtB TTf (Met af escorted coach and seff-drfav 
too* motorhomes. Florida. Bahama* and Canadian 
Hobdays call Just America. 

quality holidays to North America. 

j._i c-a iws Wp have a limited number 

of coach and se*f-drive holidays 
remaining for the popular Autumn 
season in beautiful New England. 



lit K ’I 

ease 




0171402 4044 


SYDNEY .... E27Q £475 

■ AUCKLAND £J 13 £599 1 

1-UE.VV YDJU4-£_!lfl_£.V/3 | 

MIAMI_£tt\U_i.27S f 

L. A"-' £159 £230 1 

8 AMOK OK_CT95 £ 113 . ■ 

1 SINGAPORE _£22b £janl 

■ JHQNp KI1NC £754 C4 TO P 

j JO "DUHG E£?0 £433.1 

I INDIA. .. £.1U5 I : "ia I 

"CANADA_1.1 15..El 99 . 

ipAB'lti -- E--49.X fiij 

■ AC.-LS.T-_D AM_£.5 9 L /S. 

| ROME. ... _E 73 SXiO | 




TRAVB. UX LTD 


BANGKOK 6. £345 NEW YORK fr.£207 

COPENHAGEN £160 PARIS £80 

DUBAI £225 RIO £480 

£444 SINGAPORE £445 

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£685 TOKYO £608 


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LONDON 0171 244 8844 GLASGOW 0141 221 2604 
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0171 481 4000 (PRIVATE): 
FAX: 0171 481 9313 


o7 


★ STA TRAVEL * 

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22 


THE TIMES TODAY 


THURSDAY AUGUST 15 1996 




Scramble for university places 


■ Record A-level pass rates to be announced today will trigger 
an unprecedmted scramble for places at leading universities 
and increase pressure on the Government to reform the 
examinations system. 

More than half of this autumn’s 290.000 higher education 
places had been filled as admissions tutors coped with the 15th 
successive rise in A-level grades......Pages 18,9 

British soldiers wounded in Cyprus 

B Two British soldiers serving with the United Nations force 
in Cyprus were wounded during renewed dashes between 
troops from the Turkish-occupied north of the island and 
Grade Cypriot demonstrators. The two soldiers from 39 
Regiment Royal Artillery suffered gunshot wounds while 
frying to hold baric protesters at Dherinia.-....Page I 


Mall order murder 

Pressure far a ban on the private 
ownership of handguns intens¬ 
ified alter a man who bought a 
semi-automatic pistol through 
mail order was jailed for 
murder-Pages 1.3 


Portillo problem 

Michael PortiUo’s difficulties over 
the proposed sale of his local Tory 
headquarters to McDonald’s 
deepened when it was disclosed 
that Central Office will benefit by 
up to EI00.000 —-Pages 1, 2 

Consultants resign 

The chairman of a hospital trust 
was forced out of his job after a 
mass resignation by 16 of his 
leading consultants page 2 

Guarding the guards 

Thousands of private guards face 
vetting by a special agency under 
Home Office proposals to dean 
up the security industry —Page 2 

Rottweiler attack 

Two boys told an inquest jury 
how they watched Rottweiler 
dogs savage an Il-year-old friend 
to death. Anthony Pickup, 13. and 
Marie Farran, 10, said “three big 
black dogs” tore David Kearney 
apart--Page 3 


Water in space 

New pictures of one of Jupiters 
moons. Europa. have provided 
tantalising hints that icy floes on 
its surface may be floating on 
slush or even water_Page 5 

Wind farm fears 

A plan to build the world's largest 
offshore wind farm two miles 
from the Norfolk coast provoked 
serious concern among natural¬ 
ists about the effect rat seals and 
birds — _Page 6 


Parents mourn vicar 


The parents of die Rev Christo¬ 
pher Gray, the vicar who was 
stabbed to death outside his vicar¬ 
age in Liverpool, spoke movingly 
of how he had given himself to the 
Church.-.Pages 


Palatial home 

For King Cogidubnus. chief of a 
British tribe, it was home. For 
anyone else, the palace at Fish- 
bo lime was a feat of engineering 
and craftsmanship: Roman 
Britain-.. Page 10 

Grozny attack 

A Russian strike by Sukhoi 25 
ground attack jets on a district of 
Grozny occurred exactly five min¬ 
utes after hostilities were sup¬ 
posed to have ended after more 
than a week of clashes .. .Page 11 

Powell boost 

As the Republican Party conven¬ 
tion prepared to annoint Bob 
Dole his aides were plotting ways 
to boost his electoral appeal by 
exploiting Colin Powell.. Page 12 

Elephant crisis 

Conservationists reacted with 
outrage to an upsurge in illegal 
professional hunting of semi- 
tame elephants from Kenya's 
Amboseli Park.- Page 13 


Prize dog drugged by rival owner 


■ A woman who gave a prize chihuahua a valium tablet 
shortly before it was due to compete in a top dog show was 
banned from the Kennel Club for five years. The pill, 
administered by Carol Brampton, a dog owner from 
Faversham, Kent, left Chizzy incapable of standing or wagging 
her tail, the disciplinary committee was told.Page 1 



The Prince of Wales toasts the Croatian Prime Minister Zlatko Matesa on (he island of St Marie during his cruise of the Adriatic 

ES 


Jobs: Unemployment fell to its 
lowest for five years with the under¬ 
lying trend continuing downwards, 
according to the Office for National 
Statistics.Page 23 

Uoytfs: The £3.2 billion rescue 
plan is an unlawful scheme which 
"infringes fundamental principles" 
governing the insurance market, 
die High Court heard Pkge 23 

In toe red: A poor performance by 
the Balfour Beatty contracting 
business plunged B1CC, the con¬ 
struction and cables group, into the 
red..-.Page 23 

Markets: The FT-SE 100 Index 6.9 
to 38303. Sterling's trade-weighted 
index rose from 84.6 to S4J8 after 
falling from $13508 to $13506 
but rising from DM23898 to 
DM23005__Page 26 


spa ftr 


Football: Arsenal bought two 
French players despite the fact that 
they have no manager. Aston Villa 
signed the Yugoslav midfield play¬ 
er. Sasa Currie, for £4million from 
Bolton Wanderers_Pages 41.44 

Cricket: Pakistan, fresh from 
their draw with England in the 
second Test match at Headingley, 
struggled an an unhelpful pitch 
to only 221 all out against 
Leicestershire—.—- Page 42 


Equestrianism: Geoff Billington, of 
Britain, will lead the line-up of 
Olympic riders who will compete 
in the Silk Cut Derby meeting start¬ 
ing at Hickstead today..... Page 38 
Racing: Dermot Weld, the Irish 
trainer, is geared to extending his 
success on international race- 
-Page 39 


courses. 


ARTS 


Jack’s out New films include: The 
Crossing Guard with Jack Nichol¬ 
son; Sharon Slone as a murderer in 
Last Dance: Hunger Artist, a short 
but invigorating British work by 

Bernard Rudden.. Page 31 

Releases: A little Princess, Smith¬ 
ereens and When Saturday Comes 
on video; songs by Clara and Rob¬ 
ert Schumann on CD.Page 32 

Edinburgh nights: Robert Wilson's 
staging of Virginia Woolfs Orlan¬ 
do proves monotonous; but the 
Marie Morris Dance Group's fifth 
consecutive visit to the festival pro¬ 
vides a stimulating evening of mod¬ 
em dance.-.Page 33 

Last blast Thirty-five years after 
his Proms debut, Barry Tuckwell 
played his swansong in Mozart's 
Third Horn Concerto.Page 33 



^ZXMamQVt 


IN THE TIMES 


■ POP 

Soul meets R&B on 
the new single from 
Aaliyah (left). If Your 
Girt Only Knew 


■ INTERVIEW 
Valerie Grove meets 
David Blunkett, 
Labour’s education 
spokesman 


FEATURES 


Heady mixture: Nicholas Soames 
declares he has taken nun-like 
vows of poverty, chastity and obedi¬ 
ence — but loves foie gras, cham¬ 
pagne. venison, music, parties and 

girls. Page 15 

Dr Thomas Stuttaford writes on 
improving the safety of babies and 
the health of mothers during and 
after childbirth; the danger signs of 
violence; asthma's link to snails; 
and measles. Page 14 


BOOKS 


Spoilt for choice: Jonathan Mirsky 
on handing over Hong Kong; Glyn 
Maxwell on William Morris in Ice¬ 
land; fiery physics: a fine first 
novel.-.Pages 34.35 


TV LISTINGS 


Preview: In 1974, the Prime Minis¬ 
ter was convinced that renegade 
MIS officers were trying to under¬ 
mine his Government. Harold 
Wilson — the Final Days (Channel 
4, 9.00pm) Review: Ffcier Barnard 
is inspired by a Russian strong¬ 
man's determination.Page 43 




Dole’s dream team 

The issue is not whether Mr Dole 


can give his blessing jo Genera] 
Powell but whether it is in f f 


COLUMNS 


1 


WILLIAM REES-MOGG * 

The trouble with Europe is ihair^j? 
people do not trust the bureaucr/aii, 
and the bureaucrats certainty do 
not trust the people._.P*7ge 16 


MAGNUS UNKLATER 


TRAVEL 


Clean air campaign; The Scottish 
Tourist Board is starting a poster 
campaign promoting the freshness 

of the Highlands.- Page 20 

Bargains: From rwo weeks on a 
wine estate in Tuscany to a 12-day 
safari in Tanzania..-Page 21 


THERAPER& 


Turkey is trying to act as a bridge 
between the Balkans, the Middle 
East, the Gulf, the Caucasus and 
Central Asia. Turkey’s war against 
the Kurds could easily degenerate 
into an Algerian-type conflict, 
which in turn would de-stabilise 
the region, which would involve us 
all —II Messaggero, Rome 


The Stone of Destiny des&rves a 
hallowed place in Scotland, put one 
that is independent of religious fac¬ 
tions. It should go to tfre great 
National War Memorial ^ Edin¬ 
burgh castle, a building dedicated 
to Scotland’s people. —Page 16 
ROBERT RUNCIE 
The urban vicarage continues to be 
a sanavai^ in what for many has 
become a hostile'world. If there is 
no one to fall back on. there is 

always the vicar .Page 16 

JOHN BRYANT 
There are. apparently, plans afool 
to give Redgrave a civic reception 
when he goes back to Marlow, 
where they know a thing or two 
about rowing. Let’s hope they^ it 
in style-Pagi 42 


OBITUARIES 


Captain Bobby Petre. jockey; John 
Lamgan. operatic tenor. Richard 
Goodwin, economist.Page 19 


LETTERS 


Modem medicine; Sir Frank Whit¬ 
tle: new telephone boxes; duty free: 
postal dispute; Robert the Bruce; 
Britten statue__Page 17 


THE TIMES CROSSWORD NO 20,247 



ACROSS 
1 Meet in a bar (7). 

5 Weapon replacing the mace (7). 

9 State opening mostly generating 

heat (9). 

10 Give more drink to young boxer, 
say f3 2). 

11 ftwtrayed doctor with beard (5). 

12 Perhaps Arab people developed 
shore? (9). 

14 Disorder creating pain so! (6,8)- 
17 Cabinet-makers one's employed 
a in the best church buildings (5.9). 
21 Fashionable passage ro New Zea¬ 
land attracts a complaint (9). 

23 Derisive defence one needed after 
jumping bail (5). 

24 Useless record held by silly rut (5). 
3 25 Very valuable diamonds left in 

cupboard (9)._ 


26 Compound charge in hours of 
darkness, we hear (7). 

27 Conductor needs a little time to 
take a rest when agitated (7). 


Solution to Puzzle No 20246 


HIHEHSnBSSGi afflisa 
moans m a 
wussaKUinraH annn 
00011113300 
HEH0 Einaanasns 
□ Hrannana 
oGsesnnaian sanmasa 
ee gj s ra a H 
EHBnacn saESEOSEra 
anmasoBa 
HnEoiiHHsa ranga 

onaaniana 

sbiib raoasQnsHaa 
ra ci Horans 
Bass cinnHaBBBBB 


DOWN 

1 Rotter in US intelligence is a 
chirpy type (6). 

2 Forger a French king's name (7). 

3 Norse god is held by woman to 
rule with an iron hand J9). 

4 Religious revolution helping to 
usher in English ceremony (11). 

5 This could keep you dry as river's 
rising (3). 

6 Get hold of spiteful woman before 
church (5). 

7 Outside theatre, capital raised for 
socalled musical work (7). 

8 Drink served in Conservatives’ 
Press Office (S). 

13 Result of overrewing? (It). 

15 Four identical notes about a 
confidential meeting (4-1-4). 

16 Work painter said he could help 
one see better (8). 

18 Spread complaint about Liberal 
decline? (7). 

19 Intend to split regular payments 
for dress (7). 

2D Raise provided as business calam¬ 
ity ensues (6). 

22 Extremist last month given right 
ro have article (5). 

25 Parking? That’s an easy thing (3). 




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Gnrnpesi & E Hrtvmcs 
NWSoqiU.-*: 

Caffmess Crvw< & ShtSaoa 
Nbfiteno _ 

Weathercalicharged a! per minute (cheep 
rate) and 4-topermrurc ati'ct*r>rlanes 


708 

.... 709 

. .710 

_711 

m 

713 

.714 

.. „ . 715 

. 716 
„ . 717 
7TB 
- 719 
. . 720 

721 

. .. 722 

723 

724 

. . . 725 

726 
.. 777 


51 


AA ROADWATCH 


Trio Base W Baroicacssrs. S55SS35S. 24 


ham a tfaf Oat G356 40; ‘'oSsMO by ssttaphcio 
coda 

London 6 SCteaOb iMdMoria 


731 

Esj'siWeiwBee.'Sub'i 

732 

Km.'Sin*) 

rn 

M25 Uncon Wx's 

NdMdMIeioilRiKbnrti 

’aft 

rixnnal rrttcr*-i>-. 


UtesfCourirv 

na 

W«ea . 

. . T3? 

r.telar-Ii 

'<;• 

Eari Anr>j 

741 

Harfh-w« 

742 

Narttwoc; 

743 


Nonhem irttrw 745 

AA R-aancEch .1 cf^nr.-c vZszstr :c.W<? 
rate) ara «8p per trnnjc -Y. T -jmer - yjy. 


HOURS OF DARKNESS 


Sun uses; Sunsets: 

5 4c an c?3pm 


Moon sets 
8-32 Em 

Firct quarter August 2? 

London 8 23 pm "z 5 4£ *-> 
Brtstat a32 cm ta 5 S3 5 T 
E&ntourohB 49 am 13 E 46 
Manchester 8 77 pro ro ES0 are 
R 9 ra*ncaS«Qpm «6 i3ar 


Moon rises 
7 07 am 




□ General: England and Wales will 
be dry with sunny spells alter mist 
dears; patchy drizzle In the east, but 
there should be some afternoon sun 
over East Anglia. It will be fahty warm. 

Scotland arid Northern Ireland win 
have some sunny spells. But thicken¬ 
ing cloud will bring rain and drizzle to 
pats of western Scotland later. 

□ London, E & W Midlands, Cent 
N England: patchy drizzle, then dry 
with sunny spells. Wind light and 
variable. Max 23C (73F). 

□ S E England, E Anglia, E 
England, lowdoud and drizzle slowly 
clearing, sunny spells developing. 
Wind mainly northeast, light. Max 22C 
(72F), but cooler near coasts 

□ Cent S.SW.NW.NE England, 


Channel Isles, S & N Wales, Lake 
District, Borders, Edinburgh & 
Dundee: early mist, then sunny 
periods. Wind light and variable, but 
coastal breezes. Max 22C (72F). 

□ Isle of Man, Aberdeen, SW.NE 
Scotland, Glasgow, Cent High¬ 
lands, Moray Ffrto, N Ireland: 
sunny spells but clouds increasing. 
Wind south Jo southwest, light or 
moderate. Max 22C (72F). 

□ Argyll, N W Scotland: clouds 
thickening, rain later. Wind southerly 
moderate or fresh. Max 18C (64F). 

□ Orkney, Shetland: mainly dry. but 
clouds increasing Wind southerly 
moderate or fresh. Max 16C (6IF). 

□ Outlook: patchy rain In northwest 
at first, otherwise ary and sunny. 


AROUND BRFTAIK YESTERDAY 


2 -hrstoSpm b- 


Abonfeon 
Anglesey 
Aspatra 
Aufonoro 
Belfast 
Bwiringfum 
Bogncf P 
Bowwn’f! 
BnsasJ 
Buflcr 
Carom 
Qaean 
CoterynBay 
Cromer 
DirfcEo 
Eastbourne 
EsSrtauigh 
Gunouffl 
FakrouSi 
Rshguarfl 
RAastnoe 
Gtasgo* 
GuBriBoy 
Hating* 


How 
late 0t Man 
Jmey 
Kmk»5» 


bnght C’doixtd 

=rti^o:ds-dull stem. du^du*;i*>ldrfg=fOQ; g-’odo. h> 

hfflfc 

c= 

rdn. sh 

=stsmr, a-atoot on-snew, s^SUK 

«thuriS3r 




Sun 

Hsu 


U-J* 



Sun Ran 


Urn 


m 

tn 

C 

F 



hrs to 

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16 

64 

5 

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75 

23 

73 


100 


21 

70 

■i 

UHtoftmptn 

79 

24 

75 


13 0 


22 

rj 

0 

London 

0? 

19 

ft, 

c 

25 

001 

16 

64 

c 

LtswsWl 

62 

23 

73 

& 

ee 

. 

20 

69 


Manchaslor 

103 

n 

73 

% 

Jt T 


19 

66 

c 

Mtnohnad 

110 001 

£ 

72 


e* 


73 

rj 

r . 

Marocaratjo 

l)n 

71 

70 

r. 

T i ? 


24 

77 

T. 

NrMCriSe 

1(16 

18bJ 



3 2 



?£. 


Nanvich 

1 4 001 

19 

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i 3 


13 


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9 ■ 

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73 

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21 

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Ponzjnco 

X 




7 J 


21 

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136 

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17 3 


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B0S9-O-wyc> 

99 

23 

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30 1 

16 

61 

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Rydo 

X 

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75 

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75 


lb 



Sateurnbo 

136 

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u- 

72 

r. 

34 

aoi 

17 

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c 

SondoNn 

122 

23 

73 

•i 

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Saurttn Sod 

110 

20 

ffl 


727 


20 

6d 

f 

Scartwro’ 

4 1 

17 

63 

*•7 

135 


22 

• ► 


Shrewrihuty 

75 

22 

73 

b 

e * 


16 

01 

c 

SMpm 


17 

63 

c 

26 



7* 

» 

Satnipon 

115 

21 

70 

\ 

45 


^1 

70 

c 

SUreovKay 

02 am 

10 

61 

r 



21 

70 


Swanage 

128 

24 

75 

T 

3 i 


22 

72 

b 

T«qrei*bu1h 

IJP 

21 

70 

j 

96 


23 

73 


Taobr 

98 


72 


03 


20 

ua 

c 

free 

80 

17 

63 

b 

B2 


24 

7S 

b 

Torquay 

IP 6 

-,*, 


• e 

73 5 


21 

70 


VorHnor 

123 

23 

73 


127 


24 

75 

z 

WaM-a-maro 

93 

K! 

72 

» 

33 


19 

66 


Woyimxdh 

120 

21 

70 

Z 




ABROAD 


■Junes Two Crossword, page 44 


otimes MEWSnmns LIMITED, im publbhcd and printed uvi SgflfflSii? 


ohn. telephone 
ofTh*. 


lASODO.Thunday, mirusi 13.1WS. 


FLIGHT SAVERS * 


LONDON TO 

BRUSSELS 

from £89 return 


LONDON TO * 
PARIS 


return. 


LONDON TO 

ZURICH 

from £79 return. 


Phona teUtOD 0349 8*6777or sa i a s 
yoar me a**#, n maw o*Sl 
Konad Sut*d to antaC*?_vrcr t* 

art afletw S**l Pfwes. Re»as« «s^{ 
Bo* t* 22*1 
SaaJttteri Q.3S* fri 


Atacctt 

Akratfri 

AJn'dru 

A &en 

Afflstritn 

Athens 

B Area 

Bahrain 

Bangko* 

Btebadoa 

B aro ta a 

Band 

□ulyiada 

Bartn 

O wm m te 

Biame 

Bprda-x 

Bnriaab 

Budapat 

Cwra 

CapsTn 

Ch'chutch 

Chicago 

Cdogm 

Corfu 


27 ai -. 

CTphsgn 

73 73 1 

Matoga 

27 at r. 

31 88 s 

Dudm 

17 cJ c 

MnBn 

31 tn s 

as- 84( 

DuOrtwrdi 

25 71 i 

Motomn 

14 57 s 

r to • 

Faro 

25 77 s 

Mexico C 

22 7?a 

;fl ea i 

Florence 

2C 79c 

Morel 

32 90 s 

r w ^ 

FnnMWt 

10 W s 

MHon 

IB WC 

2T- f» * 

Funcriri 

24 75c 

Montrool 

2« 15 5 

391C2 s 

GaiM 

ro 631 

Moscow 

21 70 c 

32 9C? 

Gandar 

24 75 -s 

Munich 

tU 66 1 

3D SB 1 

HMKM 

?« 75 s 

NDean 

31 ESI 

24 75 L 

Hang K 

31 88 s 

NYort 

IB 64 1 

30 B6r 

Haatarii 

15 Wi 

Haubt 

IB 64 1 

3 64 s 

Istanbul 

27 81 f 

Naptaa 

Z3 82 1 

:: 63 ( 

Jeddah 

3b 97 t 

Mob 

26 79 c 

.’3 82 s 
21 731 

sss 

23 73 « 

X 

Onto 

Parts 

25 77 1 
17 63 i 

25 771 

17 63 i 

tssi 

24 75 0 

26 79 a 

PaWng 

Parti 

27 81 c 
12 54 c 

20 68 : 

LaTquat 

17 63 1 

Prague 

20 60 » 

32 to i 
13 55 t 

tribe" 

Locarno 

25 77 5 

71 73 s 

SET* 

11 52 . 
23 04 i 

10 50 - 

Uaxambg 

la 67 r 

Mode J 

25 77 i 

27 B1 

Usssr 

38 IK 

Ftyrih 

43109 i 

59 66 C 

Maddd 

3D BE f 

Homo 

27 81 1 

2? 81 1 

Majorca 

3U 85 r 

SFr'rico 

25 77 s 


SpUms 

Santiago 

Soou) 

Suibpc* 

SlUiolm 

Stroob'rg 

TtmgJor 
Td Awtw 


Td t 
toneflte 
Tokyo 
Toronto 
Tunte 
Vdanda 
Vanc'vor 
Vonica 
Vienna 
Warrant 
Washlon 
Worngl 
ZuK3> 



72 1 

IS 

PD 1 

26 

rot 

30 

8 b < 

26 

79 s 

10 

64 r 

in 

66 5 

25 

7? 

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88 r 

27 

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30 

«■ 1 

27 

81 l 

33 

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re 

02 1 

23 

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24 

75 a 

21 

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64 • 

21 

10 c 

11 

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17 

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Tnmporahodi at "WSds/ brat t*no on Tumriiv * - noi aviiJaUn 


.» - — - 


X 


± * ♦ 

® ^ •/ z 

■ fcb MODERATE 


20 



^ Sunny 

L^v.-Sunm'' 1 

C^3 Cloudy 

Drizzle 

a* 

Overcast 


?!? Rain -- I 




Sunny 


i showers , 
Sleet and • 

(^* s H nn y 


showers 


^Lightning 


Hail 


‘Snow 


J0 MhA ! — Sea 

W. MODERATE' CA ~ U com 


13 Temperature 1 
73 (Celsius) ! 


_m Wind speed . 

® m- 


irection 

i 

conditions 


Chang.*3 In chart bolovi' from no.-n luah C U>> 1 '.*rfdr. No wwth litf'o .arjno ;<»r\irai 

lew D oipoi NE iwfh link- ch.jngo in formal crcc-.iir-.-. is* = :rad-7i N£ ar-i Ceopsns 



m 





interests to do so..Page i7 

Priests in the city 

It would be easy to despair but 
Father Gray's own example en¬ 
courages a hope that the best an¬ 
swer to human misery is not retrea t 
but positive engagement... Page 17 

Far-flung Phoenicians 

To a still greater extent than the 
Vikings. Dutch or Portuguese after 
them, the Phoenicians left little < 
mark on land. Their claim is on the / 
imagination.-...Page l£ 



.-1-: -S'*’ 



■a’ 

21 


pz 

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sar.-;. 


r-r 
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Bo\v t- s o. 

uU\f : 


Via>m Ironl 
Cold from 

i'-r'u -- 1 •-**• Ocdudud rioref i 




r,-, 

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HIGH TIDES 


3 


TOCAY 
London Biid)}" 
Abcidrm 
Awniwui 

BaSast 

CwUrtt 

Dawnport 

Dovoi 

DuMi (N Wad] 
Fdnnulh 
Greenock 
Harwich 
Holyhead 
HdfiAttmr 


jjl 

147 
7 4G 
1IM 
734 
6 13 
1145 


HT 

67 

4 P 
126 
3 .' 

116 

5 1 
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PM 

233 
2 10 


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6 7 
4 1 
12 7 


iMbrnDl 
Uiaaxnttt 
hinge Ivnn 


536 

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1052 

6.41 

637 

647 

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48 

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7-05 


119 

53 
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capyr«jjrJ ri: -rrvcrf A( 


TODAY 

Lrf'th 

Un*pOo4 

Law-Jal; 

M.nt>aie 

!A3Fo*d H ^vn 

N'Sikvm, 

Otun 

PCfWjnor 

Ponjr.n 

Porfsre-irch 

Shorori»n 

5oulri^irrscon 

Tooi 

WKwwi-tk,; 
i-jv-. c*.iT He-cnr- 


AM 

-’02 
11 35 
95? 

on 

645 

5 33 

6 23 
5 :3 


HT 
5 4 

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26 

ii 

6.5 
65 
38 
5 7 


PM 


HT 

53 


24 

4 6 


<> ■ 




5 2-v 


■5 5.9 
t: 55 


45 

60 


£ l 
i I 


SMV 

y 


6 5: 
4« 


90 
S • 
SO 


i: as 

11 r-1 
'r-4 


%:• 


HIGHEST & LOWEST 




I rotnU. HoftsDarh, Uncntn-^hirc. OCftr hignast oumhtno of Rtorr U 





Total number of lives saved so far this year: 

Total number of lifeboat launches so far this year: 
Cose to RNLI per day: 

Cost to taxpayer. 

To make a donation, telephone: 


331 

1,952 

£173,000 

£0 

0800 S43210 



lifeboats 


iuimw ulsxa- irs.r 
fet Chmn SV 




:ii 


Ai: